Today I was SO worn out, I did something I can hardly believe...  With very few exceptions, I have not watched STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION since it was first-run (24 YEARS ago).  So far today, I have just watched the first 14 episodes in a row!!!
 
    You know what's funny?  The show is actually fun to watch in a sort-of tacky way.  Some of the character quirks are amusing, before they became really annoying.  And I'm reminded of some of the early relationship dynamics, which, it seems to me, got totally screwed over the longer the show was on the air.
 
    Like-- it's obvious Picard & Beverly are attracted to each other.  WHY did they spend most of the run not having this go anywhere?  Then there's Will Riker & Deanna Troi, who the moment they meet are like a really bad, awkward retread of Will Decker & Ilia.  They're so stiff at first it's unbelieveable.  I think all the acting got 10 times better after the 2-hour pilot.  Anyway, the story that introduces Lwaxana was a hoot, and also showed that, despite whatever the hell the problem is, Will & Deanna do somehow care for each other deeply.  So... WHY didn't it EVER go anywhere (until the 2nd feature film?).  Both Wesley & Data are far less annoying here than they later became.
 
    Strange but true:  while I saw the show from the first episode (and taped every single one of them), my Mom never saw it until somewhere in the 3rd or 4th season.  And when she did, she got HOOKED, big-time.  She started watching it every time it was on.  Since they got to running the stories twice a week, that means, while I saw each story ONCE, she saw each one FOUR TIMES!!!
 
    At some point, she got around to seeing reruns of the 1st season.  I always remember walking thru the dining room, where she spent most of her time sitting watching the small tv on the table, and noting she was watching the 2-hour pilot.  And she looked at me and says, "This is the DUMBEST story I've ever seen!"  That's after having seen dozens (maybe a hundred or more) later ones.
 
    I've noted I have a lot more tolerance for "bad" films when I can't sleep, and that may account for my being able to sit thru so much of this today.
 
    It's a shame that my favorite woman on the show's 1st season, Tasha, got killed off suddenly when Denise Crosby announced she wanted to quit the show.  She may not have been my favorite kind of woman as far as face or personality, but I have a feeling I might have gotten along with her.  By the episode "Angel One", she seemed to be loosening up a lot.  I can't understand the complaint about her "not having enough to do".  Her movie career sure didn't take off...  (Doesn't that seem to be a running thing in the 80's and beyond?  People quitting successful shows and then regretting it?)
 
    A few times early-on, I found myself thinking how this might have gone if Paramount hadn't been so cheap.  After the tremendous success of STAR TREK IV, the push was on to finally do a new tv series.  But because the actors' salaries kept getting bigger and bigger by then, the decision was made, purely monetary, to do an entirely new series, with CHEAPER actors.
 
    What stands out is the thought that the "cruise ship" version of the Enterprise was said to be a brand-new ship fresh out of dry dock (just like at the end of ST4).  And the "battle bridge" seen in Ep.1 was clearly the bridge from the movies.
 
    I liked how about 10 episodes in, you finally saw a rectangular hallway (like on the old show).  Those octogonal vertical halls from the movies get on my nerves.

Views: 1201

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I just watched "Skin Of Evil".  It figures they'd have Joe Stefano writing a story about an ugly, totally alien creature who's pure evil.  The earliest ST episodes always felt like THE OUTER LIMITS in color, here we got to have both at once.

 

Of course, TV GUIDE blew the surprise by announcing she was leaving the show (or did they reveal she was going to get killed? I forget).  The shock was the way she was bumped off so casually, early into the story. I think the idea was specifically to treat her as a "red shirt", as even if audiences knew she was going to die, they wouldn't expect THAT. I think it hurt to watch it more the 2nd time, because I went in knowing how she'd die, and that she wasn't coming back (not really).  Plus, I think I genuinely got to like her character more this time around.  It sure seemed to me she got a lot of screen time focusing on her character over the course of her stories. I kept imagining how the show might have been better if she'd stuck around.

 

The last time I remember seeing her on TV was in a 7th-season episode of HUNTER-- when the show had really gone to hell on every level. It was, as I recall, the episode that made me stop watching it, as it violated the main character's personality by having him stick up for the rights of an accused criminal, rather than the victim of the crime, which had always been his thing. I must not have been the only one getting fed up with all the bad changes to the show-- about 2 weeks after I stopped watching, NBC pulled it off the air!

"Skin of Evil," that's it. I don't remember TNG titles as well as I do TOS. I watched TNG from the beginning (up until that time I had been a devoted viewer od SNL, but even though the one is long since off the air, I haven't seen the other since), and I was also a member of that rip-off video tape club. I've got all seven seasons on space-eating VHS; wish I had it on DVD instead. I've seen the early seasons more than one, the last two or three just once each. I watched DS9 and Voyager and Enterprise, too, but I've never seen any of those more than once [except for "Blood Oath" (3 TOS Klingons), "Trials and Tribblations" (The Trouble with Tribbles sequel) and "Flashback" (with Captain Sulu and the Excelsior)]. The St. Louis market lost Voyager when UPN launched. Enterprise cancelled just as it was getting good.

 

TNG doesn't hold up as well as TOS (IMHO).

"Trials and Tribbleations"
Right, right. (I was confusing the title of an episode of Voyager with the content of an episode of DS9.) I liked both of those and watched all three I mentioned multiple times. [Above post edited.]
Derrick Ferguson said:

I could go with your take on situation if it wasn't for the fact that Denise Crosby knew going in that TNG was an ensemble show.  So how much screen time did she realistically expect to get with 10 other actors in the cast?  But then again, we don't know what the producers told her and they might have deliberately mislead her about her character's development to get her to sign up.  It could well have been like a story I read where the producers of Gilligan's Island tried to get Raquel Welch to sign up for the show by telling her it was about a famous movie star who gets stranded on a deserted island with six of her fans.


ClarkKent_DC said:

It's a shame that my favorite woman on the show's 1st season, Tasha, got killed off suddenly when Denise Crosby announced she wanted to quit the show.  She may not have been my favorite kind of woman as far as face or personality, but I have a feeling I might have gotten along with her.  By the episode "Angel One", she seemed to be loosening up a lot.  I can't understand the complaint about her "not having enough to do".  Her movie career sure didn't take off...  (Doesn't that seem to be a running thing in the 80's and beyond?  People quitting successful shows and then regretting it?)


I don't know ... did Denise Crosby regret leaving Star Trek: The Next Generation?

 

As for the complaint about not having enough to do, I can understand it. Acting isn't a 9-to-5 job, and any given actor might think being part of an ensemble when you have only one two-minute scene in any given episode because there are 11 cast members plus guest stars to include isn't what you signed up for.



One may have certain beliefs or expectations going in on a new show, but as the show finds its footing, things change. Look at The West Wing. It was sold on the premise that Rob Lowe was the star, and it was supposed to be about the White House staff, not the president. The president character wasn't even in half the first 13 episodes. Then the show takes off, and it's about everybody but Rob Lowe's character -- and all the other co-stars got a raise and he didn't. I think it's fair to say that wasn't what he signed up for.

 

Even in an ensemble show, it's not unreasonable for any given actor to want more than the occasional moment to shine.

Look how Will Riker and Doctor Crusher were pushed back in importance because Data and Worf became more interesting!

As I said, having just watched every Tasha ep. back-to-back in VERY quick order (I can't remember ever doing a thing like this before, except with some sitcoms), it seems to me for the size of the cast, Tasha DID have a lot of screen-time and development. (She loosened up a lot just before they bumped her off. Gee, just like Pru on CHARMED.)

 

I forget... why did Gates McFadden leave after a year-- and then, come back?  (It was very peculiar for Wesley to continue to be on the ship, but not his mother.)

 

A minor bit of casting caught my eye... in the ep. about the old Admiral whose experimental treatment caused him to become younger as he went (I can never remember the names of most of the late-model ST eps, either), the "terrorist" with the hostages was played by Michael Pataki.  While for decades, I always remembered him for his roles in McCLOUD, WKRP and even HALLOWEEN 4, it was only recently that I realized he was probably most well-known for playing one of the most outstanding Klingons in ST history.  People remember John Colicos, William Campbell, and Michael Ansara, and sometimes even Tige Andrews... but Michael Pataki was the one who uttered the immortal dialogue...

 

"You're right. I should. I didn't mean to say that the Enterprise should be HAULING garbage. I meant to say that the Enterprise should hauled away AS garbage!"

 

All those dozens of times I saw that episode, and I never recognized him!

The reason for the year gap in Dr. Beverly Crusher's crew assignment was two fold:
First, the producers/writers just didn't feel the chemistry between Picard and Beverly was going anywhere, and they wanted an antagonist in Dr. Kathrine Pulaski to needle Picard, and vice versa.  So, Beverly was out, and Pulaski was in.

Second, after a year of that, it was decided that Beverly was at Star Fleet for a crew rotation additional training, and so, her time was up, and her relationship with the crew and with Picard was "warmed up".  Suddenly, they had ROLES and CONCERNS for the character, where as at first, she was just there to confirm that it was a "strange sensor readings" in Sick Bay that had no known explanation, Captain.

 

PS: How could you not remember the character's name when the admiral regresses... it was carefully chosen:  Kronos (Greek, I believe, for "Time").  Therefore, the admiral was actually fighting against Time.

"We LIKE the Enterprise!  We-- we REALLY DO!!!"  (feel free to continue this rant)
Henry R. Kujawa said:
(I can never remember the names of most of the late-model ST eps, either)

i have given most of them (arguably) better titles in my own mind. Now when it comes time to discuss them, I can never remember if the title I know them by is the official title or my own.

[pedant]Technically, "chronos" is ancient Greek for time, while Kronos was the father of Zeus (identified by the Romans with Saturn).

 

The Theoi website's page on Kronos cites a passage from Cicero in which he identifies Kronos with time, so the association of the two words goes back to antiquity. The website thinks the etymology of "Kronos" as meaning "time" is correct, but I don't think this is the standard view. Wikipedia's page on the god cites alternative explanations of the name (scroll down to "Names and Comparative Mythology").[/pedant]

"i have given most of them (arguably) better titles in my own mind. Now when it comes time to discuss them, I can never remember if the title I know them by is the official title or my own."

 

A pet peeve of mine is TV shows without episode titles, which then, later, online for example, have "official" titles.  In all cases where I've tapes such shows I've given them my own titles for reference, and I always prefer my own titles to supposed "official" ones.  (If they have actual titles, they should put them onscreen!)

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2019   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service