Just bringing this discussion over to ning...

What books are you reading right now that don't have a narrative driven by images as well as words?

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I've just started reading R.E. Howard's Conan series for the third time in my life. (I can't really call it "re-reading" because I've never made it all the way through, and I've started at a different point, reading stories I've never before read.) Rather than starting at the beginning of Conan's career chronologically (as I've done twice before), I've decided to start with the first two stories Howard wrote, which take place after Conan became King of Aquilonia. The third story written is the earliest (written by Howard) in Conan's career, but I've decided to move on to the novel The Hour of the Dragon, sixteenth of Howard's twenty Conan "yarns" and the last story (written by Howard) chronologically in Conan's career.
Jeff of Earth-J said:
I've just started reading R.E. Howard's Conan series for the third time in my life. (I can't really call it "re-reading" because I've never made it all the way through, and I've started at a different point, reading stories I've never before read.) Rather than starting at the beginning of Conan's career chronologically (as I've done twice before), I've decided to start with the first two stories Howard wrote, which take place after Conan became King of Aquilonia. The third story written is the earliest (written by Howard) in Conan's career, but I've decided to move on to the novel The Hour of the Dragon, sixteenth of Howard's twenty Conan "yarns" and the last story (written by Howard) chronologically in Conan's career.

I should try that sometime. I've read the first book probably 4 or 5 times, and then I lose interest really by the second or third one. Of course I would have to find them first to do that, no idea which box they are in.
It was the same way with me. In that first volume, only three of the seven stories are written by Howard.
Currently, I am reading Pikachu's Global Adventure, edited by Joseph Tobin, a series of essays about the rise and fall of Pokémon as a global cultural phenomenon. It's interesting stuff.
The Baron said:
Currently, I am reading Pikachu's Global Adventure, edited by Joseph Tobin, a series of essays about the rise and fall of Pokémon as a global cultural phenomenon. It's interesting stuff.

I'm sure it is. What interested me most about it all was that it was a global cultural phenomenon that obviously made tonnes of money, but those cartoons were so bloomin cheap!

Obviously part of the overall strategy. They probably underestimated how long it would be popular.

Is Pokemon short for 'pocket monsters'?
Figserello said:
The Baron said:
Currently, I am reading Pikachu's Global Adventure, edited by Joseph Tobin, a series of essays about the rise and fall of Pokémon as a global cultural phenomenon. It's interesting stuff.

I'm sure it is. What interested me most about it all was that it was a global cultural phenomenon that obviously made tonnes of money, but those cartoons were so bloomin cheap!

Obviously part of the overall strategy. They probably underestimated how long it would be popular.

Is Pokemon short for 'pocket monsters'?

Yes, it is short for "Pocket Monsters".

As for the cheapness of the animation, Japanese animated shows were often done on the cheap, going back at least as far as Doctor Tezuka's adaptation of his own Astro Boy, back in the 60's.
I've just finished reading and listening to A House to Let, a round-robin novel - or rather, collection of linked short stories - by Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Elizabeth Gaskell and Adelaide Anne Procter (whose section is a story in verse).
Luke Blanchard said:
I've just finished reading and listening to A House to Let, a round-robin novel - or rather, collection of linked short stories - by Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Elizabeth Gaskell and Adelaide Anne Procter (whose section is a story in verse).

Sounds interesting. How was it?
It's so-so. Elizabeth Gaskell's and Adelaide Anne Procter's stories aim to tug at the heartstrings. Dickens's solo story, about a sideshow dwarf, has some interesting details and briefly depicts mid-19th century sideshow life. Collins's solo part develops the framing story's mystery well. The framing story has some likeable elderly characters.

The novel was written for a Christmas edition of Household Words. It's one of several collaborative Christmas works Dickens was involved with.

I listened to most of the LibriVox audio version and read the rest via Project Gutenberg.
I'm reading The Return of the King - I recently started to reread TLOTR books. I hadn't read them since high school. They are even better than I remember. Thanks to Peter Jackson for helping me keep the characters straight.
Inspired by AMC's remake of The Prisoner (which I started watching just last night and may comment on in the TV forum), I'm re-reading Thomas Disch's 1967 adaptation of the original (which has just been re-released to coincide with the new televized version).
Currently, I'm reading Bombs Away, by John Steinbeck (Yes, the Grapes of Mice and Men guy). Apparently, back in 1942, the USAAF* asked him to write a book to explain to potential recruits, their families and the public at large how members of bomber crews were trained so that if they or someone they knewwere to be selected for such training, they would know what to expect.

It's very interesting stuff.

*Stands for "United States Army Air Forces"

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