Just bringing this discussion over to ning...

What books are you reading right now that don't have a narrative driven by images as well as words?

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I'm so glad you liked them!

The most recent books I've been reading -- Sara Gran's Claire DeWitt mysteries -- remind me a lot of the John Blake books...if mixed with a little Dirk Gently. DeWitt takes the "holistic detective" bit -- there are no coincidences, only clues -- and plays it for noir instead of laughs. And reading these books, you can see how torn apart she's become from her experiences of being a detective. I loved the first -- Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead -- and I like the second, Claire DeWitt and the Bohemian Highway, a lot. The first is set mostly in New Orleans, the second one mostly in San Francisco. The third, Infinite Blacktop, is set in Las Vegas, but I haven't gotten there yet. 

And I loved Angelmaker -- I'll have to give Tigerman a look!

Mark Sullivan (Vertiginous Mod) said:

Finally got around to reading both John Blake crime noirs: Little Girl Lost and Songs Of Innocence. I remember Rob Staeger recommending them. Wow, both of them were riveting. Full of twists and turns, and absolutely brutal endings. 

I just started Nick Harkaway's Tigerman, and am enjoying it. I loved his Angelmaker, so I bought this and Gnomon when the Kindle editions went on sale.

I recently finished reading Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown. This is a true story about the 1936 Berlin Olympics US Men's 8 Man Rowing team (that is quite a mouthful). It is awesome! I loved this book. Reading about these young, mostly poor kids from Washington going up the likes of Cal, Harvard, and Yale in college races all the way up to the Olympics. I was really getting excited and on the edge of my seat reading about rowing. ROWING!

Of course this deal with Hitler and Germany getting prepared for the Olympics and how they white washed what they were doing before they game started,

A decent amount, but not too many of photos sprinkled throughout the book.

Recently Re-Read:

Ring, by Koji Suzuki
Spiral, by Koji Suzuki
Loop, by Koji Suzuki
Birthday, by Koji Suzuki
Some Prefer Nettles, by Junichiro Tanizaki

Currently Re-Reading:

Seven Japanese Tales, by Junichiro Tanizaki

Currently Re-Reading:

The Reed Cutter and Captain Shigemoto's Mother, by Junichiro Tanizaki

I'm currently reading Adventures on the High Teas: In Search of Middle England by Stuart Maconie. Stuart is a well-known broadcaster and DJ in the UK, and in the book, published in 2009, he sets out to track down and identify the English middle class, their thoughts, characteristics and motivation.  Maconie himself was brought up in in solidly working class town in northern England, so his journey is that of a man seeking to identify something that he isn't. His method is to basically visit and stay at a number of very middle-class towns in England (Buxton, Surbiton, Knutsford, Leamington Spa and others) and contrast them and their residents with his own working class upbringing in a northern town. The result makes for some illuminating reading.  Is there still a class system in England? You betcha...

Currently Re-Reading:

The Makioka Sisters, by Junichiro Tanizaki

The Baron said:

Currently Re-Reading:

The Reed Cutter and Captain Shigemoto's Mother, by Junichiro Tanizaki

I just realized that the title is "High Teas," not "High Seas." Very clever.

Steve W said:

I'm currently reading Adventures on the High Teas: In Search of Middle England by Stuart Maconie. 

Currently Re-Reading The Key and Diary of a Mad Old Man, by Junichiro Tanizaki



The Baron said:

Currently Re-Reading:

The Makioka Sisters, by Junichiro Tanizaki

The Baron said:

Currently Re-Reading:

The Reed Cutter and Captain Shigemoto's Mother, by Junichiro Tanizaki

I'm finally reading Ira Levin's Rosemary's Baby (saw the film, never read the book) and a recent MG graphic novel (but that's another thread) called Beetle and the Hollowbones by Aliza Layne, which is very much an MG aimed at an audience that's not me, but the art is great.

"The Stephen King Horror Library" comprises both Rosemary's Baby and The Haunting of Hill House, which I got for a steal on clearance at HPB a while ago. I haven't read either one yet, but I remember hearing an anecdote about the director of the film Rosemary's Baby. He felt obligated to be authentic, right down to seeking out the exact dress (blue and white checks) that Rosemary wore in a particular scene depicted in the book.

For the past, oh, say 20 years, I've been feeling guilty about the books I have not read since becoming a so-called "adult." SInce being "retired," I started out by throwing myself into a series of books. But reading It Can't Happen Here really messed me up. Since then I've thrown myself into comic books I've never read (such as the complete SA GL), and I don't feel a bit guilty. 

If you want something that's well-written and doesn't relate at all to our modern situation, Ira Levin's Rosemary's Baby would be a good choice. The Boys from Brazil by the same author would also fill the bill. 

Currently Re-Reading Quicksand, by Junichiro Tanizaki

The Baron said:

Currently Re-Reading The Key and Diary of a Mad Old Man, by Junichiro Tanizaki



The Baron said:

Currently Re-Reading:

The Makioka Sisters, by Junichiro Tanizaki

The Baron said:

Currently Re-Reading:

The Reed Cutter and Captain Shigemoto's Mother, by Junichiro Tanizaki

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