This is meant to be a one-stop shop for discussing the works of Grant Morrison. There’s just a few things I wanted to try on a new thread, as well as bring everything under the one roof. This isn’t a complete list, but I’m hoping to add other stuff as we get to them. (Click on the hyper-links to go to discussions of the different books.) Let’s see how many of these stories we can get through…

 

1985-88 Secret Origins

Captain Granbretan - text story Captain Britain #13 (January 1986, Marvel UK),

• "The Stalking" (text story with illustrations by Garry Leach, UK 1986 Batman Annual)

• "Osgood Peabody's Big Green Dream Machine" (text story with illustrations by Barry Kitson and Jeff Anderson, UK Superman Annual, 1986)

Zoids Marvel UK - March 1986 - February 1987 Part 1 Part 2

• Dr Who Magazine Marvel UK - Changes (issue #118-9), The World Shapers (#127-9), Shock! (#139)

 

1988-90 Animal Patrol

St Swithin's Day  (with Paul Grist) Trident 1989

JLA: Ghosts of Stone Secret Origins #46

Arkham Asylum 1989 (See attachment below)

Animal Man (DC, #1-26, 1988-1990): Vol 1, Vol 2, Vol 3.

Doom Patrol (DC, #19-63, 1989-1993): Vol 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

• "Flash of Two Worlds" (Secret Origins #50, 1990)

Gothic (with Klaus Janson, in Legends of the Dark Knight #6-10) 1990 (Also, see attachment)

• Hellblazer: "Early Warning" #25-26, Vertigo, 1990.

 

1991-94 Odds and Sods

Kid Eternity, with Duncan Fegredo, DC, 3-issue mini-series, 1991

Sebastian O with Steve Yeowell, Vertigo, 3-issue mini-series, 1993

• The Mystery Play with Jon J. Muth, Vertigo, graphic novel, 1994

• Swamp Thing: "Bad Gumbo" (with co-writer Mark Millar and artist Philip Hester,) Vertigo, #140-143, 1994

 

1994-2000 JLInvisible

The Invisibles (Vertigo, 1994-2000): Vol I, Vol II, Vol III.

• Skrull Kill Krew (with co-writer Mark Millar) Marvel, 5 issues, 1995

Kill Your Boyfriend (with Philip Bond and D'Israeli, Vertigo) 1995

• Flex Mentallo (with Frank Quitely) Vertigo 1996

New Toys from Weird War Tales #3 (with Frank Quitely, Vertigo), 1997

 

Aztek, the Ultimate Man #1-10 (with co-writer Mark Millar) 1996

• The Flash: (with co-writer Mark Millar), Emergency Stop / The Human Race 1997

JLA 1997-2000

JLA/WildC.A.T.s one-shot crossover, 1997

DC One Million, 1998 Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Interlude, Week 4, Week 5, Epilogue I, Epilogue II

JLA: Earth 2, 1999

 

2000 - 2004 Marvellous Filth

• Marvel Boy, 6 issues Marvel 2000

• Fantastic Four: 1234 (Marvel Knights) 2001-2

New X-men, #114-156, Marvel, July 2001 - June 2004  Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

The Filth, Vertigo, 13-issues, 2002

 

2004 – 2013

• WE3 (with Frank Quitely, Vertigo, 3-issue mini-series, 2004

• Seaguy, Vertigo Book 1 2004, Book 2 2009

• Vimanarama (with Philip Bond) Vertigo 3-issue mini-series 2005

Joe the Barbarian, DC 8-issue series. 2009

 

• DC Comics Presents: Mystery in Space (tribute to Julie Scwartz) 2004

All Star Superman, 12 issues, 2005 - 2008

 

The Infinite Book

JLA: Ultramarine Corps JLA Classified #1-3 (with Ed McGuiness) DC 2004 (+ dedicated thread here)

Seven Soldiers 2005 -6 (+ dedicated thread here)

• 52 (with co-authors Geoff Johns, Greg Rucka, and Mark Waid), DC, #1-52, 2006-2007

Batman & Son (includes issues from #655-666), 2006-07

The Club of Heroes Batman #667-669, 2007

The Resurrection of Ra's al Ghul with var writers, inc Batman #670-671, Oct-Nov 2007

• The Black Glove Batman #672-675, 2007-08

Batman R.I.P., Batman #676-681, 2008

• Batman RIP - The Missing Chapter 2010 Part 1 Batman #701 (also here)

Final Crisis, May 2008-January 2009

Batman and Robin, June 2009 onwards

• Batman 700 2010

Return of Bruce Wayne 2010

 

2012 - End of the world!

 

2013 Beyond Batman

 

Happy (with Darrick Robertson), Image, 4-issue mini-series, 2012-13

 

(682 - 20/03/12)

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I like the way you've sorted things out here, Figs! Well done!
"Osgood Peabody's Big Green Dream Machine"

(text story with illustrations by Barry Kitson and Jeff Anderson, in the UK Superman Annual, 1986)

Morrison’s first semi-official Superman story. Like The Stalking, above, this would have been published in late 1985, in time for the Christmas market, in the hope of inclusion in Santa’s goody-stashes across the land on Christmas morning. You’re encouraged to read it first at the fish1000 link above. In the best Silver Age tradition there’s a little puzzle in it that you should see try to work out yourself before the end.

...


This playful little Superman tale rounds out our look at Morrison’s earliest work for the ‘Big 2’. Like the Batman story above, it’s a shaggy dog story*, but of a different kind.

Instead of a marquee villain, we have a newly minted meeting of “representatives of the world’s major crime syndicates.” Gatherings like this are common in superhero stories, and it’s easy to see how far Morrison has come by comparing this criminal get-together with a recent one in Batman and Robin. There, we had a meeting of Gotham’s underworld headed by a bizarre Catholic-themed Klan-hooded ganglord called El Penitente. I still grin at the thought that the DCU was graced with such a far-out ‘businessman’, if only for a short time.

In this 1985 story, we get a one-dimensional businessman-gangster type called Goodman, and a few Italian stereo-types, even down to talking-a like-a these-a!

I wonder was the main villain consciously or subconsciously named after the founding father of Marvel Comics – Martin Goodman?

Osgood Peabody himself is an early example of the kind of socially incompetent super-brain that Morrison would write so entertainingly in 52. He gets some good lines here. A single monosyllabic “Yes” being quite funny at one point.

As light as the story is, it does visit themes that would recur again and again in his work: identity, reality, the subconscious, dreaming, and sympathy with animals being some of them.

Like the Batman story, this one portrays the pre-Crisis hero and his world. This Superman is almost godlike in his powers compared to Byrne’s re-booted model. Given the date of publication, Crisis on Infinite Earths had already started being published and there would only be another 12 months or so of the classic pre-Crisis Superman before Alan Moore would bring this much-loved iteration to a close.

As someone who would go on to make quite a mark on both these heroes, it’s good that Morrison got these little shots at writing them in their ‘classic’ mode.

However, at bottom, these are stories which happen to feature Superman and Batman, respectively. It would take many more years of mulling over these iconic 20th century legends before Morrison would start producing stories which were about what it must be like to be these particular heroes and about the unique qualities that make them each tick!

What’s interesting is that the DC stories, as a pair, are the diametric opposite of the Granbretan story. They are playful, respectful of Silver Age elements, and evince a delight in working with these much-loved properties. The spin-off of Moore’s Captain Britain, however, was cynical, morbid and of the ‘deconstruction’ school in how it used ‘psychological realism’ to show that superheroes are bound to fail in their missions.

Morrison was lucky to get these little narrative ‘sketches’ published at all, so of course its probably not wise to make any great statements about his superhero work from them. If only the Marvel or only the DC work had been published, no doubt I would be sitting here giving my armchair analysis about how one or the other represented his true calling. Taken all together though, they do display a great flexibility of approach. The humour and riddling of the DC stories show a playfulness inside the box of traditional superheroics, and the cynicism of the Marvel story shows an ability to take the superhero well outside that box.

*(heh, heh!)
JeffCarter said:
I like the way you've sorted things out here, Figs! Well done!

Cheers, man.

Photobucket

Where ya been?

(It looks good maybe, but I've hit a slight snag. This is very much a work in progress. Back to the drawing board!)
I read the first four issues of The Filth over the weekend. So let's get this party started! Wikipedia has a wonderfully detailed plot summary, so here's the story so far:

Greg Feely is a "dodgy bachelor" living in London alone but for his cat. While returning home after buying cat litter and a pornographic magazine from a newsagents, he starts to hear voices telling him "not to fuck with The Filth". The next day at work he is told "The Hand never lets go" by an unknown woman. Returning home he is confronted by a strange woman named Miami who informs him that "Greg Feely" is actually a 'para-personality', in effect a secret identity, and he is in fact Ned Slade, the top agent for an organisation called The Hand, a group of extra dimensional agents attempting to keep society on the path to 'Status Q' (status quo).[1]

After telling his 'replacement' to take care of the cat, Slade and Miami travel to The Hand's headquarters. Slade is told by his superior officer, the enigmatic Mother Dirt, that he has been brought back to help maintain 'Status Q', and to ensure that Slade's friend and former agent Spartacus Hughes fails in his attempts to disrupt the 'Status Q'. Slade sets out to stop Hughes from helping a perverted billionaire control a new form of life called I-Life (created to become a new immune system for humans). With the aid of Miami and Comrade Dmitri-9, a Russian chimpanzee assassin, Slade confronts Hughes and manages to distract him so that Dmitri-9 can shoot him.

Slade returns to The Hand headquarters to find answers to what is going on. Receiving no answers, Slade quits to be Greg Feely again and take care of his sick cat. The Hand sends Dimitri-9 to bring Feely/Slade back. After telling Feely's replacement to make sure he cares for Feely's sick cat, Slade meets Doctor Arno Von Vermin, another officer of The Hand. They travel to another dimension where their vehicle crashes, forcing them to walk across a bizarre landscape to find a way to Hand headquarters. Slade discovers Von Vermin to be an 'anti-person': one who can endanger the Status Q. Slade leaves Von Vermin to die and sets out to reach Hand headquarters on foot.


First, the title. It is British slang for the police, as well as a reference to the pornography that is a central element in the story. The first issue opens with a police beating and murder (which we find out more about later in the issue) and Greg Feely buying candy, kitty litter, and porn magazines (including one titled "The Filth"). Feely suddenly has his Officer Slade identity revealed to him and has to suit up and travel to the Hand headquarters. That's a lot of information for a first issue. I was nearly as disoriented as Feely (or should I call him Slade? He's unsure of his "real" identity, and so is the reader).

There are parallels with The Invisibles. This story also features an inter-dimensional agency secretly maintaining the reality we know. But this one is a force for enforcing "normality," rather than freedom (or anarchy). Billionaire Simon is like an evil twin to Mason Lang. There's some prime Morrisonian breaking of the fourth wall in the third issue, which presents runaway superheroes escaping the confines of their comic book panels. Turns out that comic book continuity is actually maintained by The Hand.

That's all I can manage for now. Discuss!
Gah! I'm on holiday and although I brought 7-8 TPbs worth of comics with me, The Filth wasn't one of them. Looking forward to rereading it, but it'll have to wait til after Monday!

I know I had plenty of heads up and all, but there was a lot of stuff to get in the car, and so little time, and...

(What's truly tragic is that I did bring X-men Decimation and The Sinestro Corps War vol II. I am filled with shame!)
Thirty lashes, Figs! I hope you won't feel compelled to do a detailed issue by issue commentary, because I expect to read another four issues this weekend and do a similar posting on them. I really don't see the same degree of information density as The Invisibles, for the most part, but you may disagree.
On to Issues 5 - 6 of The Filth, which comprise the next mini-story arc. Wikipedia again:

Slade's next mission involves Anders Klimakks, a porn star who is found by Los Angeles police wandering naked with a bag containing fifty pornographic magazines and DVDs. The police call in The Hand to question Klimakks. Klimakks reveals to Hand Officer Jones that he began life as a porn star in his native Amsterdam before coming to Los Angeles to work for pornographer Tex Porneau (based upon real life porn director Max Hardcore[4]). Porneau is after his semen, which is strangely jet-black. After being seduced by Klimakks, Jones informs Hand headquarters that Klimakks is an anti-person. Slade and his team are called in to investigate, just as Porneau is transforming his latest batch of prisoners into rubber-clad servants. Upon arriving, Slade is confronted with the giant mutant sperm which Porneau has created as a weapon to kill any woman with a fertile womb. Slade's team manage to stop Porneau but not before hundreds are killed. Klimakks is killed for being an anti-person, but he lives on in the children of the 824 women he had sex with.

This is the most hardcore arc yet, if you'll pardon the pun. The pornography subtext in the series is blatantly front and center, and the enormous sperm (which could easily be played for humor) are presented as a serious threat to human life. There's a lot of action (of all sorts), which comes to a climax (sorry, I just can't stop myself) with Tex Porneau turned into the target of his own evil plan. The bit about Anders Kimakks's mutant offspring is a gentle, odd postscript.
A couple things I meant to mention. This is the first arc that does not involve a rogue Hand agent. The first two both did, something I don't remember noticing when I first read it. And Figs, what do you think of the Scots accent Morrison gives to Officer Spector? I'm wondering if there's something specific he meant to reference.
Ah, The Filth.

Sorry for the late arrival. I just got back from my holidays yesterday and I’ve read up to issue 4 so far.

I should just copy and paste the following paragraph for all my Morrison posts, but here goes:

Reading this in monthly format it all seemed very disjointed and hard to make sense of. I think I read the first 10 issues like that. Then I read the collected edition a few years ago, and it hung together a bit better. But reading it now, it doesn’t seem so impenetrable.

The Spartacus Hughes scenes don’t seem to have any connection to the main narrative in the first issue, but there’s nothing in the first issue that isn’t cleared up by the end of the 2nd issue. Having read to the end of issue 4, I’m quite surprised that The Filth is reading like an episodic TV series, whereas I was expecting it to feel more like a novel. There doesn’t seem to be any connection between Spartacus Hughes, The Original Secret, Arno Von Vermun and Anders Klimakks, beyond their connection to the Hand.

On the level of a sci-fi sort of cop story, The Filth is easy enough to follow, but it does pose a few questions when we start to look at how Morrison is telling this story.

I enjoyed the Patient Product Information at the beginning of the collected edition. Much of it is just funny, but it’s worth repeating the part where Morrison lays out what he is doing:

The Filth contains the active ingredient metaphor

Metaphor is one of a group of problem-solving medicines known as figures of speech which are normally used to treat literal thinking and other diseases. Metaphor combines two or more seemingly unrelated concepts in a way that stimulates lateral thought processes and creativity. Patients using the Filth are required to participate in the generation of significant content by interpreting text and images which have been deliberately loaded with multiple overlapping meanings and scales.


For quite a while now Morrison has been overly sensitive to accusations of obscurity and difficulty in his work. Consequently, in interviews and his own explanations of his work, he tends to over-explain everything about what he is doing. For my part I will have to start avoiding his interviews which tend to spoil his works months before they even appear in print.

It’s kind of a pity that an entertaining writer like Morrison has to include a defence of his writing style in the book itself, as he does in this tongue-in-cheek introduction. But it is where he has combined ‘two or more seemingly unrelated concepts in a way that stimulates lateral thought processes and creativity’ that The Filth seems most interesting to me, beyond the sci-fi plotting.

Part of the first issue shows us almost 24 hours in the life of neighbourhood ‘creepy bachelor’ Greg Feely. We first meet him at 5.26 PM and at about that exact time the next evening, the ordinariness of his world collapses around him when Jones steps out of his shower with her bizarre comb-over. A lot of his journey home on the first evening is shown through a series of surveillance cameras. Narratively, this sequence just shows us the downbeat ordinariness of Greg’s life, but ordinary comic frames could have shown this. What’s being said with all the camera views?

Outside the comic itself, the UK does have the most cameras per people of any country in the western world. The Invisibles reflected variously on this, from the consolation that the people manning the cameras were only human and couldn’t pay too much attention for long, to the fun idea that people living their whole life in the camera lens would eventually start acting like their life is a Hollywood movie.

We see in a later issue that a section of the Hand is involved in surveillance, but that still doesn’t quite explain why we get the whole sequence of Greg going home on camera.

A lot of story elements are similarly difficult for us to see what their connection to the overall themes might be. Dmitri-9 the anachronistic Marxist cosmonaut pot-smoking super-assassin chimp is one. Why is he any of those things? Why all of them together? Admittedly he is a great creation and often funny when not being downright scary, but it’s hard not to try to figure out what he ‘means’ in relation to the rest of the story.

Moving on to issue three and more puzzles. The Secret Original, with his kiss-curl slipping out between his bandages, is a Superman analogue. It’s verging on bad taste that, as such, he seems to be severely disabled and in a wheelchair. So for some reason we are being made to think of the late Christopher Reeve as well as the comicbook Superman. The sequence where the Hand agents in their ink-suits go on a ‘murder-spree’ in the comicbook world is good fun, but the ideas are by now very familiar to fans of Morrison. The superheroes begin to perceive that their fate is in the hands of cruel and capricious ‘gods’, as Animal Man and Crafty Coyote did before them.

Mark, I hadn’t thought about it until you mentioned it, but Cameron and the other guy did seem to be Hand agents. So the creation and regulation of comicbooks is done by the same people who regulate and clean up the mountains of pornography that society produces as well as all the other unsavoury aspects of the human condition that society pretends don’t exist. That’s a telling comment on superhero universes!

Yes, that is a strong Scottish accent that Cameron displays. It only makes sense when you say her dialogue aloud. ‘Cameron’ itself is an emphatically Scottish name. It used to be a girl's name, but is now almost exclusively a boys name, so Cameron might be this character’s surname, like the film director. Cameron Stewart is a Scottish collaborator of Morrison’s, but they didn’t work together until Seaguy, a year or two later. Actually, Scotland has produced quite a lot of comics talent. One of the handful of comics companies in the UK, and possibly the most successful is DC Thomson, based in Dundee, Scotland. As well as Millar and Morrison, Alan Grant and John Wagner, who wrote the golden age of Judge Dredd stories in 2000AD are Scottish. So the Scottishness of this voyager in the comics realm might be Morrison’s way of highlighting Scotland’s contribution to the world of sequential images.

Thematically, the Secret Original and Greg Feely share an addiction to pornography, which keeps them constrained in their respective worlds, and it either stops them achieving the heroic life they might have or it provides a consoling shield from the horrors of their ‘heroic life’, depending on how you look at it.

As you say, Mark, pornography is somehow very central to much of what goes on in The Filth. For one thing, it’s one more secret the Secret Original has to keep from everyone in his new broken existence. It’s somehow inseparable from the wealth that Simon has access to. The Hand seem to be headquartered in a zone of pure metaphor, surrounded by literally mountains of pornography. It reminded me of claims that the internet superhighway is jammed with about 90% porn.

Which if it is true is kind of funny, but an incredible statistic as an indication of what most internet users home in on when they think no-one is watching. So much of our everyday reality tries to maintain the fiction that ‘normality’ prevails and ‘most of us’ don’t give much time to all kinds of unacceptable thoughts. I think this is the central realisation that The Filth is based around. Then, as you point out, the Filth is slang for the Police in the UK. Like the Hand and their succession of rogue agents, constant exposure to the sleazy side of human nature has contaminated them to such an extent that a nickname like that becomes common parlance.

Of course, in his Disinfo speech I linked to in the Invisibles thread, Morrison cites the Police especially as the group that the counterculture ‘others’. He explains that they are hated because we empowered them to deal with aspects of society that we don’t want to face ourselves. Partially they do become corrupted by the world they move in, but partially, the Police and what they are supposed to protect us from become identified in our minds. The illogicality of this thinking is very human.

Morrison of course isn’t interested in simple ‘Us and Them’ polarities. The Filth is a post-Invisibles work where the forces of control and ‘normalcy’ are shown with some sympathy. They ARE us! Given that so much of what it means to be human is swamped by stuff we’d rather not think about - forbidden desires, sex, germs and disease, aging, death - the Hand have a heroically Herculean task in maintaining the 'Status Q'.
Figs said:

The Spartacus Hughes scenes don’t seem to have any connection to the main narrative in the first issue, but there’s nothing in the first issue that isn’t cleared up by the end of the 2nd issue. Having read to the end of issue 4, I’m quite surprised that The Filth is reading like an episodic TV series, whereas I was expecting it to feel more like a novel. There doesn’t seem to be any connection between Spartacus Hughes, The Original Secret, Arno Von Vermun and Anders Klimakks, beyond their connection to the Hand.

On the level of a sci-fi sort of cop story, The Filth is easy enough to follow, but it does pose a few questions when we start to look at how Morrison is telling this story.

That's how it feels to me, too. I remember it being this bizarre, hard-to-follow creation, but it now seems pretty straightforward to me. The first issue was quite disorienting, but everything makes sense by the time you've finished the second. And after that, there's a new “case” every two issues, at least through issue #8 where I just stopped. So far there has been no apparent connection between the cases, other than the recurrence of Spartacus Hughes in issues #7 – 8 (more on that later).

Figs again:

A lot of story elements are similarly difficult for us to see what their connection to the overall themes might be. Dmitri-9 the anachronistic Marxist cosmonaut pot-smoking super-assassin chimp is one. Why is he any of those things? Why all of them together? Admittedly he is a great creation and often funny when not being downright scary, but it’s hard not to try to figure out what he ‘means’ in relation to the rest of the story.

Yep, I completely agree. The chimp is a great character invention, but what does it mean? The only thing I can offer is that he provides a true outsider perspective: he's part of this human cleanup force, but he's not even human. He's always talking about what a disgusting lot humans are.
I also read issues # 7 - 8 over the weekend, so while the memory is still fresh, here's the Wikipedia summary again (with a few spelling corrections):

Slade returns to being Greg Feely just in time to find his cat Tony's health has worsened. Before he can call the vet, he is arrested by the police who suspect him of being a pedophile due to pictures found in his garbage. Slade denies he is a pedophile, saying that the pictures are just experiments with Photoshop. Slade/Feely escapes after injuring his police interrogators. While escaping the police Slade/Feely finds a tampon in a puddle with the words "help us" written in blood on it. After being arrested again Slade's team from The Hand appears and tell the police to release him. His team informs him that Spartacus Hughes has declared war on the U.S. after kidnapping the President who is on board a gigantic city ship called the Libertania. Slade and his team board the ship and find that Hughes has turned the innocent passengers on "Libertania" into violent anti-people who destroy their ship for Hughes's amusement. Slade confronts Hughes and while being told by Hughes that he decided to become an anti-person after seeing "too much dirt" during his days with The Hand, the President and Hughes are killed by Dmitri-9.

Spartacus Hughes reappears here, despite being killed back in the first arc. It's explained that Dmitri only killed a "carrier:" the concept was mentioned during the Anders Klimakks arc also. Someone says that Officer Jones was too good an officer to let die, and Slade remembers what a carrier is. The term implies that human consciousness is like a bacteria or virus that infects the host body, so it can be transferred from one body to another. More on this later, I expect.

Hughes says that the group consciousness created on the ship is the next evolutionary step for humanity, but the Hand disagrees. While some of the other arcs have involved obviously dangerous threats, this one is a bit more subtle. Does the Filth oppose any change in the status quo? Then human evolution would be impossible, assuming the Filth is on the job.
Mark said:

He's always talking about what a disgusting lot humans are.

"One less Human scum!" - Dmitri's brilliant!

Often I only start to make sense of things while writing these screeds, which is why they are sometimes long and full of questions. I realise now that anachronistic is the key word. Marxism, cosmonauts, pot-smoking as a fashion statement: they are all of the past, just as chimps are seen to be lower on the evolutionary scale to us Sapiens Sapiens. (Even though they aren't, technically)

He still clings to the old 1950s Soviet jargon and worldview. "Kill for Khruschev" and "Stupid, Imperialist Bouffant". Does someone say Morrison's mantra "Evolve or die" in the book? He is a living example of someone who doesn't.

The chimp doesn't seem to be as reconciled to the filthy aspects of their job either. He uses the language of shit and scum and filth and body parts very perjoratively (and to great comic effect). The other members of the Hand make less of a big deal about the things that society usually covers up and tries to ignore. In that way too, they are more evolved than him. They see that these 'unacceptable' aspects of hamanity are a huge part of who we are. (Think of modern cities - how much of their energy, ingenuity and resources go towards dragging and pumping sewage and waste out of sight and out of mind? The sewers alone are like a vast, dark mirror image of the city above.)

For someone who hates humans so much - probably with good reason - Dmitri has landed the perfect job. Killing human scum. There should be a place for everyone, no matter how beyond the pale their personalities are.

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