OK, just read issue #0.  It involves the current iteration of Nova, who is apparently a kid named Sam Alexander, whose father was an old drunk who claimed to have been an intergalactic space hero, and who eventually disappeared. In time, the son discovers that the old man had been an intergalactic space hero and ends up becoming the new Nova himself. I'm not familiar with this version of the character, so I can't say how long he's been around. I remember reading the original Nova nearly forty years ago - I don't have any great memories of him except that he was drawn by Carmine Infantino for awhile.

 

Anyway, our Sam fights a robot version of Tomazooma and meets the Avengers and asks them about the Watcher and finds out that while they know the Watcher watches, they don't know why. So, he goes to the Moon and gives the Watcher a rock and Utau Atua Utapau Uatu shows him his home movies of how his Dad (Uatu's, I mean, not Sam's) was the one who had the bright idea of giving the Prosilicans nuclear energy and we all know how that worked out.  Is this new?  I don't remember it being U Thant Utrecht Uatu's old man who did that. Anyway, Sam asks Uatu just how much he watches and Uatu blows his mind by showing him scenes from old issues of What If.  Anyway, Sam realizes that what Uatu is really hoping to see is a world where his dad wasn't wrong. Sam commiserates and says that he wishes his father wasn't a screw-up, too, then asks Uatu what happened to his (Sam's, not Uatu's) dad, and after a slight pause, Uatu tells Sam that his dad is still alive. (Say, isn't that sort of "interfering", Uatu, old son?).  Sam goes off happy and Uatu puts the rock on a shelf. 

 

A mildly interesting story, and the art is nice enough.

 

Say, the Watcher apparently has an armory - he's really loaded for bear - where he keeps the Ultimate Nullifier. How'd he end up with it? I thought Galactus took that back after Reed made him promise to leave Earth after threatening to blow his head off with it.

 

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Original Sin #5 of 8 (September 2014): "The Secret History of Colonel Nicholas J. Fury"

Nick flashes back to Kansas in 1958, where he's fighting aliens. Thigns aren't goign well when a guy in space hero armor show up to save the day, but is fatally wounded in the process. He warns Nick about the Skrulls, then expired. Howard Stark races up and says that aliens can't grow mustaches. Howard explains tha tht edead guy was Woodrow McCord, a sort of super-secret alien fighter, and recruits Fury to be his replacement. We see Fury stopping a bunch of horse-faced guys from invading Earth. So Fury fights aliens, and elder gods and other monsters, and are told that "being director of SHIELD" is merely his cover job.  We see Nick subsequently torturing a Skrull, and deciding not to assassinate Spider-Man. Fury claims to have "...burned worlds. Destabilized galaxies. Dethroned gods", all unseen by anyone (except of course, the Watcher.)  Scott, Stephen, Emma, Frank, Bucky, Gamora, T'Challa, Marc and Rocket all take this in, with varying levels of disbelief. Orb says that Fury still isn't telling everything, but colapses in pain before he can say anything else. T'Challa asks Nick what happened to Uatu. Quoth Nick: "He died. And now...now I suppose it's my turn."

 

So, more secret history, everything you know is wrong, ibbity-pibbity, lippy-tappy too-tah.  Meh.

So Nick Fury wasn't just picked out of a desk job at the Pentagon to run SHIELD?  Why would he even want to kill Spiderman anyway?

If I'm reading it right, his job as director of SHIELD is entirely separate from his job as a Secret Alien Fighter.  The two have nothing to do with one another.

 

I don't know much about Fury's continuity, but if you were to tell me that this makes gibberish out of it, I would not perish from astonishment.

 

Why would he want to assassinate Spider-Man? I suspect because he's a Government Agent in Modern Day Comic Book Land, and therefore is always on the verge of assassinating anyone at any time.  Government Agents in Modern Day Comic Book Land consider assassinating the milkman if he delivers heavy cream instead of half-and-half.

One other thing, if Fury could all of that why did he have trouble with HYDRA? 

As I say, if you told me this made nonsense of Fury's continuity, I wouldn't be surprised.

Because Baron Strucker and Madame Hydra didn't have the clearance to know he could beat them easily?

1958. This is just before Hal Jordan first appeared. 

So Nick met Abin Sur and became a Green Lantern...

Yes, and Spider-Man is actually the avatar of an ancient spider god. And the Thing just wants Reed to think he can't turn back into Ben Grimm any time he wants to because he thinks he stole Sue from him and wants him to feel guilty. And Bruce Banner pretends he can't control the Hulk so he can get away with being a jerk whenever he wants to then claim he can't help himself. And Odin wouldn't let Thor marry Jane Foster because he wanted her (which actually happened in a What If story.)


 
Mark S. Ogilvie said:

One other thing, if Fury could all of that why did he have trouble with HYDRA? 

Original Sin #6 of 8 (September 2014): "Open Your Eye"

Doctor Midas and Exterminatrix ride a fishing boat somewhere. She complains that they're evolving or something. She says that it's the worst murder they've ever been a part of. He turns the fishing captain into gold. They recover a space ship and head back to the Moon.

 

Meanwhile, in space, Nick confronts T'Challa, Emma, Scott Lang, Stephen, Frank, Bucky, Gamora, Marc and Rocket. The LMDs haul away the Orb, who isn't feeling well.

 

Also, Nick apparently has pet names for his LMDs.

 

T'Challa asks Nick what one of his bullets was doing in Uatu's skull. Nick says he and Uatu have always had a "complicated" relationship. (What? Since when have they even had a "relationship"?)

 

We flash back a couple of weeks ago to see a badly-wounded Nick refusing to die with Uatu watching him.

 

In the present, Nick reveals that the Plot Convenience Formula has worn off, and that his expiration date is approaching quickly. He wants one of the Odd Squad that he's gathered to take his place.

 

Meanwhile, in Avengers Tower, Tony, Steve, Natasha and Logan have worked out that Dead Fury is an LMD. It blows up real good, but not before Tony tracks a signal from it.

 

Back in space, the Odd Squad all think Nick is nuts. T'Challa point blank asks Nick who killed Uatu. Nick zaps Bucky, grabs the eye, and uses the LMDs to cover his escape.

 

Nick punches the Orb, trying to get him to explain why Uatu's eye would open for him, but the other eye wouldn't open for Nick.  The Orb complains that he is changing. Also he says that the eye liked him, which is why it opened for him.

 

Meanwhile, Steve, Luke, Bruce, Natasha, Logan, Thor, Sam, Peter, Carol and Logan arrive. Steve demands answers. Fury appears, heavily armored and carrying both of Uatu's eyes, which are apparently open.   It would seem that  it is showtime.

 

 

Overall: Um, what? Wasn't this the issue where we were supposed to find out who killed the Watcher? Then how come that is one thing in particular that wasn't clear once I finished reading this book? Look, I'm thick, somebody else read this book and tell me what I'm missing.

I guess this mystery is still playing out.

This story sounds more and more like an excuse to get rid of Nick Fury and make us want him to be gone. Did he kill the Watcher?

And when did he get the name Uatu anyway? In his origin his father's name and the one guy that was opposed to them doing anything but watching's name, but the storyteller was never named.

If all the above (or even half of them) accurately describe what's going on in the mainline Marvel Universe, I'd just as soon pretend that the M.U. imploded circa 1986 when I mostly stopped keeping up with it.  That just isn't the Nick Fury created by Lee & Kirby 52 years ago or even the Nick Fury of Steranko.  And overall, it's becoming an ever more convoluted mess.  The modern movies based on the M.U., however loosely, are still pretty fun (most of them anyhow; the last Ghost Rider film was horrid in all the wrong ways), and judging from reviews I've read there are still some creators producing excellent comics for Marvel, but these company-wide events that "change everything" seem more and more damaging to the core of Marvel.  But then, I'm an ancient now, long past my Marvel-devoted youth; maybe this stuff appeals to the current audience that may prefer everything more hardcore.

Ron M. said:

And when did he get the name Uatu anyway? In his origin his father's name and the one guy that was opposed to them doing anything but watching's name, but the storyteller was never named.

I looked up Uatu on Wikipedia. They say that he was finally given the name Uatu in Captain Marvel #39 (JUL75). GCD doesn't note that this is the first time he is named, but he was one of five Watchers in the story. He and the others were referred to by name. The story was "The Trial of the Watcher," by Steve Englehart.

I read #38, which started the trial, but never saw #39. Next I knew the Watcher was trying to warn Ben Grimm about that vibranium that got sent back to WWII in Marvel Two In One without saying anything by slightly changing his expression as the Thing asked him questions.

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