Even though issues 1 and 2 didn't overly impress me, I was planning on sticking with Flash: Rebirth out of faith that Geoff Johns would ultimately give me a good story. But issue three today convinced me that...yeah, I'm just not digging this book.

At the same time, Wonder Woman and Runaways remain on the verge for me, dependent on a new storyline and a new creative team, respectively.

I guess, given that I have something like three or four titles I want to find a space for, this could be worse news, but I'm disappointed that I'm not enjoying all these titles more.

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Travis Herrick said:
Batmatt Beyond said:
Jeff of Earth-J said:
I don't see Captain America: Reborn as an "event"; I see the limited series released while the main title is on hiatus as a sales gimmick. It should be part of the regular series, but I don't blame Brubaker for that. I think the perception of this as a boring "event" is working against my perception that it's a good run of issues in an ongoing story arc.

Exactly. It was never supposed to be an event; it's really just Captain America #602 and following. I've been enjoying the insight into Steve Rogers as he quantum leaps, especially since I haven't read much of him before Brubaker's run.


Well it sure seemed like it was supposed to be an event. With the way it was solicited in Previews and the way Marvel was pushing it I don't see how you can say it wasn't suppose to be an event. Putting the regular series on hiatus makes it appear even more so.

Yes, but to hark back to what Jeff said, I would blame Marvel marketing for the perception of Reborn as an event. Brubaker was going to tell his story regardless of how Marvel published it. What I'm saying is that, as a longtime BruCap reader, I'm quite satisfied with the story.
Is anyone reading X-Men Forever? And can they convince me to keep reading it?

I fully confess that I've become so tired of Claremont's writing that I have hard time reading anything he does. But the Tom Grummett art has had me keeping the title this long. But, geez, it's so ... Claremont-y!


Cap, I recently borrowed the first trade from the library. I slogged my way through the first issue but was in full skim mode by the middle of the second. I didn't even bother finishing it and it's going back to the library mostly unread.

I've defended Claremont before (and more than most on this board) but I found X-Men Forever to be unreadable.

The biggest problem for me was that it failed to answer any question of "Why." Why did Fabian Cortez attack the X-Men? I don't know, just because, I guess. Why is Nick Fury hanging out at the X-mansion? I don't know, just because, I guess. There was no motivation, no reason to do anything. It felt like I was watching a kid play with his toys. I certainly wasn't reading a story that had any purpose to it.

I'm very glad that I didn't waste any money on it.
I just finished reading Captain America Reborn #5 and I stand by what I said above.

The funny thing about X-Men Forever for me (i.e., funny-odd not funny-haha) is I was able to not read X-Men for 18 years (Morrison's run excepted), and was able to pick up right smack-dab almost exactly where I left off. YMMV...
I had been planning to add the Robinson/Bagley JLA to my list -- and had, for the last three issues. But the more I've heard about it, the more I realize it'll be tied up in too many events that I'd rather not get pulled into. Plus, the most recent issue (featuring "Dr. Light: The Supervillain Whose Power is Rape!" tm) really struck me as sad and distasteful. So I think I'm gonna let it pass.

On the other hand, it'll free up a slot for something else... ideally, something crossover-free. I think I might pick up Power Girl, as the Vartox issue looked like a lot of fun when I flipped through it yesterday. I'd initially been worried about crossover with JSA, but the tone seems so different, I think that's fairly unlikely.
Chris Fluit said:
Cap, I recently borrowed the first trade from the library. I slogged my way through the first issue but was in full skim mode by the middle of the second.

If I might ask, out of curiosity: did the trade explain how it relates to the standard titles' continuity?
Luke Blanchard said:
Chris Fluit said:
Cap, I recently borrowed the first trade from the library. I slogged my way through the first issue but was in full skim mode by the middle of the second.

If I might ask, out of curiosity: did the trade explain how it relates to the standard titles' continuity?

From the inrterviews I've read, it is like Terry Pratchett's 'wrong trouser-leg of time' idea.

Rewind the X-men continuity to just when Claremont stopped writing (adjectiveless X-men #3 or so in 1991), and now watch as Claremeont takes it forward from there in a completely different direction.

Age of Apocalypse, Morrison's run, House of M - non of it happened.

It's good in theory. We now have an X-men continuity where things happen that won't be re-conned by another writer. Where the writer can plot things out like a long novel without caring about big events and crossovers derailing the structure, or other writers insisting certain characters can't be used, or can't be used like that, or that the character is in outer space right now, or has been de-powered.

Claremont has already celebrated that freedom by a narrative stroke that simply would never happen in normal X-men continuity because it would hit the corporate bottom line.

Great in theory, just don't ask me to read the thing!

Interestingly, whether its a new direction from Marvel or a more creator-driven thing from writers that have been knocked around by editorial fiat too long, it may be the start of a trend.

Louise Simonson is starting a similar project, taking up where she left off with X-factor in X-Factor Forever.

Jeff said: The funny thing about X-Men Forever for me (i.e., funny-odd not funny-haha) is I was able to not read X-Men for 18 years (Morrison's run excepted), and was able to pick up right smack-dab almost exactly where I left off. YMMV...

I wonder are these projects a way to 'mop up' readers just like you, who have an allegiance to certain periods of X-men continuity, but have long been put off by the continuous recycling of ideas, 'bold new directions' and inevitable resets?

If so, it's not funny-odd, but well-targeted marketing.

In any case, it's Hypertime by the back door...
"Louise Simonson is starting a similar project, taking up where she left off with X-factor in X-Factor Forever."

*SHUDDER*

This issues where hubby Walt Simonson was penciling and rather obviously co-plotting were really good. As soon as he left, the book's quality took a nose-dive. A steep nose-dive. Into a mountain. An exploding mountain.
Thanks, Fig, but you've misunderstood me. Chris said he got the volume out the library, and that made me wonder if the volume explains the premise.
Luke Blanchard said:
Thanks, Fig, but you've misunderstood me. Chris said he got the volume out the library, and that made me wonder if the volume explains the premise.

Ah! A good question in that case...

They might have just decided that the X-men continuity is already so dense and tangled that explaining this new branch wouldn't be worth the bother.

If you pick any X-men book off the shelf, you're starting in the middle of something, and just have to get with the programme.

Then again Claremont 'finishing what he started' might be a selling point.

Chris?
Figs pretty much explained it. The premise of the title is that it's picking up where Claremont left off when he left the X-Men in 1991. So it's completely unrelated to current continuity or anything that happened since 1991. But I found that it's not really related to where Claremont left off in 1991 either as he brought Kitty and Nightcrawler back to the team (they were in Excalibur at the time) without explaining it except for an offhand comment.

But, no, the trade doesn't include any editorials or extras that would provide additional explanation.
Figserello said:
Jeff said: The funny thing about X-Men Forever for me (i.e., funny-odd not funny-haha) is I was able to not read X-Men for 18 years (Morrison's run excepted), and was able to pick up right smack-dab almost exactly where I left off. YMMV...

I wonder are these projects a way to 'mop up' readers just like you, who have an allegiance to certain periods of X-men continuity, but have long been put off by the continuous recycling of ideas, 'bold new directions' and inevitable resets?

The real funny thing is that I'm not particularly a fan of that era, but the "real" x-titles left me behind years ago. I do miss the characters, though, and X-Men Forever is a comforable fit for me.
What Jeff said.

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