Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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Yesterday afternoon i watched October Sky. It'd been a while since I saw it. It's a great, underrated film. It's the story of 4 boys in late 50s/early 60s who build rockets after being inspired by the launch of Sputnick and the space race.

 

Last night I saw Black Swan. Pretty weird little film. It holds your attention but I can't say it was as awesome as most of the critics let me to believe.

...I saw Matt McCormick's film SOME DAYS ARE BETTER THAN OTHERS , starring Carrie Brownstein and James Mercer .

  Rather an " indie movie " .

  Has it even played NYC or LA yet ?

...I saw theatrically:

WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS: A MAN WITHIN

http://www.williamsburroughsthemovie.com ,

  a pretty much " official " biograpy-documentary of the quasi-SF writer , Mr. Cheerful himself .

  I don't think , actually , I've ever read any of his fiction...

Saw Thor last night. Another good installment to the Marvel films. I'm not sure I thought it was as good as the review made it out to be but it's certaintly an entertaining flick. The best part was that the two relatively uknown leads that played Thor and Loki nailed thier roles. Also, stay after the credits.  

...I saw the French-language film:

  OF GODS AND MEN

over the weekend , and I think I'll see Thor...matinee ( Berkeley ) price , flat...to-day of tom'w , if not today .

For Mother's Day, we saw Jumping the Broom. It was more entertaining than I expected, especially because of the antics of the mother of the bride, played by Angela Bassett, and the mother of the groom, played by Loretta Devine.

 

The story begins with attorney Sabrina (Paula Patton), embarrassed and ashamed after her latest one-night stand. She makes a vow to God to "save her cookies" for her future husband, but asks God to give a clear, unmistakable sign of just who that is. She gets her sign, and soon begins a whirlwind relationship with the handsome Jason (Laz Alonso), an investment broker. Five months later, she gets a job offer in China; Jason, in response, proposes. 

 

A month after that is the wedding day, at her family's home in Martha's Vineyard. Supervising the chaos is Sabrina's mother, Claudine Watson, played by Angela Bassett in full Hateful Evil Rhymes-With-Witch mode. But then, Jason's mother, Pam Taylor, is the kind of postal worker who gives the agency its reputation for being full of bitter psychos with hair-trigger tempers. Pam works up a full head of steam over the fact that she hasn't met Sabrina or her family, and perceives every gesture from them as a slight -- and a reason to get more worked up.

 

This clash of the Momzillas, populated with numerous "Oh, no, she didn't!" moments, barrels along as poor Sabrina and Jason have to contend with gossiping friends and relatives (They're not sleeping together? She must be pregnant! He must be on the down low!), family secrets, attempted hookups, hurt feelings -- and the battle of wills between the one mother who thinks the other family isn't good enough for her daughter and the other mother who thinks they think they're too good for her son and need to be knocked off their pedestal.

 

(By the way, Angela Bassett is Amanda Waller in the Green Lantern movie. Although she is slender where the comics' Waller is, as Ms. Bassett puts it, "big boned," never you doubt that she can bring the fierce. I'd be scared of her if I didn't love her so much.)

...I saw Thor , liked loads , more...in other lines !!!!!!!!!
Voyage of the Dawntreader- It was pretty good. I remember this being my favorite of the Narnia books as a kid.

This weekend I saw Hangover Part 2. It was pretty funny but followed pretty much the same formula as the first one. It was not as good as the first though. Most of the events were over-the-top. While the first one was itself over the tope it felt like most of what happened was somewhat possible. The second time around most of what happens is absurd but I'd be lying if I said I didn't laugh. Like I said before, it's pretty funny.

 

The other night I watched a film called the Jonses. It stars Demi Moore and David Duchovoney. It's about a "family" that moves to a town and entice the towns folk to buy the newest clothing/gadgest/cars etc. In fact they aren't a family but indivduals hired by a company to pose as a family to sell the latest and greatest. The title, if you haven't guessed it, comes from the saying "keeping up with the Joneses". It's a clever concept but the execution is a bit unbelievable. It drags a bit too and becomes a love story of sorts. It still is an interesting look at our society's fascination with staying up to date woth the newest stuff.

The Thief of Bagdad (1940) -- Some of the special effects work looks shaky now, but this thing must have looked amazing in 1940.  Heck, some of it still looks amazing.  An old-fashioned style of fantasy filmmaking, but I'm an old-fashioned guy, so that's OK by me.

(From the perspective of 2011, I have to admit that it's a little jarring to hear and see Bagdad and Basra depicted as fabulous fairy tale cities.)

The Baron said:
I never was a big Milton Berle fan, but there's a funny story of how he encountered DeCarlo on the studio lot one day while she was in her full Lily Munster make-up and regalia, and said to her: "Hi Yvonne! Working today?"

Since you mentioned Berle, I watched his movie Always Leave Them Laughing yesterday. Berle plays a third-rate comic who gets by using other comics' material. He re-used so many old gags, many I've seen the Three Stooges do, I started imagining that it would have been a great solo vehicle for Curly Howard. Then, about three-quarters of the way through the movie, Bert Lahr's character mentions Ted Healy. There are bits that Curly did; there are bits that Shemp did. It's not a great movie, but it's not too bad, either. Virginia Mayo has a really hot dance bit in it, too.
I think this movie's genesis was that old chestnut that lingered until his death that Berle stole other comics' material.  That joke was always trotted out when Berle appeared on the Dean Martin Roasts. 

PowerBook Pete (The Mad Mod) said:
The Baron said:
I never was a big Milton Berle fan, but there's a funny story of how he encountered DeCarlo on the studio lot one day while she was in her full Lily Munster make-up and regalia, and said to her: "Hi Yvonne! Working today?"

Since you mentioned Berle, I watched his movie Always Leave Them Laughing yesterday. Berle plays a third-rate comic who gets by using other comics' material. He re-used so many old gags, many I've seen the Three Stooges do, I started imagining that it would have been a great solo vehicle for Curly Howard. Then, about three-quarters of the way through the movie, Bert Lahr's character mentions Ted Healy. There are bits that Curly did; there are bits that Shemp did. It's not a great movie, but it's not too bad, either. Virginia Mayo has a really hot dance bit in it, too.

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