As a bit of a departure, I'll be covering a character I doubt many of you have heard of. He called himself the Bat-Man and three were a few comics about him back iin period of the late 1930's-early 1940's. I wonder whatever happened to him, as I though he perhaps had some staying power in the right hands.

I'll be covering Detective Comics #27, #29-38 and Batman #1. These stories seem to be the primary genesis of the character and some of his exterior trappings.

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Again, off the top of my head, the DC sidekicks were living with, for the most part, wealthy, prominent men who were part of their cities' social scene. It's not like they were hidden from view. So there had to be some legal status for these single men raising orphaned teenage boys.

Book length stories were either rare or non-existent, so it was hard to squeeze in such background information. Plus, no one was asking.

Well, it came up in Batman #20!

I think DC did a better job of defining these relationships than the bulk of their competitors did.  Wasn't Rip Carter even identified as the legal guardian of the Boy Commandos?  That's more than Bucky ever got until the Revisionist Historians went to work.

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