Just bringing this discussion over to ning...

What books are you reading right now that don't have a narrative driven by images as well as words?

Views: 10674

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Sorry, Luke. No recommendations from me. I've never been a big horror fan, and what little I've read I didn't like.

It's not really my genre either, but I think I've long had an interest in monsters. Most of the horror that interests me, such as Universal horror movies, isn't actually scary. Apparently it once was, though.

I should clarify I'm talking prose here. The past few years I've come around on horror comics. Like other genres if they are done well, I do enjoy them.

I'm not a big horror fan either, but Richard Matheson is one writer in the genre who I would highly recommend. His short story collections are certainly worth a look.

Thanks, doc. I have a couple of those, so I'll make sure to get to them. The work of Matheson's I've read is I Am Legend.

I won't tell you why, but Stephen King's It should tickle your Universal spot.

Luke Blanchard said:

It's not really my genre either, but I think I've long had an interest in monsters. Most of the horror that interests me, such as Universal horror movies, isn't actually scary. Apparently it once was, though.

I recently  read The Company by Robert Littell. A decades spanning novel about the CIA. From the early 50s to the mid 90s. I loved this as we get to follow so many characters through the decades and see how they progress. Highly recommended.

I thought a nice segue of reading a novel about the Cold War was reading the Russian novel Nightwatch by Sergei Lukyaneno. The Nightwatch is basically a agency "the good guys"  called The Light Ones of the supernatural who make sure the Dark Ones are kept in check. It focuses on what amounts to a guy in charge of the IT department of the Moscow office, who is also a low-grade magician, who is drawn into field work. I've read the first two stories in the book, and I've enjoyed them quite a bit. Also, recommended.

Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) said:

I thought a nice segue of reading a novel about the Cold War was reading the Russian novel Nightwatch by Sergei Lukyaneno. The Nightwatch is basically a agency "the good guys" called The Light Ones of the supernatural who make sure the Dark Ones are kept in check. It focuses on what amounts to a guy in charge of the IT department of the Moscow office, who is also a low-grade magician, who is drawn into field work. I've read the first two stories in the book, and I've enjoyed them quite a bit. Also, recommended.

He also wrote two more books, Daywatch and Twilightwatch. There are two Russian Movies, Nightwatch and Daywatch, which were adapted from the series. They are on my Netflix list but I haven't gotten to them yet. They sound really good.

I'm currently about 2/3 of the way through William Gibson's latest novel, The Peripheral. His books are always worth waiting for (he's not very prolific, unlike most science fiction writers), and this one is no exception. At nearly 500 pages it's also longer than usual for him.

Ah thanks, Richard. I knew there was a series, but I didn't know the names of the other books.

Richard Willis said:

Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) said:

I thought a nice segue of reading a novel about the Cold War was reading the Russian novel Nightwatch by Sergei Lukyaneno. The Nightwatch is basically a agency "the good guys" called The Light Ones of the supernatural who make sure the Dark Ones are kept in check. It focuses on what amounts to a guy in charge of the IT department of the Moscow office, who is also a low-grade magician, who is drawn into field work. I've read the first two stories in the book, and I've enjoyed them quite a bit. Also, recommended.

He also wrote two more books, Daywatch and Twilightwatch. There are two Russian Movies, Nightwatch and Daywatch, which were adapted from the series. They are on my Netflix list but I haven't gotten to them yet. They sound really good.

Just when you thought it was safe, look who comes back. My last 2 books were The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales and Learning To Kill by Ed McBain. Grimm's was interesting, but I should not have read it straight through. By the time I finished it I was skimming stories because there is so much repetition and stories that made no sense whatsoever. Despite that I did enjoy most of it and reading the original classics, especially Cinderella, was a lot of fun. The McBain book was a collection of his short stories which came before h created the 87th Precinct. These stories were originally published under the names Evan Hunter, Richard Marsten, and Hunt Collins. There are authors notes for most of the stories. Highly recommended if you like mysteries. Up next, The Nero Wolfe Cookbook by Rex Stout and The Editors Of Viking Press.

Hi, Howard! I'd say more, but I have to go hide under my bed.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service