At the start of the 70s, the Super-titles consisted of Action Comics, Superman, Jimmy Olsen, Lois Lane, Superboy and Adventure Comics (starring Supergirl). These were all being edited by Mort Weisinger, except Superboy which he’d left in 1968. Weisinger was also editing World’s Finest. Superman also appeared in Justice League of America.

 

Weisinger left his titles in 1970, and they were handed to different editors. The styles used varied. Action Comics was given to Murray Boltinoff, and Superman to Julie Schwartz, but they used the same art team (Curt Swan and Murphy Anderson) and one of the same writers (Cary Bates). Before too long Schwartz took over Action. By the 80s Julie Schwartz was editing everything Superman-related except World’s Finest and Justice League of America.

 

Supergirl graduated into her own series, and Adventure ceased to be a Super-book for a while. Later Superboy’s feature was temporarily moved back there.

 

In 1974 Jimmy Olsen, Supergirl and Lois Lane were merged into Superman Family. Initially Jimmy, Lois and Supergirl alternated in the lead slot and were backed with reprints. Later the reprints were dropped and the title carried a mix of features. In 1982 the title was cancelled and Supergirl got a new title, The Daring New Adventures of Supergirl (later just Supergirl).

 

The Legion of Super-Heroes had been appearing in the back of Action, but lost its place there when Weisinger departed. In 1973 Superboy was converted into a Legion title. The comic’s official title eventually became Superboy and the Legion of Super-Heroes. In 1979 Superboy was dropped and the title became Legion of Super-Heroes.

 

Along the way the solo Superboy feature was revived for Adventure Comics, and then moved for a short period into Superman Family. In 1979 he got his own title, The New Adventures of Superboy.

 

When Weisinger left World’s Finest it was inherited by Schwartz and converted into a Superman team-up title. On Schwartz’s departure it became a Superman and Batman book again, although some of the stories were super-sons tales. Bob Haney wrote the Superman/Batman feature into 1979 and gave it its own distinct feel, although his writing is not to everyone's taste. After Haney left the title was more pedestrian.

 

In 1978 a new Superman team-up title, DC Comics Presents, was introduced. The title didn’t use a regular creative team, so all kinds of things appeared there.

 

Many of the Lois, Jimmy and Supergirl stories of the 70s and 80s have a second-team feel, although such writers as Cary Bates and Elliot S. Maggin also worked on them. I’m fond of the Leo Dorfman/Kurt Schaffenberger Jimmy Olsen stories from Jimmy Olsen and Superman Family, which depict Jimmy as very capable and have a light touch. After Superman Family's cancellation Lois appeared in back-ups in Supergirl's comic.

 

Some features spent some time as back-ups in Superman’s main titles and some time in Superman Family. Some of the "The Private Life of Clark Kent" and "The Fabulous World of Krypton" stories were very good. I like the "Mr. And Mrs. Superman" series, about the married Clark and Lois of Earth Two in the 50s. A very amusing Krypto series by Bob Toomey appeared in Superman Family. Superman Family also ran some decent Superman stories by Gerry Conway. The back-ups in the Super-titles of the 80s were often weak.

 

Beginning with World of Krypton in 1979 DC also published a few Superman mini-series. World of Krypton, about the adventures of Jor-El, wasn't very good, but The Krypton Chronicles, about the history of Krypton traced through Superman's family, has great charm. Steve Gerber and Gene Colan did a surreal and downbeat The Phantom Zone mini.

 

A post on what went on in Superman’s own feature to follow.

 

 

 

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The Rosses only appeared in "DC Comics Presents" #13 when the Legion tells Superman that Jon is destined to be a great leader of an alien world and he can't alter that, #14 where a grief-stricken Pete swaps minds with Superboy from the past and tries to kill Superman in front of his friends but Superboy in Pete's body gets (to him) the only help he can: Krypto and #25where Superman decides to bring Jon home with some guidance by the Phantom Stranger.
According to the paid circulation figures at Comichron, Weisinger's titles, including Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen and Adventure, were always among DC's top sellers in the 60s.(1) They form a cluster(2) at the top of the set of reporting DC titles, with World's Finest (before he took it over), Superboy (after he left it), Batman most years, and Detective Comics for one year during the Batman craze.

(1) Most DC titles didn't report in 1963/64, but I'd assume those years weren't exceptions.
(2) But with considerable sales spread between the titles, Superman averaging over 300,000 more issues than Adventure in some years.

(corrected)
Philip Portelli said:
The amazing thing is that DC had four flying white horses: The Shining Knight's Winged Victory, Comet the Super-Horse, Terra Man's Nova and the Wild Huntsman's Hurricane. Marvel had winged horses too. The criminal Black Knight's black steed which later got mutated into the Dreadknight's Hellhorse, the Avengers' Black Knight's winged white steed, Aragorn (based on the imagery of DC's Shining Knight) who later served the Valkyrie and the Black Knight's second winged horse, a black one named Valinor. Also Archie's Black Hood rode a flying robotic horse.

In Grant Morrison's Seven Soldiers of Victory, the winged horse of an earlier Shining Knight is called Vanguard. Morrison must have noticed all the winged horses in the DCU too, and revealed a whole city of them hidden away on some mountain top.
Some off-color (no pun intended) speculation about the Purple Piledriver: Do you think the character's name was intended as a dirty joke from the start, or did it just become one after publication?
It's intended as a joke - in his debut issue the real villain in Luthor - but whether an off-colour joke, I wouldn't know. His first appearance was written by Cary Bates.
Philip Portelli said:
The Rosses only appeared in "DC Comics Presents" #13 when the Legion tells Superman that Jon is destined to be a great leader of an alien world and he can't alter that, #14 where a grief-stricken Pete swaps minds with Superboy from the past and tries to kill Superman in front of his friends but Superboy in Pete's body gets (to him) the only help he can: Krypto and #25where Superman decides to bring Jon home with some guidance by the Phantom Stranger.

Huh, OK, I stand corrected. I didn't buy every issue of DCCP at the time, but I had all of those, which must have left me with a mistaken impression.

looks interesting

Bumping...........

Thanks, E.D. I'll shift this to the "In Depth" forum and finish the second part. It shouldn't take too long.

...Oh , heh , I didn't even know you hadn't finished it...........

  The question of how the Super-titles changed immediately post-Mort's mort ( in the office ) has interested me for a long time...Didn't they sort of split the editorship of LOIS LANE , effectively , between E. Nelson Bridwell and Robert Kanigher , with E.N.B. having the title and doing the office work ( I don't recall that ENB ever edited a non-reprint DC title in the sense that DC defined their " editors " then . ) and Kanigher really having more or the story-setting responsibility that editors had in DC's old " Editors has heads of their own little duchys " old corporate system ?????????

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