Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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Yeah, I have copies of both the English and Japanese versions, and the endings are basically the same.

EASY RIDER: After Electra Glide in Blue a couple of weeks ago I just had to re-watch Easy Rider again. (I watched it for the first time in junior high scool, I re-watched it in college, and I re-watched it again over the weekend.) I read the Mad magazine adaptation long before seeing the movie, so I knew to expect some good music. It must have been shown over Thanksgiving one year because I remember watching it late at night in the company of my brother-in-law. He told me that Jimi Hendrix was considered to be the greatest guitar player of all time. I bought the soundtrack album shoertly after that, and I bought Are You Experienced? shortly after that. The second time I saw it I was going through a “Jack Nicholson phase,” but I didn’t really appreciate it until this past weekend. It shuld always be shown on a double bill with Electra Glide in Blue.

Another one I've never seen.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

EASY RIDER: After Electra Glide in Blue a couple of weeks ago I just had to re-watch Easy Rider again. (I watched it for the first time in junior high scool, I re-watched it in college, and I re-watched it again over the weekend.) I read the Mad magazine adaptation long before seeing the movie, so I knew to expect some good music. It must have been shown over Thanksgiving one year because I remember watching it late at night in the company of my brother-in-law. He told me that Jimi Hendrix was considered to be the greatest guitar player of all time. I bought the soundtrack album shoertly after that, and I bought Are You Experienced? shortly after that. The second time I saw it I was going through a “Jack Nicholson phase,” but I didn’t really appreciate it until this past weekend. It shuld always be shown on a double bill with Electra Glide in Blue.

Another one I've never seen.”

It’s very counter-culture. I guess you know it stars Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper (as “Captain America” and Billy), and is directed by Hopper. Hopper utilizes an annoying method to switch between scenes throughout, otherwise it’s a respectable directorial debut. The two score big on a drug deal, then bike across the southwest from Mexico to New Orleans for Mardi Gras, picking up Jack Nicholson along the way. I honestly don’t think you’d care for it much… unless you’re simply curious about its reputation. (I can see you watching it for that reason.) I didn’t care for it too much the first two times I watched it, yet I watched it a third. After seeing it for the first time, Tracy said that she gets to pick the movies for a while.

Oh, man, Easy Rider. I liked it more than I expected to, knowing the ending beforehand. And frankly, any chance to visit New Orleans -- even tripping out in St. Louis Cemetery -- is well worth it for me. 

My most recent movie was Under the Silver Lake, a 2019 LA noir starring Andrew Garfield as a pretty repulsive layabout who starts obsessing over the mysterious disappearance of a girl in his apartment complex. Don't expect coherence -- or rather, expect to be required to build your own from the plethora of clues and breadcrumbs in the film, or reject the idea of coherence altogether. Worth watching once, to determine whether you want to watch it a hundred times or never want to see it again. I'm... on the fence. Available to stream free on Amazon Prime if you've got that.

ETA: Comics content: Garfield's character at one point puts his hand onto some sticky goo someone smeared on his car door; he later wakes up with his hand stuck to an issue of Amazing Spider-Man. 

Easy Rider opened in Cannes in May 1969, followed by staggered releases in many countries that year. Its US debut was apparently in New York City on July 14, 1969, fifty years ago yesterday.

I think I saw it in early 1970, after getting out of the Army. The ending, now well known, was not generally known at that time. I remember how angry it made the audience, including me. We erupted from the theater as almost an angry mob. I realized shortly that the movie was intentionally pushing our buttons. A good illustration of film as political propaganda. We were siding with lovable smugglers of heroin, just because murderous KKK-types were worse.

Rob and Richard, you two guys need to watch Electra Glide in Blue (if you haven't seen it) in comparison.

I watched Electra Glide in Blue when it first came out. It didn't impress me. I've rewatched Easy Rider a few times over the years and have (somewhere) the vinyl LP of the songs.

I saw Easy Rider for the first time a year or two ago, and was underwhelmed. I felt the same way I did with Last Tango in Paris and Pulp Fiction: I didn't see it when it was out, and seeing it all these years later, I didn't get what the big deal was.

Just scratched Zombieland off my to-do list, a movie that's about to have a sequel (somehow). One reason it got on my list is that sometime in the past, I noticed that a lot of people who were or would become famous were in it. And I got fooled.

Yes, Woody Harrelson (playing Woody Harrelson). Yes, Bill Murray (yes, playing Bill Murray, literally). Yes, John Cera, when he was making a living playing hapless nerds. And then this girl, who was made up to look like Mila Kunis, and I kept saying to my wife, "look, they're trying to make her look like Mila Kunis!" And she rolled her eyes, thinking I had some sort of thing for Mila Kunis.

But that wasn't it at all. It was Emma Stone! She was a lot taller than Cera, which threw me off (she is not)\. and they did, I swear, do what they could to make her look like Mila Kunis (whom I've only seen, actually, in whiskey commercials, but am somehow familiar with). Her black wig, her eye makeup -- aside from the wandering eye, sometimes she looked exactly like Kunis.

But I should have realized that my Peter Tingle about this actress meant that I DID know her, but placed the info somewhere else. I got fooled. and I have no excuses -- just regrets.

Zombieland sound like a lot of fun. I've added it to my streaming list. Amazingly, they're in post-production on a sequel (Zombieland: Double Tap) ten years later, with the same cast!

Emma Stone had dark hair in Easy A*, the first thing I saw her in, which was released a year after Zombieland. She was so good in that that I was sure she had a big future.

* A high school take off on The Scarlet Letter. She becomes popular by pretending to be, as they say, easy. 

I remember wanting to see Easy A, both because of Tina Fry's involvement, and the fact that it's such a clever title.

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