Today I was SO worn out, I did something I can hardly believe...  With very few exceptions, I have not watched STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION since it was first-run (24 YEARS ago).  So far today, I have just watched the first 14 episodes in a row!!!
 
    You know what's funny?  The show is actually fun to watch in a sort-of tacky way.  Some of the character quirks are amusing, before they became really annoying.  And I'm reminded of some of the early relationship dynamics, which, it seems to me, got totally screwed over the longer the show was on the air.
 
    Like-- it's obvious Picard & Beverly are attracted to each other.  WHY did they spend most of the run not having this go anywhere?  Then there's Will Riker & Deanna Troi, who the moment they meet are like a really bad, awkward retread of Will Decker & Ilia.  They're so stiff at first it's unbelieveable.  I think all the acting got 10 times better after the 2-hour pilot.  Anyway, the story that introduces Lwaxana was a hoot, and also showed that, despite whatever the hell the problem is, Will & Deanna do somehow care for each other deeply.  So... WHY didn't it EVER go anywhere (until the 2nd feature film?).  Both Wesley & Data are far less annoying here than they later became.
 
    Strange but true:  while I saw the show from the first episode (and taped every single one of them), my Mom never saw it until somewhere in the 3rd or 4th season.  And when she did, she got HOOKED, big-time.  She started watching it every time it was on.  Since they got to running the stories twice a week, that means, while I saw each story ONCE, she saw each one FOUR TIMES!!!
 
    At some point, she got around to seeing reruns of the 1st season.  I always remember walking thru the dining room, where she spent most of her time sitting watching the small tv on the table, and noting she was watching the 2-hour pilot.  And she looked at me and says, "This is the DUMBEST story I've ever seen!"  That's after having seen dozens (maybe a hundred or more) later ones.
 
    I've noted I have a lot more tolerance for "bad" films when I can't sleep, and that may account for my being able to sit thru so much of this today.
 
    It's a shame that my favorite woman on the show's 1st season, Tasha, got killed off suddenly when Denise Crosby announced she wanted to quit the show.  She may not have been my favorite kind of woman as far as face or personality, but I have a feeling I might have gotten along with her.  By the episode "Angel One", she seemed to be loosening up a lot.  I can't understand the complaint about her "not having enough to do".  Her movie career sure didn't take off...  (Doesn't that seem to be a running thing in the 80's and beyond?  People quitting successful shows and then regretting it?)
 
    A few times early-on, I found myself thinking how this might have gone if Paramount hadn't been so cheap.  After the tremendous success of STAR TREK IV, the push was on to finally do a new tv series.  But because the actors' salaries kept getting bigger and bigger by then, the decision was made, purely monetary, to do an entirely new series, with CHEAPER actors.
 
    What stands out is the thought that the "cruise ship" version of the Enterprise was said to be a brand-new ship fresh out of dry dock (just like at the end of ST4).  And the "battle bridge" seen in Ep.1 was clearly the bridge from the movies.
 
    I liked how about 10 episodes in, you finally saw a rectangular hallway (like on the old show).  Those octogonal vertical halls from the movies get on my nerves.

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Henry R. Kujawa said:
If they have actual titles, they should put them onscreen!


Amen! Preach it, brother!
You make me think of the gag on Police Squad, where the title on-screen would be different from the title the voice-over man would announce.
Virtually ALL fiction tv shows have titles, whether they show up on screen or not.  It's how the screen writers' guild and others get paid.  They submit invoices referencing the title of the show they wrote, and that's what's on the check.  They can't use production numbers, because sometimes episode 2-13 is run before 2-10, or due to production problems, #3-2 can't be produced (possibly due to an accident or death of an actor, etc)  and so, the writer wants to get paid, and if the producer has commisisoned the script, and it was accomplished, there is a title (albet a working title) attached to the episode.
Henry R. Kujawa said:

"i have given most of them (arguably) better titles in my own mind. Now when it comes time to discuss them, I can never remember if the title I know them by is the official title or my own."

 

A pet peeve of mine is TV shows without episode titles, which then, later, online for example, have "official" titles.  In all cases where I've tapes such shows I've given them my own titles for reference, and I always prefer my own titles to supposed "official" ones.  (If they have actual titles, they should put them onscreen!)


All TV episodes have "official" titles; the practice of putting them onscreen, however, has long fallen out of favor.

 

Why? Beats me.

 

The various Star Trek shows were pretty good about putting the titles onscreen.

 

Some shows have a convention about title names. For example, nearly every Friends episode title began "The One With ..." or "The One Where ..." Nearly every Third Rock from the Sun title was a play on the word "Dick." For The Good Wife, each first-season episode had a one-word title; each second-season episode had a two-word title; each third-season episode has a three-word title. And so on.



ClarkKent_DC said:
Henry R. Kujawa said:

"i have given most of them (arguably) better titles in my own mind. Now when it comes time to discuss them, I can never remember if the title I know them by is the official title or my own."

 

 

A pet peeve of mine is TV shows without episode titles, which then, later, online for example, have "official" titles.  In all cases where I've tapes such shows I've given them my own titles for reference, and I always prefer my own titles to supposed "official" ones.  (If they have actual titles, they should put them onscreen!)


All TV episodes have "official" titles; the practice of putting them onscreen, however, has long fallen out of favor.

 

Why? Beats me.

 

The various Star Trek shows were pretty good about putting the titles onscreen.

 

Some shows have a convention about title names. For example, nearly every Friends episode title began "The One With ..." or "The One Where ..." Nearly every Third Rock from the Sun title was a play on the word "Dick." For The Good Wife, each first-season episode had a one-word title; each second-season episode had a two-word title; each third-season episode has a three-word title. And so on.

 

 

...Hnmm , if it reaches a GUNSMOKE/THE SIMPSONS-level run !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :-)

The Baron wrote:

"You make me think of the gag on Police Squad, where the title on-screen would be different from the title the voice-over man would announce."

 

You know what's crazy about that?  The narrator on POLICE SQUAD! was Marvin Miller... the voice of Robby The Robot!

 

It was pointed out online (and I really noticed it this last time I watched) that several episodes were run out of sequence.  Peter Lupus' introductory story was either the 2nd or 3rd one of his they aired-- and you could tell. (I think it's bizarre when they did the movies they replaced 2 of the regulars.  Lupus was replaced by O.J. Simpson, while Alan Gifford was replaced by George Kennedy.)

"Some shows have a convention about title names."

 

Yeah.  On THE WILD WILD WEST, every episode was "The Night Of..."  On THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E., every episode was "The.....Affair".  (This even included "The Say U.N.C.L.E. Affair" from 1986-- heh.)  On JAKE AND THE FATMAN, it was a bit more subtle-- every episode was named after a song from the 30's or 40's.

I'm pretty sure that the Naked Gun movies came before the Police Squad series was attempted, wasn't it?

Henry R. Kujawa said:

The Baron wrote:

"You make me think of the gag on Police Squad, where the title on-screen would be different from the title the voice-over man would announce."

 

You know what's crazy about that?  The narrator on POLICE SQUAD! was Marvin Miller... the voice of Robby The Robot!

 

It was pointed out online (and I really noticed it this last time I watched) that several episodes were run out of sequence.  Peter Lupus' introductory story was either the 2nd or 3rd one of his they aired-- and you could tell. (I think it's bizarre when they did the movies they replaced 2 of the regulars.  Lupus was replaced by O.J. Simpson, while Alan Gifford was replaced by George Kennedy.)

Kirk G said:
I'm pretty sure that the Naked Gun movies came before the Police Squad series was attempted, wasn't it?

No, the series was first. The series ran in 1982, and the first movie came six years later.
No, Police Squad came before The Naked Gun movies.
NAKED CITY preceded POLICE SQUAD.  But then, so did M SQUAD.  The POLICE SQUAD theme song is a parody of the M SQUAD theme, they're very similar.  And someone online pointed out that most of the characters from POLICE SQUAD were also based very closely on an old show from the late 50's-early 60's, but I'm not sure if it was M SQUAD or something else.

I watched KENTUCKY FRIED MOVIE, AIRPLANE! and all 6 POLICE SQUAD! episodes back-to-back recently, and I was surprised to find that POLICE SQUAD! was by a wide margin the LEAST funny.  Oh well.

Can you imagine if they'd gotten Robert Stack to star as Frank Drebin instead of Leslie Nielsen?  I bet it would have been SO much funnier.  (But then, I'd been writing a "crime comedy" series with a hero based on Robert Stack back in high school in the 70's!  Those early-70's syndicated reruns of THE UNTOUCHABLES really got to me.)
Speaking of TV episode naming conventions, all of Dragnet’s episodes began with “The Big…”: The Big Haul, The Big Con, the Big Speech, The Big Death, etc.

Speaking of TV Guide’s descriptions of Star Trek episodes, they were so bad at it that (by the time they were in syndication) I often wished they would have simply listed the title of the episode, on the theory that the majority of those watching them would know the titles, and anyone who didn’t wouldn’t have been watching (or wouldn’t have cared) anyway.

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