Back in April, while perusing the internet for the Dark Shadows Cookbook, I discovered (in a classic case of bad-timing) Danny Horn's "Dark Shadows Every Day Blog"... two weeks before it came to an end. But now he's got a new blog, and here's his introduction to it (complete with link)...

"Hey everyone! I talked in my final Dark Shadows post about a new project coming up, and here it is: Superheroes Every Day — the history of superhero movies, in order and in detail.

"The story starts with Superman: The Movie in 1978, and goes chronologically from there. The structure is very similar to this blog: talking about the movie from scene to scene, with lots of backstory and insight and crazy side trips. It’s about movies and comic books and money and singing cowboys and tax evasion and exploding scientists, and that’s just the beginning.

"Even if you’re not into superhero movies — if you love Dark Shadows Every Day, then you will love Superheroes Every Day. Come take a look, and if you like it, tell your friends! See you there."

Danny Horn is super-funny, and I am currently reading old posts to his Dark Shadows blog... well, every day. He said to "tell your friends" so I'm posting his notice here. I think many of you who post here will like it. 

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Odd choice, starting in '78., No Batman (1966), no 40's serials?

Nice! I'll check it out!

The Baron said:

Odd choice, starting in '78., No Batman (1966), no 40's serials?

He addresses his choice of starting point in his first post:

I want to start off strong, so for our purposes, the story begins in 1978 with Superman: The Movie. That means I’m not going to feature the earlier pre-blockbuster material: the 1940s serials featuring Batman, Superman and Captain America, the 1951 Superman and the Mole Men film/TV pilot, and the 1966 Batman film/TV spinoff. I’ll be covering all of them, one way or another — in the Superman: The Movie posts, I’m planning to touch on a lot of the pre-’78 Superman media — but I want to focus on the big, world-rattling films as the structure of this story.

Ah. That's what I get for not reading.

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

The Baron said:

Odd choice, starting in '78., No Batman (1966), no 40's serials?

He addresses his choice of starting point in his first post:

I want to start off strong, so for our purposes, the story begins in 1978 with Superman: The Movie. That means I’m not going to feature the earlier pre-blockbuster material: the 1940s serials featuring Batman, Superman and Captain America, the 1951 Superman and the Mole Men film/TV pilot, and the 1966 Batman film/TV spinoff. I’ll be covering all of them, one way or another — in the Superman: The Movie posts, I’m planning to touch on a lot of the pre-’78 Superman media — but I want to focus on the big, world-rattling films as the structure of this story.

I'm reading this blog daily now (I'm a few behind, but I'll catch up), and it's FASCINATING.

You know, I almost didn't read this blog at all because I have little interest in superhero movies. I started late but, being familiar with his Dark Shadows blog, I really should have had more faith . His blogs are about so much more than just the movies themselves; six posts in and he's still not through the opening credits sequence. Because I was so hopelessly far behind on the Dark Shadows ones I didn't read any of the comments, but I am on his superhero blogs. His followers are as knowledgeable as he his. I am impressed by his meticulous detail and in depth research. I'm off to read 1.7 now. when I get caught up, I may start to post there. 

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