Just bringing this discussion over to ning...

What books are you reading right now that don't have a narrative driven by images as well as words?

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Just finished "Stan Lee and the Rise and Fall of the American Comic Book" which offers a very even handed analysis of Stan's career in comics. Have to admit feeling a bit sorry for Stan though, he never seemed satisfied with his success in comics and has spent the past thirty years trying to make a career in Hollywood, where he is well liked for his comic work but never taken seriously as a writer/producer.
I've recently finished Pirates! in an Adventure with Scientists by Gideon Defoe, a zany mock-naive pirate story with some decent gags, and listened to Librivox version of The Lost Stradivarius, a ghost story in the form of a short novel by J. Meade Faulkner.
Pronto by Elmore Leonard. He is usually a fun, fast read.
I've read several Elmore Leonard novels and it has never taken more than two days to get through them. Once you start reading one, you just can't stop.
Doc Beechler said:
New Michael Chabon non-fiction today!

Me, too. I read Doc's post last week, then I read a newspaper and a magazine review of it, then last weekend I heard the author interviewed on NPR. I don't need a building to fall on me! (Not usually, anyway.) It's a good book to travel with (which is what I'm doing now) because, as a collection of essays and other short pieces, it's easy to pick up and put down.
"The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas. This will probably take me a little bit longer to read than the Elmore Leonard book.
"A Princess of Mars." Every once in awhile, I feel like going on a Burroughs binge.
Finally finished the Heimskringla. And now, for something completely different...The Stranger, by Albert Camus. This choice was also inspired by Masterpiece Comics.
On to "The Gods of Mars."
Still finishing "Anna Karenina"- have about 150 pages to go after setting it aside for a couple of weeks (while I worked on another project and read mostly comic books).

Up next is a batch of baseball related books about the obscure corners of the game- the 19th century and the Negro Leagues.
The Baron said:
Finally finished the Heimskringla. And now, for something completely different...The Stranger, by Albert Camus. This choice was also inspired by Masterpiece Comics.

Well, that was a quick read.
The Baron said:
The Baron said:
Finally finished the Heimskringla. And now, for something completely different...The Stranger, by Albert Camus. This choice was also inspired by Masterpiece Comics.

Well, that was a quick read.

It's much harder in the original Klingon.

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