Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

Views: 36995

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

...I saw the Fathom Events/TCM 50th Anniversary theatrical showing of HELLO, DOLLY! JD, as far as " understanding 1969 " goes...do you think there's anyone in the world not a critic of some type who saw both the two , 1969, okay " (The Stooges)- oriented movies you cite (or the original WOODSTOCK documentary) as well as HD! During the same era? :') They had somewhat different , reps , ' Ya think?????????

...Thank you. My point was, the term rather passed out of general usage after " living together ". ad we know it, became common in the Seventies...though, obviously. what are presumably old laws relating to this remain on the books in 7 and D.C.

  I recall (though I never saw it) a short-loved My Big Fat Greek...Marriage??...sitcom having a short, unsuccessful CBS run after the movie. I presume this was ignored? And that the daughter's age was soap-opera-style accelersted?

   The 70s rock band Tedbome's big hit " Come And Get Your Love " had a B-side titled, Fay To Dah Life , whose chorus went. or like. , I'm living a day to day life/With my common law wife ", which was a little archaic even in 1972.



ClarkKent_DC said:

ClarkKent_DC said:

  • Family patriarch Gus discovers the priest who officiated at his wedding to Maria 50 years ago wasn't ordained and didn't sign the marriage license; thus, they aren't legally married.

The Baron said:

Wouldn't they be considered "common law married" by that point, or is that not a real thing?

It is and it isn't. The wife Maria makes a crack in the movie that they must be married because of "time served."

It appears that Maria and Gus have met all the standards for common law marriage, as listed here in FindLaw: They are old enough to be married; they are of sound mind; they fully intended to be married to each other; they have lived together for a long time; they have commingled finances; they have always represented themselves to family, friends and the world at large as a married couple; and neither is married to someone else.

However, common law marriage is recognized only in seven states and the District of Columbia, and Illinois (where My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 is set) is not one of those places. 

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...Thank you. My point was, the term rather passed out of general usage after " living together ". ad we know it, became common in the Seventies...though, obviously. what are presumably old laws relating to this remain on the books in 7 and D.C.

It's more like the old laws are on the books in the 43 states that don't recognize common law marriage.

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

  I recall (though I never saw it) a short-loved My Big Fat Greek...Marriage??...sitcom having a short, unsuccessful CBS run after the movie. I presume this was ignored? And that the daughter's age was soap-opera-style accelersted?

Yes, there was a sitcom based on My Big Fat Greek Wedding, titled My Big Fat Greek Life, which came and went in 2003, lasting only seven episodes on CBS. It had most of the main cast from the movie, although Steven Eckholdt played the husband instead of John Corbett, and for some odd reason, the couple at the center of the story had different names in the TV show, per Wikipedia. I never watched it either, but I think it's safe to say nothing that transpired in that show had anything to do with the movie sequel. 

As the movie sequel comes 14 years after the original film, the daughter's age in the sequel isn't too far out of line.  

Watched Green Hornet (2011). I swear to God, I could have written this myself. No surprises whatsoever,.

And a cast of characters I did not like. Am I just too old? I get the impression that if you really enjoy Seth Rogen's stoner/slacker act, maybe you'd enjoy the movie -- because Rogen's character's worst qualities were front and center the whole time. I found it tiresome and implausible.

Also, as mentioned, I think I could have written the script myself. And I wouldn't have been proud of myself for doing so.

I didn't see Seth Rogen's "Green Hornet" because I was reasonably sure it wasn't going to be "my" Green Hornet. 

Also, it seemed to me to be flawed in the same way the last "Lone Ranger" movie was flawed: As a fan like us, Rogen grew up watching The Green Hornet. Unlike us, he got in a position where he could do what the average fan could only dream of doing, and make his own "Green Hornet" movie. Unfortunately, that meant bending it to fit his schtick, which in Rogen's case is the stoner/slacker act. 

Bad Times at the El Royale:

Not entirely what I expected from the trailer. This plays like Drew Goddard trying to be Tarantino. It has a great set-up and strong performances, and it's not bad, but I can't say I took much away from it. It's interesting to see Chris "Thor" Hemsworth play a faux Charles Manson.

Bad Times at the El Royale brings up something you guys could help me with.

I recently saw Grand Hotel (the one with Greta Garbo) and was delighted to see so many bits of dialogue and situational tropes when they were used for the first time. (I got used to saying, "so that's where that comes from!")

The thing is, there are a lot of hotel movies, which probably all involve multiple storylines that intersect at the crossroads of the hotel. (I assume Bad Times is in that vein, but I don't really know.) Heck, even Alan Moore's Lost Girls used the structure.

So, which ones are worth watching? I've seen Grand Hotel, and plan to see Bad Times when it comes back around on the gee-tar. I've heard good things about the recent Grand Budapest Hotel and hope to see it. There are others out there to see -- which should be seen, and which avoided?

We saw The Farewell, a very charming film that, like My Big Fat Greek Wedding and its sequel, explores complicated family dynamics a non-American culture.

Awkwafina stars as Billi, a struggling writer in New York who is close to her dear, sainted grandmother, Nai Nai, despite the fact Nai Nai lives in China. As the film begins, the two are talking on the phone. Billi overhears things that make her question what Nai Nai is doing, but she demurs. Nai Nai is at the hospital with her sister, getting a CT scan. Afterward, the sister tells Nai Nai it's nothing, just "benign shadows."

It isn't. It's Stage 4 lung cancer, and the prognosis is that Nai Nai has only three months to live.

The family resolves to NOT tell Nai Nai this news. Instead, they announce her grandson -- Billi's cousin  -- is getting married, and the family goes to see Nai Nai in China for a goodbye party disguised as a wedding celebration. 

I don't want to say more, because you really should enjoy this movie for yourself. Awkwafina is better known for being a scene stealer in things like Crazy Rich Asians and Ocean's 8, but she rises to the occasion in this more dramatic role. Zhao Shuzhen is a delight as Nai Nai, and her rapport with Awkwafina is winning and very believable, as is Awkwafina's distress at keeping up this deception. However, the family in this story insists that it is, under Chinese mores, the right thing to do. You might come away in agreement ... or not. 

I have Grand Hotel PVRed but have never seen it. I heard much about it as a kid, because I grew up on the Canada/US border, not far from a Michigan hotel that was widely rumored (rumors from my parents' childhood) to have been used as a location for some shots. As far as I can determine, the film was made entirely in Hollywood. Years later, Somewhere in Time (1980) did use the Michigan hotel in question as a location.

I recommend Grand Budapest Hotel.

I had expected Bad Times at the El Royale to be a darker version of this sort of movie. Kind of, but not quite. The multiple stories are really one story.

Wicked, Wicked (1973) is an interesting comedy-thriller in the vein you describe. It gets more play now, after disappearing from public consciousness for decades, because its split-screen approach requires the full-size screen be used (or letterbox-- but how many movies were broadcast that way when TV was in its old ratio?)

Captain Comics said:

Bad Times at the El Royale brings up something you guys could help me with.

I recently saw Grand Hotel (the one with Greta Garbo) and was delighted to see so many bits of dialogue and situational tropes when they were used for the first time. (I got used to saying, "so that's where that comes from!")

The thing is, there are a lot of hotel movies, which probably all involve multiple storylines that intersect at the crossroads of the hotel. (I assume Bad Times is in that vein, but I don't really know.) Heck, even Alan Moore's Lost Girls used the structure.

So, which ones are worth watching? I've seen Grand Hotel, and plan to see Bad Times when it comes back around on the gee-tar. I've heard good things about the recent Grand Budapest Hotel and hope to see it. There are others out there to see -- which should be seen, and which avoided?

Love & Other Drugs features Jake Gyllenhaal as Jamie Randall, a medical school dropout who becomes a pharmaceutical sales rep for Pfizer. It seems to be about his rise as a player in the field, with seasoned manager Bruce Winston (Oliver Platt) showing him the ropes, but it veers into being a romantic comedy when Gyllenhall encounters Maggie Murdock, who is played by Anne Hathaway.

Maggie is sprightly and always up for a booty call but, unfortunately, has Parkinson's disease. Their developing no-strings-attached relationship founders as she knows but he fails to accept that Parkinson's only gets worse. But love conquers all. It's not too bad, but somewhat uneven. 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2019   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service