What I've got is the new releases with the enhanced special effects - I'll comment on these as best I can, shame I haven't got the originals to compare and contrast, but such is life. I put up the "spoiler" just on the off chance that there's someone here that hasn't seen all these a million times - you never know, I suppose.

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"What Are Little Girls Made Of" is another favorite of mine. The costume designer should have won an Emmy for this one - Ted Cassidy's Roc costume makes him look even bigger and more intimidating than he was as Lurch and Sherry Jackson's costume that is barely there -Wow! I also like the ending with Corby phasing himself out of existence - heavy duty stuff for a prime time adventure show of that era- even if he was not quite human.

Who was it pulled the trigger, Corby or his pleasure-android?  I could never be sure.

It's like an even bleaker sci-fi take-off on the climax of I, THE JURY, when Mike Hammer winds up kissing the femme fatale he's just found out has been behind every single murder in the story.  A SHOT rings out.  She staggers back... HE fired first.  "How could you?" "IT WAS EASY."  (I wish I had a good copy of the Biff Elliot film... it's so much better than the one with Armand Assante.)

I just watched that scene again on DVD. The female android kisses Corby with her hand still on the trigger, but Corby purposely squeezes her hand so that it will fire, destroying hem both.

Henry R. Kujawa said:

Who was it pulled the trigger, Corby or his pleasure-android?  I could never be sure.

That's how I remember it also.

Richard Willis said:

I just watched that scene again on DVD. The female android kisses Corby with her hand still on the trigger, but Corby purposely squeezes her hand so that it will fire, destroying hem both.

Henry R. Kujawa said:

Who was it pulled the trigger, Corby or his pleasure-android?  I could never be sure.

Miri:

Written by Adrian Spies

Directed by Vincent McEveety

 

Synopsis:  The one with the the planet where little kids live for centuries, then die horribly when they hit puberty.

 

Thoughts:

1)"Another Earth" - Even when I was a little kid I had a hard time buying into these planets that somehow closely parallelled Earth in one way or another.  It always struck me as a way of visiitng "Planets we can use existing sets/costumes/props for".

 

2)I remember that the guy who freaks out over the tricycle really freaked me out when I was alittle kid. Now, not so much.

 

3)"Grups" - attempts at creating colloquialisms almost always sound goofy to me.

 

4)We see in this epsidoe that a gang of little kids can be scarier than any number of "monsters".

 

5)OK, Kirk, don't be hitting on little girls, that crosses the line. "James Tiberius Chickenhawk".

 

6)I meant to mention this before, but Farrell's an odd-looking cuss, isn't he?

 

7)Pretty careless for all of them to leave their communicators lying around.

 

8)"Bonk-bonk!"

 

9)"No blah-blah-blah!"  Worth the whole episode just to hear Shatner say that.

 

10)"I never get involved with older women, Yeoman."  Yuk-yuk-yuk.

 

11)I notice Gene L. Coon is listed as "producer" now, with Roddenberry bumped up to "Executive Producer".

 

Overall:

So-so episode. Not bad, I suppose, but not a particular favorite of mine.

 

I am with you on all of your points regarding "Miri". The most memorable aspect of this episode is the two young guest stars who would enjoy big screen fame a year or two after this episode aired - Michael J Pollard in Bonnie and Clyde and Kim Darby in True Grit.

When I saw this I thought Kirk's line about children needing parents an interesting, intelligent one.

Richard Willis:

"Corby purposely squeezes her hand so that it will fire, destroying hem both."

Maybe he finally realized the truth about himself and the rest of the androids.

Why, thank you!  I had no idea I was so interesting and intelligent!

Luke Blanchard said:

When I saw this I thought Kirk's line about children needing parents an interesting, intelligent one.

While some episodes in the 1st season were scary, or disturbing, I didn't HATE any of them with a vengeance and a passion... except for "MIRI".  It took me at least 15 years before I could even --just barely-- "appreciate" certain things about it.  But I never got to actually "like" it.

The story starts with the concept of a "parallel Earth", where the size of the planet and the shape of the continents are identical to Earth.  And then, NOTHING is done with it for the rest of the story.

As soon as they beam down, they run into HORROR-- yes, a group of wild, rampaging kids are scarier than monsters.  At least with monsters you feel like you can SHOOT 'em without feeling guilty.

And then, the whole plot veers off into left field with a terrifying "plague of the week" story.  Doctor shows were popular back then, did many of them tackle this kind of thing regularly, or even once in awhile?

Michael J. Pollard had already appeared in the previous season's LOST IN SPACE episode, "The Magic Mirror" (was that it?), and I hated him there.  But at least by the end, you felt the tiniest twinge of sympathy for him.  NOT HERE.  NO WAY.  I just wanted this "John" bastard KILLED!!!  45 years later, I still feel that way about his character.

Somewhere in the 70's (I think), I saw "TRUE GRIT" on TV.  Not sure I ever connected where I'd seen Kim Darby before.  Many years later, I saw Kim Darby in the film "BETTER OFF DEAD".  Never crossed my mind where I'd seen her before.  Many years after that, I saw her in "HALLOWEEN: THE CURSE OF MICHAEL MYERS".  Ditto what I said before.  Somewhere around 10-12 years back, I saw "TRUE GRIT" again-- this time on AMC (I think-- if so, it was when it was stioll a "real" movie channel, without commercial breaks).  And this time, I FELL IN LOVE watching her onscreen... in spite of how unlikable her character was.  I think the actress under the role must have come thru somehow.  Or maybe I just really do have a weakness for "women in distress".  About 5 years back, on TCM, I saw her in a MAN FROM UNCLE "movie" (they had an entire day running the movie versions of the 2-parters).  My GOD, was she CUTE back then!  They really had to go to extremes to make her unattractive in the STAR TREK appearance, didn't they?

Awhile back, I read about how Gene Roddenberry presented 3 scripts to NBC as possible 2nd pilots, after they turned down "The Cage" but unusually gave him the go-ahead to fine-tune the concept.  (Maybe they didn't want all that money they'd already spent on sets and props to go to waste.)  I've heard that when you do this, you often "stack the deck" in your favor, by coming up with 2 choices that are SO BAD the people you're dealing with will almost have to pick the "good" one which you want to do anyway.  This may explain why the other 2 choices, aside from "Where No Man Has Gone Before", were "Mudd's Women" and...  "The Omega Glory".  Now I kinda like "Mudd's Women".  But I have always HATED-- really HATED-- "The Omega Glory".  Except it's like a train wreck-- the kind you can't take your eyes off.  AAAAAAUGH!

And then it hit me...  parallel Earth, plague that can both kill AND allow people to live very, very long lives...  "Miri" must have started life as a REWRITE of "The Omega Glory"!!  Frankly, the "parallel Earth" with the identical continents would have made more sense in "The Omega Glory" (and probably was in there, before it in turn was re-written, when in desperation to finish the 2nd season and, running out of scripts, they dusted off the afore-mentioned "train-wreck" and fine-tuned it a bit.  Notice how "THE PRIME DIRECTIVE!!!!!" has such an overwhelming presence in that story?  In light of other "Prime Directive"-obsessed stories, wouldn't "The Omega Glory" almost have seemed like it could have / should have been the FIRST one?  I bet it's where the idea was first used, only they didn't film it at the time.  Hell, by the time they did film "The Omega Glory", they had already done multiple "Prime Directive" stories, AND multiple "parallel Earth" stories, so that the story that probably started both trends, when the finally did it, became a double-cleche!

By the way, speaking of "The Omega Glory", it cracked me up a couple months ago to see the actors who played "Ron Tracy" AND "Cloud William" as a pair of hired thugs in a TARZAN episode made the same year.

And in a completely random thought, isn't it a shame we never got a STAR TREK episode scored by Nelson Riddle ???  (He did the 2nd season of TARZAN.  I bet he was glad he missed BATMAN's 3rd season!)

Incredibly, LOST IN SPACE did a variation of this story the following year, as "The Promised Planet".  In that story, a group of teenagers are unable to grow old, and seek some kind of medical / scientific help to change their state.  (This is in between an unhealthy amount of go-go dancing.)

"The Omega Glory" is also the only episode I've always hated. I don't know how anything about it could be worse.

Henry R. Kujawa said:

But I have always HATED-- really HATED-- "The Omega Glory".  Except it's like a train wreck-- the kind you can't take your eyes off.  AAAAAAUGH!

Dagger of the Mind:

Written by S. Bar-David

Directed by VIncent McEveety

 

Synopsis: In which Inspector Luger has a brain-washing machine.

 

Thoughts:

1)I don't know that "Tantalus" is the best name for a penal colony.

 

2)The transporter chief seems kind of  chuckleheaded, not suspecting that there might be a forcefield around a prison planet.

 

3)Good to see James Gregory - who will always be Inspector Luger from Barney MIller to me - as Doctor Adams, initiating a character type we'll see again on this show - The Great Expert in His Field Who is Also Completely Nuts.

 

4)Speaking of "completely nuts", Morgan Woodward does a good job as Van Gelder, struggling to fight off his programming.

 

5)Interesting to see the tension between Kirk and McCoy here.

 

6)And, of course, Dr.Noel just happens to be a hottie who has a "history" with Kirk.  Nowadays, Kirk would've been done for sexual harassment by now.

 

7)Wee see here the first mind-meld, presented a little differently than it later would be.  Spock says he's never used it on a human before.

 

8)"I have no desire to damage my brain."  Dude! You don't know what you're missing!

 

Overall:

An OK episode - watching it last night, it occurred to me for the first time that we never really get any backstory on what Adams is up to - has he got a nefarious plan? Does he think he's serving a greater good but knows that society will disapprove? Does he jus tlike messing with people? Was he always nuts or did he just go over the edge at some point? A little more development of what he was up to wouldn' t have gone amiss.

 

 

 

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