What I've got is the new releases with the enhanced special effects - I'll comment on these as best I can, shame I haven't got the originals to compare and contrast, but such is life. I put up the "spoiler" just on the off chance that there's someone here that hasn't seen all these a million times - you never know, I suppose.

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It has occurred to me over the years that the "Charlie X" episode was similar to the earlier Fantastic Four 24 story "The Infant Terrible". FF 24 was cover dated March 1964, so it was obviously sent to the printer in 1963 before any Star Trek episodes had even been filmed. The major differences are that the FF story concerned an obviously alien creature who turned out to be an infant and the ST story had a hormonal teen-ager who looked like a normal human. Both were unbeatable by the heroes until called home by their "parents."

Over the years, I found "The Squire Of Gothos" much more entertaining.

Or you could say that, like humans, no two vulcans are alike. Additionally, Spock is the only half-human vulcan I remember. It's possible that Spock, because of this, had a little more trouble hiding his emotions.

Jeff of Earth-J said:


Other actors who played Vulcans in later years would do well to assay Leonard Nimoy’s performance.

In the later series, though, the "unemotional" Vulcans were mostly surly instead of appearing unemotional.

Speaking of airing episodes of a series out of production sequence, the ill-fated TV show LAW AND ORDER: LOS ANGELES is the worst example I can think of. After it appeared that the series was headed for cancellation half-way through its first season they showed more exciting episodes where the co-lead was murdered and avenged. Following this, they showed several earlier episodes where the now-dead character goes about his normal business.

Richard Willis said:

Speaking of airing episodes of a series out of production sequence, the ill-fated TV show LAW AND ORDER: LOS ANGELES is the worst example I can think of. After it appeared that the series was headed for cancellation half-way through its first season they showed more exciting episodes where the co-lead was murdered and avenged. Following this, they showed several earlier episodes where the now-dead character goes about his normal business.

Perhaps that was a backdoor pilot for LAW AND ORDER: PURGATORY.

That concept of the infant being set loose or wrecking havok until the parents come to claim him, has been around for years and years.  There was a Challengers of the Unknown early episode featuring that, plus it shows up in some of the early Atlas Era Masterworks. (I can try to find the issue numbers if anyone is interested.)

Richard Willis said:

It has occurred to me over the years that the "Charlie X" episode was similar to the earlier Fantastic Four 24 story "The Infant Terrible". FF 24 was cover dated March 1964, so it was obviously sent to the printer in 1963 before any Star Trek episodes had even been filmed. The major differences are that the FF story concerned an obviously alien creature who turned out to be an infant and the ST story had a hormonal teen-ager who looked like a normal human. Both were unbeatable by the heroes until called home by their "parents."



PowerBook Pete, the Mad Mod said:

In the later series, though, the "unemotional" Vulcans were mostly surly instead of appearing unemotional.

On a seasonal note, did you know you can sing "Tuvok the Surly Vulcan" to the tune of "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer"?

I'll chime in from time to time, especially if you get to an episode I remember well. This may be blasphemy in these parts, but I have not seen all of them. Worse, the older I get, the less of a fan I am of the show. I don't think it's aged well. I can crawl into my mental W.A.B.A.C Machine and put myself in the frame of mind that I had when I was a kid and did like it (after all, doesn't everybody do that when they read Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen?), but it gets harder to put in that kind of effort. 

The things I find most grating about Star Trek is Dr. McCoy and his bigotry ("Spock, you inhuman, green-blooded half-breed!") which I never need to see and can't enjoy (likewise, I'm no fan of All in the Family, and the incessant praise of it for its alleged groundbreaking qualities just makes me ill), and how everybody was always nagging Spock about being human and showing his emotions, when it's really nobody's bloody business! If he fully wanted to embrace his Vulcanness, more power to him, I say, and I say everyone should have just left him alone. 

Amen, brother Clark...

A strange phenomena occured for me during the 90's.  The longer ST:TNG went on, the worse it seemed... while at the same time, the BETTER the original show seemed.  It got to the point where even the "bad" ones I could stand to watch more than the "good" ones of the spin-off.

Of course, if you're watching on commercial TV, with stuff cut, it can hurt, but many times the shows are so good they transcend the butcher jobs.  But see them UNCUT (and in my case, even with often-TERRIBLE recordings made over the antenna from a BAD signal) and they're glorious. (Except for the REALLY, REALLY bad ones, of course.)

Did you know the main villain of "Plato's Stepchildren" was in the pilot episode of THE MONKEES ?  (He played the father of the girl who falls for Davy.)

The Naked Time :

Written by John D. F. Black

Directed by Marc Daniels

 

Synopsis: Chemically-altered water makes everyone act all funny.

 

Thoughts:

1)I always thought the "environment suits" were goofy-looking.

 

2)Apparently, Starfleet doesn't train its members to keep their gloves on in possibly contaminated environments.

 

3)Dr. McCoy: Racist or Bigot?: McCoy gives Spock jib about his bio-readings and green blood.  Now, I must admit that when I watched this as a kid, I never thought of McCoy as a bigot. I just figured he was needling Spock - I've known guys who would say the vilest things to one another, but who were actually good friends. That was just their way of relating. You would see this when some outsider tried to give one of them a hard time and the other would spring to his defense.  That said, I'll be keeping a close watch as to just how often and how much McCoy (and the others) harass Spock.  It is interesting to note that Spock is the only non-human we ever see on the Enterprise (or, for that matter, in Starfleet) in the old series. I suppose a fun intellectual exercise would be to do this - take McCoy's remarks about Spock's green blood or pointed ears and imagine him saying them about Uhura's brown skin.

 

4)We get our first view of Nurse Chapel here, and it is revealed that she has the hots for Spock.

 

5)Bruce Hyde does a good job as Riley the obnoxious "drunk". "I'll take you home again, Kathleen"  Hmm, speaking of ethnic stereotypes...

 

6)I like how the others just watch while Riley and Sulu try to get the knife away from Joe.

 

7)We see McCoy operate for the first time here.

 

8)Ah, Shirtless Crazy Sulu...just awesome.

 

9)"Sulu, put that thing away."  Bet he's heard that more than once.

 

10)"I'll protect you, fair maiden." "Sorry, neither." Geez, race is all through this show...

 

11)We also see the first Vulcan neck pinch. Also that Spock has super-human strength.

 

12)I also like the laughing guy with the paint brush. He deserves his own spin-off.

 

13)"No dance tonight."

 

14)"I  can't change the laws of physics. I've got to have at least thirty minutes."  I once heard a dirty joke based on this line, but I'd better not print it here.

 

15)It's also clearly established here that Spock's mother is an Earthwoman, and that Spock has never been able to tell her that he loved her.

 

16)Kirk feels controlled by his ship - that it prevents him from having a normal relationship wih a woman, reflected in the way he looks longingly at Rand towards the end.

 

17)"Sinner repent".

 

18)In this episode, it's basically Scotty, McCoy and Uhura who keep the ship running - good thing none of them got infected.

 

19)"My chronometer's running backwards, sir."   I'm not sure I buy this as a means of time travel. Also not sure why it would make the clocks run backward. Shouldn't the crew be moving backwards, too, then?

 

Overall: Another pretty good episode. A good way of doing exposition of the crew's inner feelings.

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