Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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That does sound interesting. 

Speaking of transformations, Werewolf of London presents an interesting technique prior to time-lapse photography. what they did was have the werewolf pass behind certain objects (such as walls or trees) in its dash through the yard and switched to a different reel as the view was obscured.

Not great, but "better than it sounds" would be my verdict, too. It's interesting to see Columbia Studios attempt a Universal-style horror movie (sort of how it's interesting to watch MGM's Mark of the Vampire). It comes closer to traditional werewolf legends, rather than the Hollywood/Universal version of it, and there's great fun in watching the fight with the werewolf. No matter how hard they edit and frame the scene, once you notice that the large, wolfish dog playing the werewolf is wagging its tail  (do I get treatsies now?), you cannot un-see it.

Richard Willis said:

I recorded (from TCM) and watched Cry of the Werewolf (1944). It's an interesting take on werewolves, from Columbia, not Universal. Transformations are shown in shadows, etc, and the werewolves are played by....wolves. The bullets flying aren't silver.  A lot better than it sounds. 

I missed the wagging tale. 

THE INVISIBLE MAN RETURNS: Vincent Price plays a man falsely accused of murdering his brother. His friend is the brother of the original Invisible Man, and has been working on perfecting the invisibility formula. He cannot yet return someone to visibility, but feels he is close, close enough that he turns Price invisible so that he can escape. He's on a tight timeline, though, because the formula is slowly driving Price insane, All of this is antecedent action; by the time the story opens, Price is already invisible and has escaped from custody. A worthy successor to the original. 

Without giving too much away, this Invisible Man invents a high-tech suit that manipulates light, rather than taking a potion.

Richard Willis said:

Just saw The Invisible Man (2020). It's a very good re-imagining of the story, especially of the ruthlessness of the title character.

Just watched How to Talk to Girls at Parties (2017), based upon Neil Gaiman's story of the same name. The title has nothing to do with the story, which is actually about an alien visit and the punk scene in Croydon, England, in the late 70s. Very different and entertaining.

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN: Actually, once I got past the fact this movie is a screwball/romantic comedy rather than horror, it's not half bad. the dialogue is often witty and clever. Margaret Hamilton and Shemp Howard are featured in bit parts. 

THE INVISIBLE AGENT: This one is set during WWII (1942). Jon Hall plays the grandson of the original Invisible Man. He goes behind enemy lines and falls in love with Ilona Massey, but then again, who wouldn't? Luckily, these Nazis are about as menacing as those on Hogan's Heroes. Sit cedric Hardwicke and Peter Lorre are the heavies. Better than i had remembered.

Was Lorre a Japanese in that one?

Jeff of Earth-J said:

THE INVISIBLE AGENT: This one is set during WWII (1942). Jon Hall plays the grandson of the original Invisible Man. He goes behind enemy lines and falls in love with Ilona Massey, but then again, who wouldn't? Luckily, these Nazis are about as menacing as those on Hogan's Heroes. Sit cedric Hardwicke and Peter Lorre are the heavies. Better than i had remembered.

Yes. (How did you guess?)

Because I own the Universal collection of these movies, but haven't watched them in a while.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Yes. (How did you guess?)

Interesting. According to a post of mine to that thread (from 2012), Tracy and I "stopped short" of watching the Invisible Man series a couple of years earlier. No wonder she doesn't remember them!

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