I always loved the minor heroes and villains like the Elongated Man, the Swordsman, Hourman, et al. Even characters who appeared only once or twice can be interesting. Certainly there can be untapped potential as well. These are some I always had a soft spot for:

  • The Weirdo Legionnaire-- from Adventure Comics #341. Yes, I know who he really is but I was disappointed that he wasn't an actual character, even though he was listed on the roll call. It would have been great to have a truly bizarre looking character like that on the team. I liked the idea of a masked three-headed, four tentacled stocky hero wanting to protect his secret identity. See my avatar!
  • The Prowler-- though he debuted in Amazing Spider-Man #78, I never heard of him until The Defenders #62-64 though his name wasn't mentioned until #64 and he didn't do much. Then in the "album" issue of Amazing Spider-Man #181, they showed examples of the heroes that Spidey worked with: The Fantastic Four, Daredevil and.......the Prowler (though he wasn't named there either!). I finally got the Marvel Tales that reprinted his first appearance. I liked his look and his place in Marvel history.
  • Tyros the Outcast from Atlantis-- from Brave & Bold #51, thanks to a mystic gem he was mutated into a giant winged frog-thing and battled Aquaman and Hawkman. He stole a magical horn that allowed him to command birds but his ability to command fish was his from the beginning. Aquaman even said only he and Tyros had that power. I think that they missed out on giving Aquaman a great rival. Tyros had more going for him than the Sea-Thief or Cutlass Charlie!
  • The Ant-- this apparently super-powered acrobat from Teen Titans #5 fought the Fab Four but he wasn't really a crook. I always wondered why the TT never asked him to join! Not only that, but he never appeared again (I think). Maybe it was his name...
  • DC's Libra--a little late maybe but his first appearance in Justice League of America #111 was seared in my memory. What a great issue--a 100 pager! But he left me with a lot of questions like how did he build a satellite? And his power stealing tech? I know that they tried to answer them when he reappeared in Final Crisis but I wasn't that impressed by it.

Those are some of my picks. What are yours?

 

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Chances are readers noticed the double Ls before the editor. And because the readers noticed it, the editor decided to captialize on it. It never bothered me that much--although there were some poor stories written around this theme. But those are the breaks. You can't expect every writer to knock it out of the park every time. Especially if their heart wasn't in it. Since the editor assigned the plots to the writers, they probably couldn't pick and choose--and it seems like different writers had their own strengths.

I liked the fact that Jimmy Olsen was Double 5. This was something I paid attention to with my own name, even before I found out that Jimmy was Agent Double 5. I considered myself Agent Triple 5. And 5 has always been a prevalent number in my life. It got weirder when I served in the navy and was introduced to the JP5 pump room on the flight deck of our ship.

I think the repetition in the Weisinger-edited stories was driven by two things:
1. The assumption that the readership changed every five years or less
2. The likelihood that nobody bought every issue.

Richard Willis said:

I think the repetition in the Weisinger-edited stories was driven by two things:
1. The assumption that the readership changed every five years or less
2. The likelihood that nobody bought every issue.

From my anecdotal experience as a kid, I'd say this was in fact what happened, nine times out of ten. 

I liked the fact that Jimmy Olsen was Double 5. 

Like you, I thought that was a clever idea. Five was always big for me, too, since I was born in May.

I would've preferred a grouping that gave me more than two syllables (Brian Kelly could've gotten me four for the same 10 letters!). I was mollified somewhat when Mark Waid came along. He was Agent Double-Four.

-- MSA

Here's another example. The twist conclusion of "Lois Lane Weds Astounding Man!" in Lois Lane #18 is arguably a variation on the cover image of Amazing Adventures [Ziff-Davis] #4. There's even a possible connection between the two: Jerry Siegel was the art director for Ziff-Davis's comics division. But there's a complicating issue. The GCD says Martin O'Hearn thinks Jerry Siegel wrote "Lois Lane Weds Astounding Man!", but that there's also a copy of the script autographed by Otto Binder.

I guess that makes me the Spirit of 76.

Mr. Silver Age said:

I liked the fact that Jimmy Olsen was Double 5. 

Like you, I thought that was a clever idea. Five was always big for me, too, since I was born in May.

I would've preferred a grouping that gave me more than two syllables (Brian Kelly could've gotten me four for the same 10 letters!). I was mollified somewhat when Mark Waid came along. He was Agent Double-Four.

-- MSA

...Real name-wise , I'm:

  Six-Five Special ! Born in Number One...

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