What I've got is the new releases with the enhanced special effects - I'll comment on these as best I can, shame I haven't got the originals to compare and contrast, but such is life. I put up the "spoiler" just on the off chance that there's someone here that hasn't seen all these a million times - you never know, I suppose.

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Philip Portelli said:

Of course, that begs the question: Were there clergy on board the Enterprise (either one)? One would assume so but there was never mention of a Ship's Chaplain.

Well, it doesn't beg the question, Philip, but it certainly does raise it.

If the Star Trek universe were real life, then Federation spaceships certainly would have chaplains, or at least, religious advisors, assigned to them.  Simple human nature would make that follow.

 

As to why we never saw a chaplain on board Enterprise, that was probably a matter of practicality.  Not that many storylines could legitmately generate the involvement of a ship's chaplain.  And the functions of counsellor and advocate of the human condition, which a chaplain might fulfil, were attached to Doctor McCoy, who clearly filled a necessary function as ship's medical officer.  Therefore, out of budget considerations, there was no regular part for a chaplain.

 

As to why we never saw a chaplain---either a guest star or a bit player---on board the starship, the need for one probably never arose in the minds of those writing the scripts.  Of course, one was needed for "Balance of Terror" and "Data's Day", if one was to keep the wedding scenes accurate.  But here, the writers preferred to go with the Neat Idea, but erroneous belief, that ship's captains could perform marriages.

 

When it comes to the original series, there is another factor.  According to Mark Clark, in his book Star Trek FAQ (Applause Theatre & Cinema Books, 2012), Gene Roddenberry was ambivalent on the concept of religion and dismissive of the concept of God.  Per Clark's book, Roddenberry, while delivering a campus lecture, once stated, "We must question the story logic of having an all-knowing, all-powerful God, who creates faulty humans and them blames them for his own mistakes."

 

This attitude may have led Roddenberry, perhaps unconsciously, to overlook the matter of religion and the notion of a ship's chaplain.  (Though, from a dramaturgical standpoint, I can see opportunities for interpersonal drama between a chaplain with a devout belief in a supreme being and other main characters who might be more ambivalent about the concept.)

 

 

Commander Benson said:

NOTE:  it is possible that a ship's captain might also be an ordained clergyman; in which case, he could perform marriages, but that authority is not derived from his position as ship's captain.

 

What country's laws have jurisdiction? The one it's flagged for? The one whose waters it's in?

I seem to recall we touched briefly on this in the Gilligan's Island thread as well.

The Baron said:

Sure, because sound passes through water. I'm just questioning whether it would be necessary in space, is all.

Um, because the warm air released if they spoke would be detected by the Romulans via their monitoring of the Enterprise's thermal radiation patterns? Wait, I've got it. The Enterprise's systems include some voice-activated equipment. Presumably this goes on standby when not in use. If one speaks in its presence it goes active, like a computer that's been on standby when you hit the keyboard or move the mouse, in order to be ready to receive orders. So Kirk and co. have to keep quiet so the equipment will remain in standby mode instead of switching to active mode, which the Romulans would detect. But they can't disable the equipment because they'll need it when they counterattack.



Luke Blanchard said:

 

What country's laws have jurisdiction? The one it's flagged for? The one whose waters it's in?

It depends on the position of the ship. If it lies within the territorial waters of a nation, then the laws of that nation have jurisdiction. If the ship is on the high seas (i.e., outside of any territorial waters), then the nation under which the ship is registered and flagged has jurisdiction.

 

 

Thanks, Commander.



Luke Blanchard said:

The Baron said:

Sure, because sound passes through water. I'm just questioning whether it would be necessary in space, is all.

Um, because the warm air released if they spoke would be detected by the Romulans via their monitoring of the Enterprise's thermal radiation patterns? Wait, I've got it. The Enterprise's systems include some voice-activated equipment. Presumably this goes on standby when not in use. If one speaks in its presence it goes active, like a computer that's been on standby when you hit the keyboard or move the mouse, in order to be ready to receive orders. So Kirk and co. have to keep quiet so the equipment will remain in standby mode instead of switching to active mode, which the Romulans would detect. But they can't disable the equipment because they'll need it when they counterattack.

 

OK, I'm sold.

Shore Leave:

Written by Theodore Sturgeon

Directed by Robert Sparr

 

Synopsis: Our heroes visit a planet where everything they think of becomes real.

 

Thoughts:

1)I love McCoy's reaction to seeing the White Rabbit and Alice.  "SULU!"

 

2)Sulu has a gun collection.

 

3)Kirk encounters Finnegan, an upperclassman who used to pick on him at the Academy, as well as an old flame called Ruth, whom he hasn't sene in fifteen years.

 

4)Kirk fights Finnegan at the same set of rocks he later fights the Gorn at.

 

5)"The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play."

 

6)McCoy remembers a cabaret on Rigel II - busy place, the Rigel system.

 

7)Amusingly, the end of this episode is where the picture below comes form:


Overall:
Another entertaining episode, where we get to learn a little more about some of the characters.

 

 

 

It should be noted that "Shore Leave" was written by the great Science Fiction/Horror writer Theodore Sturgeon, who also wrote the original swamp monster story "It".

At the time I thought that Bruce Mars, who played Finnegan, would have made a much better Joker on the BATMAN show than Cesar Romero. According to Wikipedia, Mars also appeared as a crewman in "Corbomite Maneuver" and a policeman in the 1968 episode "Assignment: Earth".

A rare episode where McCoy gets the girl and we see that Southern Charm!

Kirk (looking at the giant rabbit-footprints): "It looks harmless. It probably is harmless. But before I bring my people down here, I want proof that it's harmless!"

Kirk: "You two follow the rabbit, I'll backtrack the girl." *YIKES!*

McCoy (as his new lady-friend changes clothes): "My dear, I only peek when I'm on duty."

 

Plus the tiger that appears is obviously chained up!

This is the episode that reverts back to stereotyping Sulu, when he reports being chased by a pair of Samuri warriors.

So much for progress...he succeeded in using a fencing foil... but when it came to a nightmare, they made him a racial stereotype again.  Sigh...

I don't see it that way, Kirk. It's more like Roddenberry saying as humanity progresses, it still holds its culture intact. It's no difference that Scotty or Chekov constantly bringing up their heritages. Sulu might be afraid of hostile samurais but who wouldn't be? Then again, he did confront Don Juan so it evens out.

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