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OUT OF THE SPEED FORCE AND INTO THE FIRE! TEAM FLASH MEETS NEW CHALLENGES (AND CHARACTERS) IN THE FLASH SEASON FOUR!

Cast and Producers Reveal New Characters at Saturday’s Comic-Con Panel

BURBANK, Calif. (July 22, 2017) — After three seasons of running, you’d think Barry Allen would deserve a break. He’s faced his evil-twin time remnant, saved his fiancée from the God of Speed and even sacrificed himself to stabilize the Speed Force. But now, in season four, Allen (aka The Flash) and his team will face new threats with the addition of some new characters, it was revealed at the 2017 Comic-Con panel for The Flash on Saturday, July 22. From the official reveal of next season’s big bad and more, the news had fans racing at a fever pitch.

Danny Trejo

Danny Trejo (Machete, From Dusk Till Dawn, Sons of Anarchy) has signed on to play the role of Breacher, a feared bounty hunter from Earth-19 and the imposing father to inter-dimensional bounty hunter, Gypsy (Jessica Camacho). His mission is to prevent any inter-dimensional traveler from threatening life on his planet — especially his daughter’s.

Neil Sandilands as The Thinker

Arriving in Central City as next season’s central super villain, Neil Sandilands (The 100, The Americans) will play DC villain Clifford Devoe, aka The Thinker, a metahuman with a mega mind who embarks on a season-long battle with The Flash that pits the “fastest man alive” against the “fastest mind alive.” A true genius, he’s devised an intricate plan to fix all that he deems wrong with humanity.

Kim Engelbrecht

Kim Engelbrecht (Dominion, Eye in the Sky) has been set as DC character The Mechanic, a highly intelligent engineer who designs devices for Devoe. As Devoe’s right hand, she’s the truest of true believers who’ll stop at nothing to help him implement his plan to fix humanity.

The Flash returns for season four on Tuesday, October 10, at 8/7c on The CW. Based on the DC characters, the series is executive produced by Greg Berlanti, Andrew Kreisberg, Todd Helbing and Sarah Schechter. The Flash is produced by Bonanza Productions in association with Berlanti Productions and Warner Bros. Television.

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From Entertainment Weekly's recap:

And then Barry receives a text, stands, and tells the judge that someone needs his help and he’s got to go. The judge blusters, but Cecile says there’s no law requiring Barry to be present for closing arguments. The judge warns Barry that he’s required to be back for sentencing. Soooo the judge assumes that Barry will be found guilty and require sentencing? I’m not a lawyer, but can you say mistrial?

Too bad District Attorney Cecile didn't catch that ... 

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

My favorite part of last night's Flash was to Ralph's speech to Joe as he was on the cusp of making a big mistake. It did my heart good to hear a hero taking a stand against shortcuts to justice.

That was very well done.

Seriously, Cecile really fell down on the job in Barry's defense. She couldn't question the chain of evidence, or anything?

ClarkKent_DC said:

From Entertainment Weekly's recap:

And then Barry receives a text, stands, and tells the judge that someone needs his help and he’s got to go. The judge blusters, but Cecile says there’s no law requiring Barry to be present for closing arguments. The judge warns Barry that he’s required to be back for sentencing. Soooo the judge assumes that Barry will be found guilty and require sentencing? I’m not a lawyer, but can you say mistrial?

Too bad District Attorney Cecile didn't catch that ... 

(And CK, in case you get a notification that your above post had been edited by a Mod, that was just dopey ol' me hitting "edit" on your post instead of "reply." I left everything as I found it, Scout's honor!)

CK said:

Wow. The comics "Trial of The Flash" dragged on for two miserable years. The story was, The Flash was slated to die in the Crisis on Infinite Earth series, which necessarily meant canceling the title. So writer Cary Bates proceeded to bore us all to tears with this drawn-out saga.

Oh, thank God I'm not the only one who was bored out of his mind by "Trial of the Flash"! I got to where I hated Cary Bates, Carmine Infantino, The Flash and the Earth they rode in on.

I know this isn't Law & Order, and you all know how much I like District Attorney Cecile, and I am not a lawyer (nor do I play one on TV), but ... Cecile "takes a leave of absence" to defend Barry? No. If Cecile is going to defend Barry, Cecile quits her job.

Agreed. I nearly dropped my adult beverage at the "leave of absence" nonsense. That is not how a prosecutor's office works.

Not that Cecile did that great a job defending Barry, although she was handicapped by an uncooperative client.

Agreed again. But I do have a question for Flash-o-philes out there. When they mentioned the prosecutor's name, it rang a bell. (Not the actor, who also played Christopher Chance a million years ago.) His name is "Anton Slater." And I think -- although I could be wrong -- that he was the prosecutor in the comic book "Trial of the Flash" back in the mid-1980s. I remember the younger Captain thinking "Anton" was a weird name choice, especially when nothing came of it. (I mean, "Anton" could be a Russian spy or a plant by Gorilla Grodd or something, but he wasn't.)

Then I realized: Wasn't Flash's defense attorney in the comics a woman named Cecile Horton? I didn't recognize that name on the show until now. 

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

Seriously, Cecile really fell down on the job in Barry's defense. She couldn't question the chain of evidence, or anything?

Or question how Clifford deVoe got in Barry's apartment without his wheelchair?

Or challenged the ridiculous notion that Barry being late a lot indicates he's a murderer?

Or make a better case that the wife's lover could have done it? A wife cheating on her paralyzed husband is a very plausible alternative theory of the crime, as they say on Law & Order. Even a jailhouse lawyer could have done more with those photos than Cecile did.

Captain Comics said:

Agreed again. But I do have a question for Flash-o-philes out there. When they mentioned the prosecutor's name, it rang a bell. (Not the actor, who also played Christopher Chance a million years ago.) His name is "Anton Slater." And I think -- although I could be wrong -- that he was the prosecutor in the comic book "Trial of the Flash" back in the mid-1980s. I remember the younger Captain thinking "Anton" was a weird name choice, especially when nothing came of it. (I mean, "Anton" could be a Russian spy or a plant by Gorilla Grodd or something, but he wasn't.)

Then I realized: Wasn't Flash's defense attorney in the comics a woman named Cecile Horton? I didn't recognize that name on the show until now. 

Right on both counts. And the Cecile Horton in the comics held a grudge against The Flash because he didn't stop Goldface from murdering her father. Not that she let this conflict of interest stop her from serving as The Flash's lawyer.

I know this isn't Law & Order, and you all know how much I like District Attorney Cecile, and I am not a lawyer (nor do I play one on TV), but ...

Cecile rested her case without putting on a defense. When you do that, you are making a statement that the other side has no case. You are saying that the prosecution has not met its burden of proof. To be able to do that, you better have challenged EVERYTHING the prosecution has offered, and shown that it doesn't hold up. You need to put up much more of a fight than we saw here.

Sure, they were up against a criminal genius mastermind. Sure, he put the frame very tight around Barry. But not airtight. Your best defense can't be "Barry's a really nice guy."

Bob Ingersoll almost made a second career out of punching holes in the comics "Trial of The Flash" story.* I imagine his reaction to this one would be something like this:   photo motocanaglia_testardo.gif

Ai yi yi yi yi ...

* I see someone out there has helpfully collected Ingersoll's columns on the subject, here: "Bob Ingersoll on 'The Trial of the Flash'"

I also found a site the did annotations of the "Trial of The Flash" stories. See here: "Speed Force: Flash Annotations"

Oh, man, thanks for those links!

I think the trial is indicative of the major problem with the CW superhero shows in general. They're singularly uninterested in how any part of the world that ISN'T superheroes works. It really is easier to believe dark matter gives people superpowers than to believe that Cecile couldn't have put up a better defense, or that Kara went from receptionist to CatCo's best reporter in an afternoon. (Or that a nationally known daily(!) magazine would even be called CatCo Magazine. What the hell kind of brand is that? Even if Cat is as big as Oprah, Oprah doesn't call her magazine Harpo Productions Magazine. She calls it O, which has elegance and class. CatCo Magazine sounds like it's similar to the coupon circular for Target stores.) 


I think someone -- maybe you, Rob -- has already mentioned that none of the writers on The CW knows how ANY job works. Right now on Supergirl, the publisher of CatCo (which is a dumb name) is canoodling with the EIC, over whom she is a supervisor. Uh, no. 

Not that he's very good EIC. Have you ever paid attention to what he says in the editorial meetings? It boils down to "I don't know how any of this works, so, uh, go do your jobs and don't screw up." That is a bad, bad boss.

Earlier in the season, a National City cop was dating an agent of a super-secret espionage organization, and breaking laws right and left right along with her.

Also, Cat, Jimmy and Lena all drink alcoholin the office. Even if you are the boss, even if it's usually after office hours, it's not 1950. That sets a bad example, not to mention jettisoning any respect you might hope to get from the rank and file. (Morgan Edge does, too, but he's a bad guy!)

I could go on, but what's the point? Melissa Benoist is awesome!

And what happened to Snapper? Was he fired? I missed something.

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

Oh, man, thanks for those links!

I think the trial is indicative of the major problem with the CW superhero shows in general. They're singularly uninterested in how any part of the world that ISN'T superheroes works. It really is easier to believe dark matter gives people superpowers than to believe that Cecile couldn't have put up a better defense, or that Kara went from receptionist to CatCo's best reporter in an afternoon. (Or that a nationally known daily(!) magazine would even be called CatCo Magazine. What the hell kind of brand is that? Even if Cat is as big as Oprah, Oprah doesn't call her magazine Harpo Productions Magazine. She calls it O, which has elegance and class. CatCo Magazine sounds like it's similar to the coupon circular for Target stores.) 


I don't think we've been given any word about Snapper -- hopefully he's still around somewhere at CatCo, because I love that actor, and I thought he did a great job. 

(And yeah, that was me complaining about jobs on the CW shows.)

The one place I'll differ with you is alcohol in the office. At a number of the magazines in NYC I've worked at -- Outdoor Life, Bon Appetit -- there was alcohol around. Generally just for special occasions (and sometimes summer Fridays), but with a big enough magazine where someone is always moving on to a new job, there are plenty of goodbye toasts at the end of the day, etc. On Facebook, whenever this was happening and I found myself drinking at work, I'd post "Ah, publishing!" -- and I posted it a LOT. Strangely enough, when I worked at the Village Voice, there wasn't nearly as much alcohol in the office -- and given its antiestablishment reputation, you might think it would be more freewheeling in that regard. I think I had a glass of whiskey one night during a particularly onerous close, but that was it. Maybe that's a difference between newspaper and magazine culture; maybe it's that big glossy magazine companies just have a bigger budget for discretionary expenditures than newspapers.  

Anyway, the drinking at the office bit doesn't strike me as unusual as it does for you. And regardless, I'm with you 100% that Jimmy and Lena are bad bosses. I'm just not sure that the drinking is proof in that regard. (Although their never sharing a toast with all the 9-to-5ers doesn't earn them any points in my book.) 

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