Every week, one item or another in my pull and hold stands out for me above the rest in one way or another. Sometimes it’s a periodical, sometimes a graphic novel, sometimes a collection. Does that happen to you? If so, let’s hear about it here. It can be an item you’ve long anticipated or something you bought on a whim. If it’s something you were really looking forward to but ended up being a big disappointment, let’s hear about that here, too. I’ve been meaning to start this topic for a long time now, but chose today to post about something I’ve been waiting for a long time, long before it was even solicited.

SILVER SURFER EPIC COLLECTION BY STEVE ENGLEHART AND MARSHAL ROGERS

This is a favorite run of mine, but I’ve read it only twice: once as it was released, and I re-read it once after that. It came out as an “ESSENTIAL” a few years ago, but for this I held out for color.

EDIT: Most weeks I make my picks before I have read them, but feel free to choose either the books you anticipate most before you read or enjoy the most after you have read them.

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I wasn't able to pick up Flash Annual #1 -- my store sold out, and my retailer didn't realize I wanted the annuals as well as the regular issues on my pull list -- so that'll have to wait. But nothing is going to top a sequel to "The Nearness of You" on my most-anticipated list. Not even the return of the elder Wally West to the fore. 

(And I still haven't read Milk Wars, either -- though a brief glance at Mart Gray's review on his Too Dangerous For a Girl blog suggests I'll really like it.)

I read Flash Annual #1 last night, and I have a question. Was Magenta a Titan? Or is that a post-Rebirth conceit? 

I started the JLA/Doom Patrol book, but fell asleep halfway through. Probably the condition more than the material, as I am old. But I did make a mental note that maybe I should catch up on Doom Patrol before I try again, because I don't know all the characters and the writer didn't bother to inform me who they are and what they can do.

Also -- and maybe this is explained later -- the "milk" people were all variants of Justice League of America characters: Batman, Black Canary, Killer Frost, Lobo, Atom, The Ray and Vixen. So what was Superman doing there? Wrong team!

I posted my thoughts on the JLA/Doom Patrol book over in "What Comic Books Have You Read Today?"

Looks like it might have been the story that was the soporific, and not my condition!

Cap, I am reading Doom Patrol, and I'm not 100& sure of all the characters and their abilities either. Obviously Cliff is still Robotman, Larry is Negative Man etc.but while I'm familiar with Crazy Jane, Danny the Street Ambulance and Flex Mentallo, I'm not really aware of what Casey's powers are despite her being a large part of the focus of the title so far. Unfortunately, it's written in such a way that the concepts seem more important than the characters, and that's pretty much a turn off for me, as I would like some explanations so I better understand things (I think I'm reading the title more because it's Doom Patrol than because I think it's actually good). I would have to agree with Jeff that much of it is "weirdness for weirdness' sake", more like the latter part of Morrison's run than the former.

As far as "Superman's" appearance, I don't want to spoil that one for you.

Captain Comics said:

I started the JLA/Doom Patrol book, but fell asleep halfway through. Probably the condition more than the material, as I am old. But I did make a mental note that maybe I should catch up on Doom Patrol before I try again, because I don't know all the characters and the writer didn't bother to inform me who they are and what they can do.

Also -- and maybe this is explained later -- the "milk" people were all variants of Justice League of America characters: Batman, Black Canary, Killer Frost, Lobo, Atom, The Ray and Vixen. So what was Superman doing there? Wrong team!

Thanks, Randy!

Randy Jackson said:

I would have to agree with Jeff that much of it is "weirdness for weirdness' sake", more like the latter part of Morrison's run than the former.

Our late friend Robin Olsen turned me on to the Paul Kupperberg Doom Patrol (Showcase 94-96, DP 1-19), just before Morrison's run. It's really good and not look-how-weird-we-are, which is the impression I have of the Morrison Doom Patrol. I probably will never read the Morrison run.

The first few arcs of the Morrison run are quite good. They are weird, but the storytelling is solid and you can pretty much tell what's going on in each story. However, IMO, it's the latter arcs that begin going off the rails in terms of storytelling and coherence.

Rachel Pollak's run takes a lot of heat (mainly for not being Morrison IMO), but at the very least it's coherent.

Morrison's Doom Patrol was probably my favorite comic at the time it was being published. I guess you could say it was weirdness for weirdness' sake, but I think that was kind of the point of the original Doom Patrol stories as well. And I think a lot of what Morrison was doing was pushing the boundaries of what could be done with superhero comics. So I guess that could be interpreted as just trying to be weird. But at the same time, he basically redefined what could be done with superheroes. And that approach eventually migrated into the mainstream when he took over writing chores on X-Men.

The Drake/Premiani Doom Patrol stories were weird, but they were also coherent and fairly easy to follow. Many of Morrison's early Doom Patrol stories followed the same pattern--for instance, the first Brotherhood of Dada story was quite odd, but it was also pretty easy to understand.

However, the latter stories, such as the second Brotherhood of Dada story were much less coherent and seemed to me to be a rambling mess of weird concepts and ideas that really didn't lead anywhere. There were stories that had a beginning, middle and end, but you would get to the end and wonder just what happened in the story you just read. My contention is that somewhere along the way, Morrison stopped telling stories in favor of just throwing whatever weirdness he could think of at the reader and pretend he was being deep.

Of course, I also consider Morrison to be one of the most overrated comics creators ever, so I may be just a tad biased.

I've been reading the new Doom Patrol, and have been enjoying it, even though it's largely someone trying to be Morrison, and not quite managing it. I'm not sure why I'm enjoying it, but I am.

I never did finish all of Morrison's Doom Patrol, but I like his Animal Man very much. To me, it is evocative of Silver Age Green Lantern or Flash, which is to say it's quite different from those titles, but the storytelling sensibilities are quite similar. It's almost as if it answers the question "What if DC comics continued to tell Silver Age type stories through the present day?" Maybe it's the same was with his Doom Patrol... I'm not familiar enough with either his or the original to make the comparison. I do like his X-Men very much.

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