Just bringing this discussion over to ning...

What books are you reading right now that don't have a narrative driven by images as well as words?

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I appreciate the work of both the Bond newspaper strip artists although they have vastly different styles. Whereas McLusky maintains that classic newspaper adventure strip look, Horak's art is some the most stylized comic art I've ever seen. I believe Walt Simonson has mentioned him as an influence.

A few years ago I bought all of the Bond comics strip collections that cover the actual Fleming stories, so I'll be interested if you do a reading project on them.

"Horak's art is some the most stylized comic art I've ever seen."

That's what everyone I've spoken to who has an opinion says. I haven't really read much of his stuff, except the Spy Who Loved Me in the last few days. (I initially sopped reading when he took over the art.) I'm always open to reassessing my opinion. His style is growing on me but it is a jarring difference from McLusky's.

"I'll be interested if you do a reading project on them."

Keep your eye on "What Comics Have You Read Today?" because that's where it will be.

I have the two volumes collecting the Fleming adaptions so I'll be chiming in as well if you go ahead with it.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"I'll be interested if you do a reading project on them."

Keep your eye on "What Comics Have You Read Today?" because that's where it will be.

doc photo said:

I have the two volumes collecting the Fleming adaptions so I'll be chiming in as well if you go ahead with it.

We must be talking about different collections. The volumes I have are from Titan Books and are paperback, approximately 9x12 inches. There are seven of them covering the Fleming stories:

The titles are:

DR NO: also including Diamonds Are Forever and From Russia with Love

OCTOPUSSY: also including The Hildebrand Rarity

ON HER MAJESTY’S SECRET SERVICE: also including You Only Live Twice

THE SPY WHO LOVED ME: also including The Harpies, a non-Fleming story

CASINO ROYALE: also including Live and Let Die and Moonraker

GOLDFINGER: also including Risico, From a View to a Kill, For Your Eyes Only and Thunderball

THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN: also including The Living Daylights

"We must be talking about different collections."

The paperback ones from Titan came out first. I would have preferred to own them in hardcover, but I already had the entire set in tpb before the HCs were solicited.

Regarding a discussion, I would like to get caught up on The Walking Dead first. I read two collections over the weekend, and have one to go (v15). I plan to slot James Bond in after that, so I'll begin next week if not sooner.

Mine are published by Titan also but they are the Omnibus editions. The stories are collected in the same order as the original novels with the exception of The Spy Who Loved Me . Volume One covers Casino Royale through Thunderball, Volume 2 includes the remaining material up through Octopussy and The Living Daylights.

Richard Willis said:

We must be talking about different collections. The volumes I have are from Titan Books and are paperback, approximately 9x12 inches. There are seven of them covering the Fleming stories:

The strips were published in novel order (except The Spy Who Loved Me, as noted), but for some reason Titan chose to publish them out of order. They can be put in order, though, by simply rearranging the volumes (which is what I'm going to do). That puts the sequential introductions out of order, but oh well.

I finally read The Miseducation of Cameron Post, because I like the film adaptation. It's better than its YA designation, though I think it could have used a bit more editing. The film adapts the second half, really, and it's generally faithful. That first half, however, does an incredible job of capturing teen life for that character in a particular place and time.

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF JAMES T. KIRK: Over the years, when it strikes me I haven’t read a book in a while, I have often gotten back into the habit by reading a Star Trek book. Star Trek books are usually light, quick and entertaining. That ploy hasn’t worked in a while, though. Of the last two Star Trek books I have bought, one I didn’t finish and one I didn’t even start. The TV show Star Trek: Disovery, however, has put me in the mood to read some more Trek, so I went back to the one I bought most recent and didn’t even crack.

The autobiography of James T. Kirk is everything I expected it to be. It follows Kirk’s life from Earth, to Tarsus IV, to Starfleet Academy, to the Republic, to the Farragut, to his first command (mentioned on TV but never identified), to the Enterprise. It takes nearly every mention of his early life from the television show, places them in chronological order, and populates them with the appropriate characters. For example, his academy days deal with Ben Finney, Finnegan, Ruth, Professor Gill, Gary Mitchell and the Kobiashi Maru. It also establishes how, when and under what circumstances he met those who were to become his crew.

When it gets to the era of the TV series, it hits the highlights but glosses over some of the details. It fleshes out the end of the five year mission and what happened after that which led into the movies. It covers “the lost years” and focuses on events between films. It also details the behind-the-scenes politics of Star Fleet, and the differences between Admirals Nogura, Morrow, Cartwright and others. It takes Kirk’s story right up to the launch of the Enterprise-B. Much of this material has been covered elsewhere, but never so completely or with such consistency.

Nothing that occurs in print is considered canon, and this book does contradict or offer alternate versions of the same events from other books, but this one conforms almost exactly to my personal interpretation of these events. I was still so jazzed after finishing it that I re-read part one of the Generations novelization (which goes into much more details than the movie). Whereas this book tells the comprehensive story of Captain Kirk’s life, I wouldn’t recommend it to the casual fan; the hardcore fan is in a better place to fully appreciate all the “Easter eggs.” Either that, or I would recommend it to someone such as Amy Farah Fowler because it provides a quick overview of everything (the girlfriend of) a fan would need to know about the original crew from the TV show to the movies.

You gonna read the Picard one?

Oh, I didn't know there was a Picard one! Thanks for the heads up. I will be on the lookout for it, but I have my next several books already pre-selected. (Next up will be The Frankenstein Diaries.I'm currently about half way through my second rerading.) Out of curiousity, did you read The Autobiograpohy of James T. Kirk? I ask because you recently remarked that you see the first two pilots and the regular series as similar but slightly different continuities. This book might help smooth some of those over for you.

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