I've saved the original thread, and I'll transfer the posts across as time permits.

Painting of the Day (original series):

Winter by Nicolas Poussin, a French painter of the 17th century who worked for most of his career in Rome.

This is one of his series The Four Seasons, painted near the end of his life. Each depicts a Biblical scene. In this case the subject is Noah's flood. You can see the Ark in the background on the left.

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Luke Blanchard said:
Painting of the Day: The Ghauts at Benares, by William Hodges. 1787.

Cool. At first I thought this was just a striking picture of waterside architecture, but then I realised this is an important location in at least three eras of The Invisibles series. They call it Varanasi there, rather than Benares. I'm going to link to this from that thread.
My encyclopedia tells me that it's indeed the same city. It's one of the oldest cities in the world, and an important religious centre for Hindus. The ghauts are the steps leading down to the water.

Painting of the Day: Dodo and Red Parakeet, by William Hodges. c.1773.
Thanks again, Baron. The style of that one reminds me of some contemporary paintings I've seen.

Painting of the Day: The Royal Academicians in General Assembly, by Henry Singleton. 1795.

Among the sculptures - presumably copies - I recognise the Laocoön, the Apollo Belvedere, the Belvedere Torso and the Medici Venus.
Painting of the Day: The Royal Academy Selection and Hanging Committee 1938, by Frederick William Elwell. 1938.
Luke Blanchard said:
Painting of the Day: The Royal Academy Selection and Hanging Committee 1938, by Frederick William Elwell. 1938.

I wonder who they ended up hanging.
A quick one while Luke isn't watching ;) - It's the Feast of the Presentation of Jesus at the Temple, so here's a picture of same by Hans Holbein the Elder.
The way he's handled Joseph's feet is interesting. I think I'd heard that Hans Holbein the Younger was the elder Holbein's son, but I didn't know he had a second artist son, Ambrosius.

Painting of the Day: The Shipwreck, by Joseph Vernet. 1759.
Luke Blanchard said:
The way he's handled Joseph's feet is interesting.

If he didn't want to draw proper feet, he should have just cropped them out of the frame the way Rob Liefield always does.

Luke Blanchard said:

Painting of the Day: The Shipwreck, by Joseph Vernet. 1759.

Oops, that's your brutalist church from hell again...
Donnerwetter. Try here. Thanks for the catch, Fig.
Today is the feast day of St. Joseph of Leonessa, so here's a picture of Saint Fidelis of Sigmaringen and Saint Joseph of Leonessa, by Giova....

I'm not sure what's going on here. Fidelis appears to be teaching a cherub how to roll a drunk, while Joseph is praying fervently that they don't get caught. Of course, I could be misinterpreting things. Nice painting, though.
The Baron said:
Today is the feast day of St. Joseph of Leonessa, so here's a picture of Saint Fidelis of Sigmaringen and Saint Joseph of Leonessa, by Giova....

I'm not sure what's going on here. Fidelis appears to be teaching a cherub how to roll a drunk, while Joseph is praying fervently that they don't get caught. Of course, I could be misinterpreting things. Nice painting, though.

Or he's lecturing the drunk about the evils of alcohol, while Joseph prays for all of their souls. But I like yours better.

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