Regarding “Outlawed”: I think that if I lived in a “super-hero” universe, I would be doubtful about  having kids fighting crime, especially in unsupervised situations.

I never really thought about it until Courtney Whitmore joined the JSA, when it occurred to me that “If she gets hurt or killed while she’s with them, it would be the end of the team. Even setting aside the concern they should be feeling for her welfare, concern for their own legal liability should’ve made them think twice before letting her on the team.”


Also, wasn’t there a kid who got kicked off the Avengers because he was underage? Night Thrasher, or something? I wonder how he felt when they let Kamala Khan, Miles Morales and Sam Alexander on the team. The truth comes out: “We didn’t kick you out because you were underage, we kicked you out because you were lamer than Tiny Tim Cratchitt.”


Should there be training facilities for super-powered kids? Sure. Lots of dramatic potential, there. Should kids be allowed unsupervised anywhere near actual crimefighting? No way.

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The same issue would arise for every adult hero with a kid sidekick.  It's something that the comics reader should probably try not to think too hard about.

One of the few times that is was addressed even slightly was back in the mid 1960's, with Beast Boy's membership of the Doom Patrol and the Teen Titans.  Neither of these groups would let Gar join them, as he was unable to get permission from his guardian.

This must have been particularly galling for him when he tried to join the Teen Titans.  Amusingly, the four charter members had apparently formed the group after getting permission from Aquaman, Batman, Wonder Woman and Flash.  I don't know Aquaman's relationship to Aqualad, but this means that Robin had permission from his guardian, Wonder Girl from her big sister, while Kid Flash had to make do with permission from his aunt's boyfriend!

I think of kid superheroes and kid sidekicks as one of those quaint relics of the past that absolutely cannot fly in modern comics. To my mind, introducing training facilities doesn't fix the problem; it just takes the fun out of it.

Kid sidekicks worked back in the day when a housewife could make a superhero costume out of red longjohns, a yellow sweatshirt and yellow sweat socks, and wear a cooking pot as a helmet, and go beat up the neighborhood toughs. But not any more.

I'll disagree with you there ,if only because of My Hero Academia, which is set  in a high school for potential super-heroes, and which I find to be a fun read.



ClarkKent_DC said:

I think of kid superheroes and kid sidekicks as one of those quaint relics of the past that absolutely cannot fly in modern comics. To my mind, introducing training facilities doesn't fix the problem; it just takes the fun out of it.

As much as I enjoy(ed) the LSH over the years, it is amazing that the United Planets essentially give a bunch of teenagers free rein.  This is especially weird since we seem to be constraining what teenagers can do more and more.  When I was in high school (early to mid 70s) we had a smoking lounge for students.  Now if I understand it (I don’t smoke, so I have no reason to pay attention) you have to beat least 21 to buy tobacco.

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