O.K., this one happened the same way my Silver-Age quizzes for my Deck Log column do.  I was driving along one morning and happened to think of an unusual detail about a television programme.  That led to recalling another, and then, another.  Pretty soon, I wondered if I could get a decent-sized trivia quiz out of it.

 

As this posting shows, I did.

 

The topic is something near and dear to our experience---television.  We all have one of those magic boxes in our homes, and we all have spent many faithful hours in front of it.  The question is:  how closely were you paying attention?  Because this quiz is slightly different.  I’ll get to that in a minute.

 

Here are the guidelines:

1. The questions come from television programmes which appeared on the “Big Three” networks, NBC and CBS and ABC, and the only acceptable answers come from the same pool. That was the only way to make it manageable.  It’s impossible to take the thousands of fourth-network, cable, and direct-TV series over the past thirty years into account.

 

2.  With the exception of the question involving The Tonight Show (number twelve), all of the questions and answers are limited to shows which appeared in prime time, i.e., 7:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.

3.  This is not a Silver-Age quiz. Any network prime-time programme which has aired since the inception of television to the present is eligible for consideration.

4.  Here is what makes this quiz slightly different: you are not required to know, or find out, any behind-the-scenes information about any given show.  The answers to all of the questions can be found simply by having watched television.

 

You will find questions like:

When William Frawley left the situation-comedy series My Three Sons, what was the reason given for his character, Bub, leaving the Douglas family?

 

What you won’t find is:

Why did William Frawley leave My Three Sons?

 

The latter question would require you to obtain behind-the-scenes knowledge of the reason for Frawley’s departure from the show.  The former question, however, only requires that you have viewed the pertinent episode.

 

In other words, it’s a genuine couch-potato quiz!

 

Finally, my usual caveat:  I am not all-knowing, not even on the subject of classic television.  It’s eminently possible that I’ve missed something.  Perhaps, even likely.  If anyone comes up with an answer that falls within the guidelines I’ve presented above and meets all the criteria posed by the question, then I’ll gladly award credit for it.  Besides, I always learn new stuff myself when that happens.

 

As with my comic-book quizzes, I’ve no objection to anyone referencing the Internet or even---gasp!---hard-copy material.  It’s my obligation to provide questions that are as Google-proof as possible.  I believe I have done so, but you fellows can get pretty creative in your thinking.

 

I think that’s everything . . . so let’s go!  

1.  This one has been plumbed so many times that the correct answer is definitely out there on the Internet, but it’s such a popular one that I had to lead off with it:

What was the first situation comedy to show a married couple sharing the same bed?

 

2.  Name three television series with the word “petticoat” in their titles.

3.  The detective series Mannix changed formats after the first season. Who was the only character, outside of Joe Mannix himself, to appear in episodes of both formats?

4.  What distinctive feature was shared by the theme songs of Gilligan’s Island, The Brady Bunch, and Mary Tyler Moore over the course of their network runs?

5.  Name two dramatic series that were spun off from situation comedies.

6.  Name the series in which the title character did not appear on camera until the second season.

7.  Who was the first captain of SSRN Seaview on Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea?

8.  What were the first and maiden names of Steve Douglas’ first wife on My Three Sons? O.K., how about the first and maiden names of his second wife, too?

9.  What sitcom featured sisters named Wilhelmina, Roberta, and Elizabeth?

10.  What was the radio call-sign for Sergeant Saunders’ squad on Combat!?

11.  Name a series in which the lead character was killed off in the final episode. (Note:  the lead character, the star, not just a regular character.)

 12.  On The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, when sidekick Ed McMahon was absent, bandleader Doc Severinsen replaced Ed as the announcer and second-banana, while Tommy Newsome took over leading the band. But, on that rare occasion when both McMahon and Severinsen were off on the same night, Newsome took over as announcer and second-banana to Johnny---but who stepped in to lead the band?

13.  Name three sitcoms where the four lead characters played themselves, in a fictional setting.

14.  I’m not making this one up, folks: what situation comedy changed to a spy series halfway through its run?

15.  The Fugitive is often credited as being the first series to resolve its premise in the last episode of its run. However, there were two series that did the same thing before Doctor Kimble caught the one-armed man.  Name them. 

And there's an American-produced series that was network-run in Canada and syndicated here in the U.S. that also beat out The Fugitive by ending its premise first.   Extra credit if you can name it, too.

Good luck!

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11.  Name a series in which the lead character was killed off in the final episode. (Note:  the lead character, the star, not just a regular character.)

Hmmm .... I know of a show from the '90s called Action, which starred Jay Mohr as a cranky Hollywood agent. It got canceled at the end of its first season, so the producers inserted a scene in the now-series finale in which the agent had a heart attack and die -- at 9:30 on a Thursday night, the show's timeslot.

But it was on Fox, so it doesn't fit.

Commander,

May 27 works just fine.  I hope you and Mrs. Benson have a great trip.

Commander Benson said:

Ordinarily, I would have provided the answers along about now.  But the Good Mrs. Benson and I are about to leave on a cruise to Alaska, and we won't be able to rely on regular Internet access.  I really want to see the discussion when I present the answers, so if you fellows can wait until 27 May, that's when I'll cough them up.

In the meantime, I can provide some statistics.

Of the fifteen questions:

Seven of them were nailed solidly.

One question got a response so close to the right answer that it was, in essence, correct, and credit is given.

Two were given different answers than the ones I had been looking for, but after research, I have to allow that they met the guidelines and the criteria of the question---and I consider them correct responses.

Three questions have all been answered incorrectly.

Two of them nobody's tackled at all.

Incidentally, Luke, I agree, cliffhanger deaths are ambiguous and shouldn't count---and they don't.  The correct answer to question number eleven is the definitive death of the lead in the last episode of the series, with no room for doubt that the character is dead.

Keep trying.  I'm impressed as all get out at how well all of you have done so far---including two answers which weren't what I had in mind, but counted.

Regarding #12, there are a number of internet sites that say it was Shelly Cohen, including Mark Evanier’s obituary for Tommy Newsom (2007)—that obit does give his name as Shelley, but other sites have it as Shelly.

...#11: NICHOLS, starring James Garner

3.  IMBd’s list of the full cast for Mannix lists that Martin Braddock played Gordon Parker in seven season 1 episodes and in the 3rd episode of season 2 (“Pressure Point”).

That’s the best I’ve got.

1.  This one has been plumbed so many times that the correct answer is definitely out there on the Internet, but it’s such a popular one that I had to lead off with it:

What was the first situation comedy to show a married couple sharing the same bed?

According to this from MeTV, the first animated comedy to show a married couple sharing the same bed was The Flintstones!

ClarkKent_DC said:

Hmmm .... I know of a show from the '90s called Action, which starred Jay Mohr as a cranky Hollywood agent.... But it was on Fox, so it doesn't fit.

I can think of British cases. (When the Boat Comes In, One Foot in the Grave.)

6. Braken's World (Hat-tip: Wikipedia.)

I'm back, gang!  Oh, and I recommend Alaska highly as a place to visit.  I had a few matters pile up on me while we were gone and I had to wade through those first.  But now I can get to the fun stuff, such as the answers to my television quiz.

First, the tallies.  An impressive job by all hands who participated.  These were not easy questions, by any stretch, and everyone who played got at least one right.  By my count, Luke Blanchard was the first to provide the correct answers to five questions.  Dave Palmer was first in with four right responses; ClarkKent_DC, two, and Jeff of Earth-J and Emerkeith Davyjack, one apiece.  Philip Portelli also got one right, by default.

One of them no-one got right. 

Frankly, I expected to have a great many more go unanswered, so it's credit to all of you folks.

And now, the answers!

1.  This one has been plumbed so many times that the correct answer is definitely out there on the Internet, but it’s such a popular one that I had to lead off with it:

What was the first situation comedy to show a married couple sharing the same bed?

As a youth, I had heard this one debated for years.  It was The Brady Bunch.  No, it was The Munsters.  No, it was I Love Lucy.  About twenty-five years ago, I came across the actual sitcom to first depict a married couple in the same bed.  I don't even remember where I read the information, but it was obscure, so obscure that for several more years, the debate continued to wage.

Then, somehow, that obscure correct answer broke through, and now most sites, including Wikipedia, properly list it as the first sitcom to depict a married couple in bed together.  In fact, one of the books I recently bought to take on the cruise with me contains the same information.

That show was Mary Kay and Johnny (1947-50, variously on CBS, NBC, and the DuMont Network), starring real-life married couple Johnny and Mary Kay Sterns.  They played a bank employee and his not-dumb-but-somewhat-free-thinking wife who gets mixed up in zany situations.  In other words, typical sitcom fare for the time---except for being the first, and for a long time, the only, married couple to be seen sharing the same bed.  And Mary Kay was the first sitcom wife to have her portrayer's real-life pregnancy be shown on air and worked into the plotline.

Luke Blanchard got this one.

 

2.  Name three television series with the word “petticoat” in their titles.

ClarkKent_DC nailed this right off:  Petticoat Junction (CBS, 1963-70) and Pistols 'n' Petticoats (which I thought would be the stumper; CBS, 1966-7) and Operation Petticoat (ABC, 1977-9).

 

3.  The detective series Mannix changed formats after the first season. Who was the only character, outside of Joe Mannix himself, to appear in episodes of both formats?

Another one I thought would befuddle everyone.  After all, most folks don't even remember that Mannix had a different format in its first season.  And, if anyone stumbled across the three-part piece I wrote on Mannix's first season here, it wouldn't give the answer away.  But Dave Palmer stuck with it and finally nailed the right character.

Between the first and second season, Joe Mannix stopped working for Intertect, the computer-based investigations firm run by his old friend, Lew Wickersham, and became a more conventional private eye, with a secretary and police contact.  The new season didn't make much reference to Joe's career change.  In the first episode of the new season, he mentions it casually to a new client, and in a mid-season episode, he's interviewing a computer programmer at her workplace and at one point, presses the proper buttons for her, explaining, "I used to work in a place like this."

But the third episode of the season, "Pressure Point", airing on 12 October 1968, has the strongest connexion to the old format.  (My guess is, it was probably the first episode of the second season to be filmed and got aired out of order.)

One of the recurring characters in Mannix's first season was Intertect computer operator Gordon Parker, played by Martin Braddock.  In the second season's "Pressure Point", Mannix's secretary, Peggy Fair, defies her boss's principle to have nothing more to do with his old company by going to Intertect and requesting Parker's help.  Parker mentions that feelings toward Joe Mannix are raw at Intertect, and that Lew Wickersham is going to expect payment for the work.  It's the only time when the viewer ever sees the Intertect computer room or anyone from Intertect ever again in the series.

4.  What distinctive feature was shared by the theme songs of Gilligan’s Island, The Brady Bunch, and Mary Tyler Moore over the course of their network runs?

CK got so close to this one---he stated "each show re-recorded the theme for a second season"---that, in essence, he got it right.  More accurately, the answer was all three shows changed the lyrics of its theme songs for their seconds seasons.

5.  Name two dramatic series that were spun off from situation comedies.

As Jeff of Earth-J pointed out, Mary Tyler Moore begat Lou Grant (CBS, 1977-82), and M*A*S*H begat Trapper John, M.D. (CBS, 1979-86).

6.  Name the series in which the title character did not appear on camera until the second season.

This was the question that actually started this whole thing, because it displays one of the quirks of series television that occurs when the producers try to shore up a flagging effort.

Bracken's World (NBC, 1969-70) ran for a season and a half, and told the stories of the employees of the prominent film company Century Studios.  Since the stories were supposed to be about the company's directors and writers and actors and actresses, the gimmick was that the head of the studio, John Bracken, was never seen.  Most of the time, he was usually "away on business".  On a few occasions, his voice (provided by Warren Stevens) was heard on the telephone.

The ratings floundered, so to inject a big name into the show, the second season featured Leslie Nielsen, still in his ultra-serious image then, as John Bracken, who became the lead character.  Didn't help much.  The ratings tanked, and the show was cancelled four months into season two.

Luke got this one.

7.  Who was the first captain of SSRN Seaview on Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea?

As Dave Palmer stated, the first skipper of SSRN Seaview was Commander John Phillips (played by William Hudson).  He was killed off in the first five minutes of the first episode, "Eleven Days to Zero", of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (ABC, 1964-8).

8.  What were the first and maiden names of Steve Douglas’ first wife on My Three Sons? O.K., how about the first and maiden names of his second wife, too?

A doubly tough question.  In the first place, because the first Mrs. Douglas' first name was never mentioned on the air.  In the second place, because there was a trap laid in the maiden name of the second Mrs. Douglas.

Dave Palmer took a stab at it, and admirably, pieced together the first and maiden names of the original Mrs. Douglas, whom, according to the show's timeline, died six years before the first episode of My Three Sons (ABC, CBS, 1960-72).  It was, indeed, Louise O'Casey.

Let's give Dave a lot of credit here.  It was well established in the show that the Douglas boys' live-in grandfather, Bub O'Casey, was Steve Douglas' father-in-law.  So the late Mrs. Douglas' maiden name was obviously O'Casey.  But the only time her first name was ever revealed was in the fourth-season episode "The Proposals", airing on 28 November 1963.  And interestingly enough, the viewers never heard her name mentioned in the episode, which featured a flashback to when Steve proposed to her.

We don't learn Mrs. Douglas' first name until the running of the closing credits, when we discover that her name was "Louise".

As to the second Mrs Douglas, though, this is going to be one of those head-slapping, how-could-I-have-missed-that moments for Dave.

In the first episode of the tenth season, Steve meets a widow named Barbara Harper, who has a six-year-old daughter, Dorothy, nicknamed "Dodie by her mother (and "Dodo" by most of the viewers).  I'm guessing you've caught on to what was wrong with Dave's answer of "Barbara Harper" by the word I emphasised in that sentence.

That's right, Barbara had been married once before, to a man named Larry Harper.  Thus, "Harper" wasn't her maiden name.  Her maiden name is known only by the fact that Barbara lives with her mother (until Barbara marries Steve in the season's eighth episode and moves into the Douglas house).  Played by Eleanor Audley, Barbara's mother's name is "Mrs. Vincent".  Thus, Barbara's maiden name was "Vincent".

I'm still giving you big points, Dave, for doping out "Louise O'Casey".

9.  What sitcom featured sisters named Wilhelmina, Roberta, and Elizabeth?

As Luke Blanchard knew, in the backstory of Petticoat Junction, William (Bill) and Katherine (Kate) Bradley named their three daughters Wilhelmina Josephine, Roberta Josephine, and Elizabeth Josephine, a.k.a. Billie Jo, Bobbi Jo, and Betty Jo.

10.  What was the radio call-sign for Sergeant Saunders’ squad on Combat!?

Every kid who grew up watching Combat! (ABC, 1962-7) heard Sergeant Saunders call into headquarters on the radio, "Checkmate King Two, this is White Rook, over!"  Dave must have also grown up then.

11.  Name a series in which the lead character was killed off in the final episode. (Note:  the lead character, the star, not just a regular character.)

Emerkeith Davyjack chimed in with the right answer to this one.

James Garner starred in Nichols (NBC, 1971-2), about an Army officer named Frank Nichols who, just before the outbreak of World War I, resigns his commission and returns to his home town, only to run afoul of the town's "boss", Ma Ketchum.  Ma blackmails Nichols (whose first name is never used) into becoming the town sheriff.

Garner's Nichols was pretty much Bart Maverick, slightly more hapless.  Because the format of the show rarely allowed Nichols to come out on top, unlike Maverick, who did, often as not, viewers didn't warm to the character or the show, and the ratings were dismal.

In another radical move by producers to rescue a sinking show, the last episode of the season ("All in the Family", airing 14 March 1972) opens with Nichols being gunned down and killed.  After his funeral, Nichols' heretofore-unmentioned twin brother, Jim, arrives in town.  Garner plays Jim Nichols as a more traditional Western hero, made of sterner stuff.  Nichols Number Two spends the episode tracking down and apprehending his brother's killer.  But the sea change came too late.  The show was cancelled.

 12.  On The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, when sidekick Ed McMahon was absent, bandleader Doc Severinsen replaced Ed as the announcer and second-banana, while Tommy Newsome took over leading the band. But, on that rare occasion when both McMahon and Severinsen were off on the same night, Newsome took over as announcer and second-banana to Johnny---but who stepped in to lead the band?

Another one I thought nobody'd get, but Dave Palmer did.  The number-five man in the hierarchy, after Carson, McMahon, Severinsen, and Newsome, was Shelly Cohen, the show's assistant musical director.  I, myself, only remember two or three times when he fronted the band because Ed and Doc were off and Newsome took the second chair.

13.  Name three sitcoms where the four lead characters played themselves, in a fictional setting.

Philip Portelli named the first two right off:  The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet (ABC, 1952-66), starring Ozzie, Harriet, David, and Rick Nelson, and The Monkees (NBC, 1966-8), starring Mickey Dolenz, Davy Jones, Mike Nesmith, and Peter Tork.

Philip's third offering was The Jack Benny Program (CBS, NBC, 1950-65).  Luke Blanchard felt that the third part of the answer was The Abbott and Costello Show (CBS, 1952-4).  I agonised over both of these third submissions.  Yes, in both cases, several of the characters played themselves in a fictional situation, and, particularly, in the case of The Abbott and Costello Show, I waffled over counting them or not.  Finally, I decided that neither show could be considered because only one (Jack Benny) or two (Abbott and Costello) of their respective characters were credited in the shows' opening credits.  Thus, the other characters playing themselves could not be considered "leads".  (In Ozzie and Harriet and The Monkees, all four characters are billed in the opening credits.

But it doesn't matter, because further research, in preparing this post, forces me to retroactively change the question to require only two sitcoms, and Ozzie and Harriet and The Monkees were the correct answers.

The original third was The New Monkees (remember them?; likely not, if you blinked in 1987), starring Jared Chandler, Dino Kovas, Marty Ross, and Larry Saltis as themselves.  But I cannot use that show because of my own rules.  In checking for the network on which it ran, I just discovered that The New Monkees was a syndicated programme.  While that in itself did not disqualify the show, I did some research on the CBS and NBC and ABC prime-time line-ups in 1987, and The New Monkees did not appear.  Thus, whatever networks bought the show, none of them appeared to be from the Big Three.  And since the question requires that a show have appeared on CBS, NBC, or ABC, The New Monkees doesn't meet the criteria.

. . . 

14.  I’m not making this one up, folks: what situation comedy changed to a spy series halfway through its run?

If you thought producers went way out into left field to save Bracken's World or Nichols, wait until you hear about this one, that Luke got right.

The John Forsythe Show (NBC, 1965-6) began as a situation comedy about a retired U.S. Air Force major, John Foster, who inherits a private girls' school from his late aunt.  John Forsythe played Major Foster; Elsa Lanchester, the school principal; Ann B. Davis, the physical-education instructor; and Guy Marks, the handyman and former sergeant under Foster's command.  The humour was supposed to derive from womaniser and military man Foster's interaction with his eclectic staff and a schoolful of fun-loving, nubile adolescent girls.

Hijinx did not ensue, so in an attempt to bail out the show by jumping onto the spy bandwagon which was popular at the time, The John Forsythe Show was turned into an espionage series, beginning with the twenty-first episode, "Funny, You Don't Look Like a Spy", airing on 21 February 1966.  The new format explained that Major Foster had been recalled to active duty as a secret agent, using the school as his cover.  His former sergeant was the only member of the school staff in on the secret.  Miss Lanchester's rôle was minimised and Miss Davis' character was dropped.

Since you've probably never heard of this show, you can guess how successful the revamp was.

15.  The Fugitive is often credited as being the first series to resolve its premise in the last episode of its run. However, there were two series that did the same thing before Doctor Kimble caught the one-armed man.  Name them. 

And there's an American-produced series that was network-run in Canada and syndicated here in the U.S. that also beat out The Fugitive by ending its premise first.   Extra credit if you can name it, too.

This is one where Luke went out on his own, and found a correct answer that I had forgotten about.

The two series I had in mind were Route 66 (CBS, 1960-4) and Hank (NBC, 1965-6).

Route 66 concerned two young men who travelled across the United States in a Corvette, stopping at various locations to learn about the human condition.  In the final episode, "Where There's a Will, There's a Way", airing on 20 March 1964, their wandering comes to an end, as Tod Stiles (portrayed by Martin Milner) gets married and settles down, while his fellow journeyer, Lincoln Case (played by Glenn Corbett, who replaced George Maharis as "Buz Murdock" in the last season) reconciles with his estranged family in Texas (established in the first couple of episodes to feature the Case character).

Hank, starring Dick Kallman, told the story of a young man, who is forced to raise his kid sister, Tina, after their parents are killed in an auto accident.  Hank desires a college degree but cannot afford the tuition.  He also has to support Tina, so to kill two birds with one stone, he takes odd jobs on the campus, and operates several service businesses (laundry delivery, lunch wagon, etc.) there, as well.  This provides him the opportunity to sit in on college courses under an assumed name and pick up college credits.

In the final episode, "Operation: Matriculation", airing on 15 April 1966, Hank's duplicity is exposed, but circumstances combine to see the college award him a full scholarship, thus he becomes a registered student.

Luke came up with Hank, but he also found a series which fits the requirement of having its premise concluded in the final episode before The Fugitive did so.  

The Man Who Never Was (ABC, 1966-7), starred Robert Lansing as American spy Peter Murphy, who, in the first episode, in targeted for assassination by the espionage forces of a hostile government behind the Iron Curtain.  While fleeing across Europe, Murphy crosses paths with Mark Wainwright, an influential and somewhat unscrupulous millionaire industrialist.  Wainwright is Murphy's exact double, and they pass each other when Murphy ducks into a tavern with the Communist assassins hot on his tail.  Murphy goes in, Wainwright comes out, and the killers gun down Wainwright, believing he is Murphy.

Murphy falls into Wainwright's life, at first, simply to get away from the enemy agents, but his handler, Colonel Forbes, persuades him to continue posing as Wainwright, whose position as a wealthy expatriot gives him access to to valuable information on the other side.  The plan hits a snag when Wainwright's wife, Eva, immediately spots him for an impostor.  (Which was a refreshing twist from most "phoney double" plots, where the wife takes forever to catch on.)

However, Eva has motives of her own.  The real Wainwright was about to divorce her, without a dime.  As long as she helps Murphy keep up his pose, she gets to hang on to her luxuriant lifestyle.  As the show progresses, though, she develops a personal interest in Murphy, who treats her more kindly than the abusive Wainwright did.

Gradually, Murphy and Eva fall in love, and in the final episode, "I Take This Woman", Murphy manipulates the enemy agents into dropping the death order against him, thus free him to drop the masquerade as Wainwright.  Before doing so, he arranges the transfer of most of Wainwright's fortune into Eva's hands, and the two of them get married, with Murphy retiring from the spy business.

This episode aired on 04 January 1967, almost eight months before Doctor Kimble was exonerated of the murder of his wife.

It was a good find by Luke, and even more evidence that, despite the popular notion, The Fugitive was not the first television series to end its storyline.

As for that Canadian series I mentioned, well, I haven't been able to find much of any information on the show that Luke mentioned, Hudson's Bay.  So I cannot attest to whether it fits the criteria of the question.  

The show I had in mind was Cannonball, which aired on the CBC Television network in 1958-9.  Cannonball related the adventures of two truckers, Mike Malone (played by Paul Birch) and Jerry Austin (William Campbell) who hauled cargo for the fictitious Toronto-based C & A Transport Company, Ltd.  Malone, a married man with two children, is a steadying influence on his younger, occasionally impulsive partner, Austin.

In the final episode, "Tunnel Eyes", airing on CBC on 13 July 1959, Mike learns that Jerry has an opportunity to go back and finish college.  He also discovers that Jerry will not leave his partnership with MIke to do so.  So when Malone's annual physical is due, he fakes having tunnel vision, the loss of his peripheral vision, during his eye test.  This disqualifies Mike from driving trucks, so he takes a desk job for C & A Transport, freeing Jerry to return to college.

And that's it, folks.  I wanted you guys to have as much fun learning the answers as I had in ginning up the questions.  I hope so, anyway, because I don't think I could do this one, again.

Impressive as always, Commander. Unless the topic was "Early Doctor Who", I wouldn't dare get into a 1960's TV trivia contest against you!  :)

I do vaguely recall The New Monkees but I knew that it was syndicated. I think that it was more a Saturday morning show than primetime though.

Commander,

That was great fun.  And, boy, did I fall into your trap. What little I remember the Dodie episodes were weak; I’ve made no attempt to ever watch them again.

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