Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

Views: 41151

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Right now, I'm watching The Taking of Pelham 123 -- again. This is the third version, the one with Denzel Washington as the hero and John Travolta as the villain. I've seen all three -- the original, with Walter Matthau as the hero and Robert Shaw as the villain; the TV movie remake with Edward James Olmos as the hero and Vincent D'Onofrio; and this one. I also read the book.

Interesting in that in the book and first two versions, the heist is enough, but in the third version, the heist is just a cover for a bigger heist.

Ride Along, featuring Ice Cube as a gruff Atlanta PD detective, and Kevin Hart as his would-be brother-in-law. Ice Cube doesn't like Kevin Hart because he's a cop wannabe whose entire knowledge of policing comes from video games, he's engaged to Cube's sister and Cube doesn't think he's good enough, and well, he's Kevin Hart.

The plot, such as is is, is that Cube gives Kevin Hart a day to prove himself, and, as these kind of slob comedies go, things go bad and then get worse before they get better. Cube is on the trail of a weapons dealer, and it's a great thrill when he shows up, because it's Laurence Fishburne -- it was a pleasure to have a real actor on the scene.

One must-see: Unbroken, the true story of Louis Zamperini, a real-life Captain America. This is a man who:

  • was a record-breaking high-school track star
  • competed in the 1936 Olympics
  • was a bombardier in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II
  • crash landed in the Pacific Ocean and spent six and a half weeks lost at sea with two crewmates in a rubber raft
  • was captured by the Japanese Navy and spent nearly two years as a prisoner of war

Any one of those stories would make a movie. Having all of those adventures is stunning and eye-opening and the movies is spellbinding. Don't miss it.

Mr. Zamperini was to be the Grand Marshall of the Pasadena's Rose Parade on January 1st. Instead his family rode in a car in the parade while a soldier led a riderless horse. That horse almost made me tear up.

Louis Zamperini died July 2. We were reading his obituary in the paper on July 4 while driving to the beach and almost had to stop the car, his life was so fascinating.

Jack Kirby's life story would make a great movie.

A couple days ago, I re-watched The Grand Budapest Hotel (first time since I saw it in the theater). This...might be my favorite Wes Anderson movie yet. At the very least, it is right on par with The Royal Tenenbaums, which was (and maybe is) my favorite of his movies. I just love the scope of this movie. Every scene is beautifully rendered and depicted. It's like watching a great painting in movie form, without becoming about the beautiful pictures.

Rod Taylor passed away Wednesday. Always thought Ben Grimm looked like him. The Time Machine and Colossus and the Amazon Queen both came out about a year before FF#1 and Jack loved watching movies. 
 
PowerBook Pete, the Mad Mod said:

WORLD WITHOUT END - A group of astronaut/scientists begin their return to Earth from Mars and hit a time displacement taking them into Earth's future where man has pretty much become two species--one living above ground and the other below. So, it sounds like Planet of the Apes and The Time Machine, but this film was made in 1956. Rod Taylor, interestingly, plays one of the scientists. Edward Bernds, who directed several Three Stooges shorts directed this movie.

EMPIRE OF PASSION - A young man returning from war has an affair with an older woman, decides he has to kill her husband, and talks her into helping him do it. They continue to see each other secretly, but there is gossip around the small community, and the murdered man's ghost begins haunting them. The director was Nagisa Oshima, who had previously directed In the Realm of the Senses, which I saw at a campus film festival in 1983 or 84.

THE THING - I saw the 2011 prequel/remake over the weekend. It didn't strike me as good as either the 1951 or 1982 versions. They don't even get the Antarctic lighting right. They appeared to be trying to add Alien into the plot, too.

I watched Tropic Thunder again today. I love that movie. It's a shame comedies don't win Oscars, because it deserved something, it really did. Especially Robert Downey Jr. and the whole "I'm a dude disguised as a dude playing another dude" schtick, and Tom Cruise (and I did not realize that was him the first time I saw it! really!) Comedy gold!

Cops and Robbers, a forgettable '70s movie about a pair of NYPD uniformed officers who have a midlife crisis and decide to get rich quick. They steal bonds from a securities firm on the day of a major parade, which covers their getaway.

I read the novel many years ago -- it's by Donald Westlake, who is known for caper stories -- which made me interested. But I'm finding the movie pretty dull. 

Love that movie!

ClarkKent_DC said:

I watched Tropic Thunder again today. I love that movie. It's a shame comedies don't win Oscars, because it deserved something, it really did. Especially Robert Downey Jr. and the whole "I'm a dude disguised as a dude playing another dude" schtick, and Tom Cruise (and I did not realize that was him the first time I saw it! really!) Comedy gold!

I saw the original and the Washington/Travolta one. I think I prefer the original. Though the remake was decent.
 
ClarkKent_DC said:

Right now, I'm watching The Taking of Pelham 123 -- again. This is the third version, the one with Denzel Washington as the hero and John Travolta as the villain. I've seen all three -- the original, with Walter Matthau as the hero and Robert Shaw as the villain; the TV movie remake with Edward James Olmos as the hero and Vincent D'Onofrio; and this one. I also read the book.

Interesting in that in the book and first two versions, the heist is enough, but in the third version, the heist is just a cover for a bigger heist.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service