Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

Views: 57043

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Maybe we are just getting old and crotchety - I too no longer get much enjoyment out of the movie theater experience. My pet peeve is the commercials and previews that run for 20 minutes or more prior to the start of the film. And the ever increasing ticket and concession prices make it even more upsetting that I have to sit through paid advertisements.

The one exception to this is an old theater on the edge of Detroit, built in 1928, that offers film classics on Fridays and Saturdays only. The theater staff is entirely volunteer and all profits from concessions and tickets go toward upkeep and refurbishment of the building. In recent months my wife and I have attended screenings of The Big Sleep and The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.  The audience tends to be older and much more attentive to the movie. Add an organ recital before the movie and at intermission, a live host who offers trivia on the movie being shown and reasonably priced concessions and you have an ideal movie going experience.

I'm with you guys to an extent. But I still like to go to the theatre for movies that are made for the big screen. Something like Avatar or Prometheus that has eye popping visuals works better for me in a theatre. But I will always wait until the movie is near the end of its run and the theatre is mostly empty before I go.

Also, there is a discount theatre near me that runs movies just after they have completed their runs in the more expensive theatres. Not quite as fancy but $4 a ticket. And I never buy concessions. Usually just bring my own snacks or eat before I go.

“I still like to go to the theatre for movies that are made for the big screen.”

Those are pretty much the only ones I make an exception for (most recently Star Wars and Spectre).

“I will always wait until the movie is near the end of its run and the theatre is mostly empty before I go.”

Me, too.

A neighboring town recently closed its old movie movie house (due to local politics). Unfortunately, I didn’t know about it until after it had closed.

I've always only gone to the discount theaters once a movie stopped playing in the big places. I think the only time I went to an expensive theater was to see the first Star Wars film. The way everyone kept pushing how incredible it was I couldn't wait to see it. After I did I couldn't (and still don't) understand why everyone kept telling me how great it is.

You have to be careful bringing your own snacks. I've seen people tossed out for doing that.

Commander Benson said:

3.  Tom Hanks, an actor I usually enjoy in anything he does, was a poor Walt Disney.  Part of the problem for me there was I well remember the real Walt Disney, from when he hosted Disneyland in the late '50's and The Wonderful World of Color  in the early '60's.  Mr. Hanks neither looked, nor sounded like the person he was portraying.  This is always a problem when an actor portrays someone with whom I am familiar.  It doesn't take much in the way of physical resemblance or vocal resemblance to the original for a good actor to rise above that.  But, in this case, Mr. Hanks did little more than slap on a moustache and play himself.  No matter how hard I tried, I just couldn't see him as Walt Disney.

I agree; Tom Hanks failed to capture Walt Disney, and didn't seem to be trying.

You can't always get an actor who has an exact resemblance to the person he's playing, but the performance should make the viewer forget about that, or at least stop caring about it.

One case in point: Denzel Washington in Malcolm X. Denzel Washington does not, in the slightest, resemble Malcolm X. Malcolm X was taller, lankier, lighter complected, and had naturally red hair. But the movie drew you in and had Denzel Washington stride in Malcolm X's shoes and you're swept along and the lack of resemblance was no longer an issue ...

... until the movie ended with newsreel footage of the real Malcolm X, undermining everything Denzel Washington did. What's Love Got to Do With It made the same mistake, sabotaging Angela Bassett's fine work with a wholly unnecessary shot of Tina Turner at the end.

At least Saving Mr. Banks kept to photographs of the principals over the closing credits. 

It's funny how biopics like to do that.  I quite enjoyed An Adventure in Space and Time, in which David Bradley portrayed actor William Hartnell.  As you can see from the pictures below, Bradley didn't look a whole lot like Our Bil  (nor sound like him, either)l, but what were the odds of finding someone who was a dead ringer who also happened to be a competent actor? Bradley did a good job so that you didn't worry about it while you were watching the film. Then at the end, they showed footage of the actual Hartnell, and it kind of took you out of it a little.

Off-topic, but since the Baron brought that movie up, I was hoping the producers of Doctor Who would have kept the cast of that movie together to do live-action reconstructions of missing episodes.

I didn't hate Saving Mr. Banks, but it could have been better.

I think Tom Hanks is a very good actor. I don't think he is a great actor.

Part of the problem is the way our brains say "Oh, look, it's Tom Hanks!" There are a number of actors who can disappear into a character using makeup, body language or just overwhelming acting ability. Tom Hanks isn't one of them.

I wonder if they had another actor in mind and Hanks was seen as more bankable.

Richard Willis said:

I didn't hate Saving Mr. Banks, but it could have been better.

I think Tom Hanks is a very good actor. I don't think he is a great actor.

Part of the problem is the way our brains say "Oh, look, it's Tom Hanks!" There are a number of actors who can disappear into a character using makeup, body language or just overwhelming acting ability. Tom Hanks isn't one of them.

I wonder if they had another actor in mind and Hanks was seen as more bankable.

It's more likely that they went for "bankable" first, got Tom Hanks on board, and stopped looking. 

Too many movies are full of "bankable" people that aren't always right for the parts, but get the jobs for their names. I think the Marvel movies work as well as they do because guys like Thor and Hawkeye weren't famous enough that people had trouble seeing them as their characters instead of "there's that famous guy from such and such again!"

And then although Robert Downey, Jr., was certainly famous before he portrayed Tony Stark, he looks close enough to the way the fictional character has been portrayed over the decades that, and his usually stellar acting can easily make both comic-books geeks well familiar with Iron Man as well as the general public easily forget the actor and focus on the character he's playing.  As least it works well enough for me.

If they'd used David Hasslehoff as Nick Fury we're be hearing a lot of jokes asking where the SHIELD talking cars and lifeguards were.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Groups

Latest Activity

Jeff of Earth-J replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Swamp Thing
"I took a couple of days off from this discussion to allow Tracy to overcome her aversion to Arcane…"
43 minutes ago
Peter Wrexham replied to Steve W's discussion A Cover a Day
"I can work with the themes of "Joe Kubert" in September and "First and Last…"
54 minutes ago
Peter Wrexham replied to Steve W's discussion A Cover a Day
"We've seen lots of roller coasters.  Here's another ride that's often found at…"
1 hour ago
Tracy of Moon-T replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Ultraman Tiga
"At the end of the episode, the crew members of GUTS reunite. The camera angle is low on the ground…"
1 hour ago
Peter Wrexham replied to Steve W's discussion A Cover a Day
"Steve, the last few lines of the index don't look quite right.  Here's how the…"
1 hour ago
Jeff of Earth-J replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Sandman (TV)
"EPISODE TWO:  First impression: man, that was short! It clocked in at only 35 minutes. I like…"
3 hours ago
Jeff of Earth-J replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Shaolin Cowboy
"...which brings us up to the latest series... "Cruel to be Kin" I read the first issue,…"
3 hours ago
Jeff of Earth-J replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Ultraman Tiga
"INHERITANCE OF SHADOW: "The mysterious man inherited the genes of an ancient race of people…"
3 hours ago
Jeff of Earth-J replied to Steve W's discussion A Cover a Day
4 hours ago
Jeff of Earth-J replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Dark Shadows
"One more thing about Scarlet Street...  When Edward G. Robinson asked to paint her, I thought…"
4 hours ago
Randy Jackson replied to Randy Jackson's discussion Did Paste Pot Pete/the Trapster ever admire Spider-Man's Webs?
"I don't recall Spider-Man meeting up with him in Amazing Spider-Man, at least not during the…"
5 hours ago
Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Dark Shadows
"I've seen through episode 636 now. The new experiment failed, Eve was skeletonized, Nicholas…"
7 hours ago

© 2022   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service