Every week, one item or another in my pull and hold stands out for me above the rest in one way or another. Sometimes it’s a periodical, sometimes a graphic novel, sometimes a collection. Does that happen to you? If so, let’s hear about it here. It can be an item you’ve long anticipated or something you bought on a whim. If it’s something you were really looking forward to but ended up being a big disappointment, let’s hear about that here, too. I’ve been meaning to start this topic for a long time now, but chose today to post about something I’ve been waiting for a long time, long before it was even solicited.

SILVER SURFER EPIC COLLECTION BY STEVE ENGLEHART AND MARSHAL ROGERS

This is a favorite run of mine, but I’ve read it only twice: once as it was released, and I re-read it once after that. It came out as an “ESSENTIAL” a few years ago, but for this I held out for color.

EDIT: Most weeks I make my picks before I have read them, but feel free to choose either the books you anticipate most before you read or enjoy the most after you have read them.

Views: 6369

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I'll have to go with Mockingbird #4 myself.

Hillbilly #1 by Eric Powell.

A great first issue. I recommend to anyone who likes The Goon.

Mine has to be Captain America #2. Even without having read the first one, it was my main reason for going to the store. It didn't disappoint -- though Marvel's reprint program did, as the 2nd printing of issue 1 still hasn't arrived. I had to go digital to finally start reading.

I'm going to go with Jupiter's Legacy Vol. 2 #1. I still haven't read it, but I'm looking forward to it greatly.

July 6! I promise!

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

Mine has to be Captain America #2. Even without having read the first one, it was my main reason for going to the store. It didn't disappoint -- though Marvel's reprint program did, as the 2nd printing of issue 1 still hasn't arrived. I had to go digital to finally start reading.

There is so much good stuff coming out this week that I couldn't possibly narrow it down to a single choice. There are no less than five contenders on my list, not including four first issues. Maybe I'll be able to pick a favorite from among those nine after I have read them.

I was on vacation, and only able to get my comics yesterday. Now that I've read a bunch of them, the one I think deserves the most attention is...

The Flintstones. 

Yeah, I'm shocked, too.

It's a weird book. Instead of taking the original show's tone and updating it, it strips even that away. The original Flintstones TV show, as Cap mentions in his review, was basically The Honeymooners in prehistoric drag. But we don't watch The Honeymooners anymore -- the Flintstones surpassed that in our cultural consciousness decades ago. So the question is, if you strip The Honeymooners out of The Flintstones, is it still The Flintstones? And what do you put in its place?

It looks to me like Russell and Pugh have substituted Mad Men -- not the characters so much as the tone. And why not? It's an acclaimed show commenting on the exact time the Flintstones was produced. We've got our central couple, dissatisfied with their lives, but not sure how to break free. We've got haves and have-nots, users and used. We've got hopes dashed, and plans gone awry. We've got the touching story behind WIlma's art. And we've got Mr. Slate, the world's slimiest boss. And it's got fun prehistoric puns (the club "Whammoth Bammoth Thank You Mammoth") along with subtler gags (watch that poor Neanderthal and his balloon).

Cap didn't go for this one, but I think it's great. It's a reimagining on the level of Afterlife with Archie, but this kind of social dramedy will never be the crowd-pleaser that zombies are. It might not click with you. But it's definitely worth your time, to see if it does. 

I saw some pages from The Flintstones, and while I can see what Russell is trying to do and I don't think it's a bad idea, I do think that calling it "Flintstones" doesn't work. Plus, I can just imagine some parent picking this up for their 5-7 year old and then finding out that it is not age-appropriate.

Yeah, retailers shouldn't rack this one with the kids' books, and know what they're selling when a parent picks it up. Though I doubt too many kids are very aware of who the Flintstones are, these days.

I don't have or really know anyone who has kids, but it wouldn't surprise me if the Flintstones are still part of the consciousness of children--or more to the point, in the consciousness of their parents.  I think there's still a lot of Fred and Barney on kids TV commercials if nothing else.

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

 Though I doubt too many kids are very aware of who the Flintstones are, these days.

Yeah, I guess they're cereal peddlers if nothing else.

I agree with your review, Rob. It's still not for me, but I hope those who will enjoy it see enough in what you said and what I said that they'll find it. It's very well done.

It may help you to know I wasn't a regular Mad Men viewer, either. I lived through that era -- in the South, the 1950s continued until around 1968 -- and didn't care to revisit it. (I feel the same way about stories set in high school, BTW. I didn't hate high school, but I see no reason to revisit it in my 50s.) So that may inform why I was left cold by The Flintstones. It was just depressing.

But someone else's mileage may vary, like yours did!

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service