Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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"And, honestly, the animated series isn't particularly good."

Oh, that's about what I expected.

It's not especially animated, either.

Jeff of Earth-J said:


“What that Archive appears to be is a collection of the lead stories from the first 11 issues of Planet of the Apes magazine, which adapted the first two movies, which were reprinted -- IN COLOR -- in Planet of the Apes comic book #1-11."

I don’t think so, Cap. The artists for those adaptations were George Tuska and Alfredo Alcala. The original “Terror on the POTA” stories were illustrated by Ploog and Sutton and Trimpe in that order.

I think you're right. I was led astray by the fact that the only color POTA comics Marvel published are the 11 listed on mycomicshop.com as reprints from Planet of the Apes magazine #1-11 of the adaptation of the first two movies with art by Ploog, Alcala and Tuska. Also, "Terror on the Planet of the Apes" was listed as the story title in the first issue's contents.

But I think the info was sketchy enough that I saw what I expected to see. Thinking back now -- from not having read the comics for 40 years! -- the "main" story in POTA magazine was a story by Doug Moench about an ape and a human who were best buds and had adventures and defeated prejudice together. But that is undoubtedly the "Terror" referred to in the mycomicshop listing, not the movie adaptation. "Terror" and the movie adaptation, and another back-up called "The Secret" by Tuska, ran concurrently in the early issues of POTA  (as far as I can tell)-- but "Terror" outlasted the others and ran for perhaps the entire run of the magazine (29 issues).

I could confirm all this by just pulling out the magazines. But that would require me to leave my chair, and I decline to do so.

Anyhow, I'm surprised now to see Ploog listed as one of the artists for both "Terror" and the adaptation, since he wasn't the fastest artist in the world. (I wouldn't have thought about it at the time.) I guess his co-artists did a lot of heavy lifting.

A wiki article I found addressed the art style mentioned above. Evidently the art was shot directly from Ploog's pencils! So the wash/charcoal effect was just layered pencilling, which is pretty awesome.

On Ploog again, when I read the Wiki about him I found out about his close connection to Will Eisner. Ploog's Wiki reproduces his Eisneresque splash page from Werewolf by Night. I was also informed that Ploog followed Eisner into the military publication PS Magazine, which is rich with Eisner art. This is a maintenance publication for military equipment. Already being an Eisner fan, when I was in the Army I "liberated" a few of these, which I still have.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PS,_The_Preventive_Maintenance_Monthly



Captain Comics said:


...the "main" story in POTA magazine was a story by Doug Moench about an ape and a human who were best buds and had adventures and defeated prejudice together. But that is undoubtedly the "Terror" referred to in the mycomicshop listing...


That description fills me with terror.


It was better than it sounds, though probably not as good as I recall. They were on the run because Brutus, the head of police but also the head of an Ape Dominance Klan-like organization had framed them for the murder of his wife (he was the real killer, of course). This led them into various adventures with mutants, the Lawgiver, an ape 'n' human pair of riverboaters, multi-eyed creatures, and an interspecies band of gypsies that included a gibbon.


Captain Comics said:


...the "main" story in POTA magazine was a story by Doug Moench about an ape and a human who were best buds and had adventures and defeated prejudice together. But that is undoubtedly the "Terror" referred to in the mycomicshop listing...


That description fills me with terror.

ESCAPE FROM THE PLANET OF THE APES: This movie manages to be not only the flip side of Pierre Boulle’s original, but of the original movie as well. It also makes the beginning of a new timeline. There are many discrepancies between the future history Cornelius relates and the one that plays out in the next two movies. No problem there: when the apes landed in 1973 they created a divergent timeline. But there are enough discrepancies from the first to movies to make the case that they might have come from a divergent future timeline as well (one other than that shown in the first two movies, I mean).

Cornelius explains that, “as an archeologist” (his words), he had access to scrolls proving that man was once the ascendant species on the planet. This is clearly not the case to anyone who has seen the first film. At the end of the original movie, Dr. Zaius destroyed the cave of evidence Cornelius uncovered by himself, and said that he and Zira would still be charged with heresy. My explanation is that Zaius relented, and also confided in them the secrets of the past he knew from his position as the Chief Defender of the Faith. The fact that the heresy trial was not even mentioned in the first sequel bears this out.

But it’s also possible that the Earth Cornelius, Zira and Milo landed on in 1973 was not exactly the same Earth Taylor and Brent left from. What indicates this to me is the space agency of the reality which launched Taylor and Brent’s missions was A.N.S.AA, not N.A.S.A. that of the reality in which the chimps landed. Each of the films ends with a “moment”: the Statue of Liberty, the destruction of Earth, the baby chimp Milo saying “Mama.”

Just because I’ve been posting about Planet of the Apes films lately doesn’t mean I’m done with Frankenstein (or King Kong, either). Tracy was out of town for a week, but now that she’s back we’re picking up where we left off.

FRANKENSTEIN VS. THE MUMMY: This 2015 offering has a B-movie plot but state of the art special effects. Victor Frankenstein looks like the Ninth Doctor’s kid brother (or maybe Christopher Eccleston’s understudy). The “versus” part comes 132 minutes into the film, 12 minutes from the end.

FRANKENSTEIN: THE REAL STORY: This is a History Channel documentary, the first I’ve ever seen. I’ve heard about them, though, and this one lives up to their reputation. It’s difficult to take seriously because it’s narrated by a guy in a voice you would expect to hear promoting the next big summer blockbuster. I forget what the final tag line was, but delivered in this vloice it made both of us laugh out loud.

Another feature traced Frankenstein in film from Thomas Edison’s silent version through Kenneth Brannaugh’s version with Robert DeNiro. It led us to order four more movies, so you can look forward to more posts in the weeks to come.

..... the space agency of the reality which launched Taylor and Brent’s missions.....

I didn't mention it before, but it was a stretch that both missions going through the space-time warp would crash within a short distance of each other rather than on the other side of the planet or the middle of an ocean.

Beneath is interesting in that the star, James Franciscus, comes off as sort of a poor man's Charlton Heston. And the fact that Heston appears in the movie is a little off the wall too. I wonder how many sequels have featured the star of the first movie in only a cameo type role to support another actor who is copying him.

Escape might have been more interesting if Cornelius and Zira had traveled to a point in time prior to Taylor's departure and they all did a sort of role reversal from the first movie.

I'd have to go back and find my sources, but reportedly, the movie was supposed to feature Taylor as the lead. Heston felt the movie was a complete thing, and didn't want to return. He agreed finally to do a small part, and the script was rewritten for the new astronaut.

On another note, the budget shows. The ruins, famously, reuse sets from Hello Dolly and the crowd listening to Ursus was bolstered by extras in rubber masks.

Detective 445 said:

Beneath is interesting in that the star, James Franciscus, comes off as sort of a poor man's Charlton Heston. And the fact that Heston appears in the movie is a little off the wall too. I wonder how many sequels have featured the star of the first movie in only a cameo type role to support another actor who is copying him.

Amicus/AIP did something similar with Doug McClure in The People That Time Forgot, the sequel to The Land That Time Forgot. Spoiler warning. A friend of McClure's Bowen Tyler leads a rescue expedition to Caprona. The members of the expedition are captured by a people called the Nargas, and they discover Tyler is their prisoner. Tyler is killed during the escape. I didn't realise the similarity until now. It's my guess the screenwriter had Beneath in mind.

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