Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

Views: 48870

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

NEPTUNE'S DAUGHTER (1949). Esther Williams and Ricardo Montalban with Red Skelton and Betty Garrett and Keenan Wynn. Betty mistakes Red for Ricardo and causes problems with her sister, Esther. This movie introduced the song "Baby, It's Cold Outside," and seeing it performed in context shows the recent hubbub about it to be a lot of hooey. The song is performed twice, back-to-back, first with Ricardo trying to get Esther to stay a little longer and then with Betty trying to get Red to stay. Esther is quite in control and barely takes one sip of the "dreaded" drink. Red misses the drink provided altogether. Yes, there are water ballet sequences; it is an Esther Williams film, after all. There's also a polo match where Red has to fill in for Ricardo. Mel Blanc and Xavier Cugat also appear. It's a fun little movie. Oh, and Joi Lansing appears uncredited as a swimsuit model.

One more thing: the song won the 1950 Oscar for Best Original Song.

"...seeing it performed in context shows the recent hubbub about it to be a lot of hooey."

It's a lot of hooey anyway, AFAIAC.

Inspired by reading The Autobiography of James T. Kirk, I recently watched STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE (from the beginning up to when Spock helps repair the warp drive), STAR TREK: GENERATIONS (from the beginning up to when Kirk is lost), and STAR TREK: FIRST CONTACT (not because it’s Kirk-related, but because it ties into my next TV binge).

OTOH, it was the impetus for those great UNIVERSAL MONSTERS DVD box sets, so Thank You for that!

My wife got me one of those!

Holy crap, Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse is incredible.

That seems to the be universal opinion, but we haven't seen it yet.

THE BALLAD OF BUSTER SCRUGGS: Coen Bros. weirdness in the West, in five vignettes. Like any anthology, I liked some parts more than others. It was OK.

AQUAMAN: Are we talking about this anywhere? And if not, why not?

I have arbitrarily decided that Shin Godzilla is a Christmas movie, even though it isn't.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

TRADING PLACES: Tracy picked the Christmas movie this year. The main stipulation for a film to qualify as a "Christmas movie" in our house is that it must take place on or around the holiday itself. This requirement eliminates movies such as It's a Wonderful Life, The Godfather Part II and Rocky, but opens up such holiday classics as Eyes Wide Shut, Diner and Trading Places. Also, I found out just yesterday that Die Hard (which I have never seen) is also a "Christmas movie." Maybe next year.

Briefly, earlier in this thread.

Captain Comics said:

AQUAMAN: Are we talking about this anywhere? And if not, why not?

I watched "Ready Player One" last night; and, although it wasn't a bad film, it felt like other films I've seen diced up and cobbled together. Old school video game nostalgia ran rampant (I won't spoil, but if, as I was, you were a fan of the Atari 2600 game "Adventure" you will definitely be cheering) which brought to mind "Pixels". The film takes place in a video/internet realm, bringing to mind 'Wreck It Ralph"; and, it takes place in a dystopian future where a corporation is allowed to send you to debtor's prison (although there is proof of an actual government in the end). In the end, I just didn't feel the whole struggle was worth the effort, in spite of the fact that the film emphasized "real world consequences". If you have nothing better to do, and you're in the mood for harmless fantasy, give it a look (but then again, that's what led the citizens of this world's film into their predicament in the first place).

I wasn't turned on by the premise. I've read enough stories about virtual reality, and didn't want to see a movie about it.

CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG: Watching Mary Poppins last week put me in the mood to watch the similar Chitty Chitty Bang Bang for the first time in 50 years. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang was the first movie I ever saw in a drive-in. (My grandmother took me.) I remember it remarkably well for a movie I haven’t seen since 1968. I had a least two Chitty Chitty Bang Bang toy cars (of different sizes) when I was a kid. My favorite was the Hot-Wheels-sized one. I thought Chitty Chitty Bang Bang was cooler than both the Batmobile and the Mach 5.

I’ve known for a long time that the original book was written by Ian Fleming, but I didn’t realize until last night that it was produced by Cubby Broccoli. It also has another “James Bond” tie-in: the baron is played by Gert Frobe, Goldfinger himself. I like Chitty Chitty Bang Bang mare than Mary Poppins, and I think it’s good enough to rival The Wizard of Oz (if only it had been shown on TV every year as the Wizard was). I had a hardcover Chitty Chitty Bang Bang book, too, illustrated with stills from the movie. I don’t know if it was the original text or an abridged version. It’s long gone.

Heh! I had the car in two sizes, too.

Of course it's an Ian Fleming movie! There's a cool car, and the heroine's name is "Truly Scrumptious."

(I know. She's not in the original source novel. They did, however, offer the part to Julie Andrews)



Jeff of Earth-J said:

CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG: Watching Mary Poppins last week put me in the mood to watch the similar Chitty Chitty Bang Bang for the first time in 50 years. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang was the first movie I ever saw in a drive-in. (My grandmother took me.) I remember it remarkably well for a movie I haven’t seen since 1968. I had a least two Chitty Chitty Bang Bang toy cars (of different sizes) when I was a kid. My favorite was the Hot-Wheels-sized one. I thought Chitty Chitty Bang Bang was cooler than both the Batmobile and the Mach 5.

I’ve known for a long time that the original book was written by Ian Fleming, but I didn’t realize until last night that it was produced by Cubby Broccoli. It also has another “James Bond” tie-in: the baron is played by Gert Frobe, Goldfinger himself. I like Chitty Chitty Bang Bang mare than Mary Poppins, and I think it’s good enough to rival The Wizard of Oz (if only it had been shown on TV every year as the Wizard was). I had a hardcover Chitty Chitty Bang Bang book, too, illustrated with stills from the movie. I don’t know if it was the original text or an abridged version. It’s long gone.

I'm glad you seem to have liked it a little better than I did. I had read the book and enjoyed it before I knew the movie would be made (I'm one of those people who likes to watch the movie before reading the book--you're always disappointed in the movie if you do it the other way). I thought the movie was really thin--not visually, but in terms of depth. I really didn't enjoy it.

JohnD said:

I watched "Ready Player One" last night; and, although it wasn't a bad film, it felt like other films I've seen diced up and cobbled together. Old school video game nostalgia ran rampant (I won't spoil, but if, as I was, you were a fan of the Atari 2600 game "Adventure" you will definitely be cheering) which brought to mind "Pixels". The film takes place in a video/internet realm, bringing to mind 'Wreck It Ralph"; and, it takes place in a dystopian future where a corporation is allowed to send you to debtor's prison (although there is proof of an actual government in the end). In the end, I just didn't feel the whole struggle was worth the effort, in spite of the fact that the film emphasized "real world consequences". If you have nothing better to do, and you're in the mood for harmless fantasy, give it a look (but then again, that's what led the citizens of this world's film into their predicament in the first place).

“Of course it's an Ian Fleming movie! There's a cool car, and the heroine's name is ‘Truly Scrumptious.’ (I know. She's not in the original source novel. They did, however, offer the part to Julie Andrews)”

You know, it didn't even occur to me that "Truly Scruptious" is an "Ian Fleming" name until you mentioned it. So she's not in the source novel, eh? (The book I had must have been based on the movie, as I sispected.) So Julie Andrews turned down the role... too bad. I found out only recently (watching the Mary Poppins DVD extras)that she played Guinevere in Camelot for years on Broadway, yet wasn't offered the movie role.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2021   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service