http://kalinara.blogspot.com/

Lots to read here...and well thought-out.

Views: 128

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Here's a direct link to the post, since it won't stay at the top forever.

And I agree -- she makes some really interesting observations.
I think it's been a fairly standard observation for years that Claremont writes gender-reversed characters. At least, I've commented (complained?) about it for most of my adult life. Claremont writes passive men and aggressive women to the point where gender stereotypes are quite obviously reversed-- it's usually his women who enjoy physical fights and wade in at the slightest provocation, and the men who hang back, wring their hands, shout warnings and generally act like 1960s Sue Storm. Including talking and/or thinking about their feelings a lot.

So nothing new here for me, except zooming in on a specific gender-reversed relationship in a book full of them. But nicely written.
I agree with you about Claremont...but I think it is clear from this initial post that the author intends to continue looking at the relationship as it has developed past the Claremont run. (as hinted by the comments on Emma, Jean and Scott).

Captain Comics said:
I think it's been a fairly standard observation for years that Claremont writes gender-reversed characters. At least, I've commented (complained?) about it for most of my adult life. Claremont writes passive men and aggressive women to the point where gender stereotypes are quite obviously reversed-- it's usually his women who enjoy physical fights and wade in at the slightest provocation, and the men who hang back, wring their hands, shout warnings and generally act like 1960s Sue Storm. Including talking and/or thinking about their feelings a lot.

So nothing new here for me, except zooming in on a specific gender-reversed relationship in a book full of them. But nicely written.
Thanks Doc.

I really love speculative/interpretive stuff like this. Fun to see it applied to a series like this that is usually only taken at it's surface level.

...Great inking by Terry Austin there...
And, for all his faults, Claremont at least pushed things away from the very old fashioned "protect" Sue and Jean days. He allowed for new characterizations which Morrison, Fraction, and others could run with...making all of them more human and real. Given the comics they read as kids, Lucas and Spielberg are the children of Lee and Kirby, but Whedon and Davies are the boys of Claremont...and their pop culture creations show it.
Kalinara gives another example here.
Rob Staeger said:
Kalinara gives another example here.

Hmmm...I don't recall Scott wanting to clean that badly since Emma. She should bring that up with Jean when she returns from the dead...again...
Jean's not currently dead. She's in "the white hot room" or something. It's hard to explain, even afrer having been told verbally and reading the wiki.

"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." -Groucho Marx

Check out the Secret Headquarters (my store) website! It's a pretty lame website, but I did it myself, so tough noogies

Listen to WOXY.com, it's the future of rock-n-roll!


To my mind, she's dead...and I wouldn't mind her staying that way.
I say she died in X-Men 137.
PowerBook Pete said:
I say she died in X-Men 137.
Denial is not just a river in Egypt.
And X-Men ended when Byrne left the title, dagnabbit!

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2019   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service