Rendezvous With Yesterday:

I haven't seen these in about 40 years, so, effectively, I'm seeing them as for the first time.

Yeah, even if his name wasn't on it, you'd guess this was an Irwin Allen show about a minute into it.

This is such a 60's show. I miss shows like that.

Whit Bissell as the General. Always good to see our Whit.

Cripes, they've got Altair IV down there! And they're gonna shut this huge place down, just because one senator says so?

I'd forgotten that Tony went back alone first.

Fun facts: Anthony Newman was born in 1938, and is from the year 1968. so, the show was set two years in what was then the future.

Andrew was right - Newman immediately tries to change history. "We're Americans, by God! None of this 'worrying about damaging the web of time' for us!"

The great Michael Rennie as the Captain of the Titanic.

And, they end up on a rocket....

Music by "Johnny" Williams.

Well, the special effects are alot better than Doctor Who of the same time period, and they haven't aged too badly.

Interesting that out of all of human history, they land someplace historically significant on their first try.

All in all, I enjoyed this alot. The disk set has an unaired expanded version of the pilot, I shall take a look at that next, to see what they left out of the aired version. Doug and Tony seem like reasonably likable 60's Americans TV heroes so far.

One wonders what the plan was for using the time tunnel once it was perfected - historical and archaeological research, of course - and perhaps a little judicious nudging of world history into directions more favorable to the USA? Hmmm?

Views: 833

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Yeah, I wondered about the original scouts, too - they just seem to have vanished.
"General Kirk, while he sees the logic in Southall's argument, really doesn't want to do it."

"I don’t see the logic, really. The American’s won that battle due to Pakenham’s mistake. If Southall’s actions in the past should cause America to lose, wouldn’t it be treasonous to send him back in the first place?"


Not at all. The United States had already won the War of 1812---the Treaty of Ghent had been signed on 24 December 1814, so the upcoming battle, which the show stipulated was set for 07 January 1815, would have no effect on that, no matter how it turned out.

As for the battle specifically, the fictional conceit of the show had already established that history was immutable. In fact, part of the exchange between Generals Southall and Kirk, it is argued that the result of the battle---that the British lost, due to what was thought then to be a cold-blooded decision by Colonel Southall to attack the Americans' strongest flank, was already recorded by history. Southall says something to the effect that he knows he can't change the results of the battle; he just wants to find out why his ancestor made the decision he did. Furthermore, General Southall points out, he will be able to help Phillips and Newman. After all, says Southall, most likely history did not record what happened to two American spies dressed like scouts (implying that it might not change history to rescue Doug and Tony).

I find that eminently logical. I took General Kirk's reticence as simply being reluctant to send an old friend into the tunnel when there was no chance of bringing him home.


"Once again, we see the "clothing shift" at the end of the episode. And here, just like in 'Revenge of the Gods', Doug and Tony are aware of the sudden change and know what it means."

". . . Still, I would have liked it if each episode they had to deal with finding replacements for whatever clothes they were wearing at the end of their previous adventure: spacesuits in a coal mine, buckskins and British Redcoat on a tropical island, etc."


While generally I disagreed with Irwin Allen's approach of action-above-all-else, this is one element of it that I agree with. Forcing Doug and Tony to (1) explain their bizarre garb with each shift; and/or (2) to find appropriate clothing would have taken considerable time from the main plot. Granted, often the two scientists had to explain their usual clothing in some time eras. But in a great many---the Krakatoa episode, the WWII episodes, the 1950's Soviet time tunnel episode, and the like---their usual clothing was just suitable enough to pass without comment from the natives of the time.
I don't know enough about the War 0f 1812 to comment, myself. About the only rationale I've for the Battle of New Orleans being "decisive" is that a British victory there might've made them less likely to comply with the stipulations of the Treaty of Ghent. Don't know how likely that is.
"Yeah, I wondered about the original scouts, too - they just seem to have vanished."

A similar instance---and one more germane to the plot, if you ask me---arises in episode eleven, "Secret Weapon".

I just viewed that one again yesterday, and I spent much of the episode wondering what happened to the real "Smith" and "Williams". You'll see what I mean when you fellows get to that one.
Not at all... I find that eminently logical.

Hmm...

Forcing Doug and Tony to (1) explain their bizarre garb with each shift; and/or (2) to find appropriate clothing would have taken considerable time from the main plot.

I thought about that, but if they'd've eliminated the repetition of the previous episode's set up, that could have added several minutes to each episode. They could have turned it into a running gag. After a while they would have become proficient at it (as Sam on Quantum Leap eventually became more proficient at learning into whose body he had leapt), and less time would have been necessary to devote to that aspect of the plot.
Massacre:

Injuns!

"Maybe we gave them the slip." Maybe not.

"Summer 1876" - Little Big Horn, I'm guessing.

So this guy from the University gets to know about the Time Tunnel? No wonder spies know all about this place.

Ah, pre-PC TV "Indians"...

Doug rides a horse pretty well. A man of many talents.

Geez, Tony, you're in there with Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse - even I would've guessed who "Yellowhair" was.

"Yellow Elf"?

Ah, those good old 60's TV round-house punches...

I see what the Commander means about Team TIme Tunnel improving their techniques - they were able to send Yellow Elf back just fine.

Say, where's Wilton Parmenter?

Custer's standard falls over - dun-dun-DUNH!

Wasn't there a Twilight Zone about the Little Big Horn?

Hey, wait, they never changed their clothes in this episode!

"Welcome to Devil's Island!" Much less appealing than "Welcome to Fantasy Island!"

Another pretty good episode. I have to say that so far, I haven't seen too much of a drop-off in quality in these episodes.
Devil's Island:

"There has never been a successful escape from Stalag 13 Devil's Island!"

I like watching Team Time Tunnel play detective, trying to figure out when Doug and Tony are.

Doug, you idiot. It's the Box for you!

I want a toy guillotine!

Ah, Dreyfus...1895.

Looks like Team Time Tunnel messed it up again!

Good thing the guards are all morons...

Doug figured it all out - It's a trap!

The French Revolution? Cripes, they're liable to run into the First Doctor again!

I thought this one was good, too. Say, is it me, or have we not seen Jumpy Jerry these last two episodes?
Crack of Doom

"It'll take time - do we have it?" Well, yes, dear, you've got a time tunnel.

Ha! That's what I said!

Should he be able to make the machines work if he's outside of time?

My theory is that the "time warp" (as they called it) began about 10 feet out from the Tunnel, but the Tunnel itself was in a state of temporal flux that exended about 10 feet out from the mouth. The machinery, therefore, was operating in real time, but those seated at the console were not. (Yeah, right, Jeff. Whatever.)

I was thinking more about those spacesuits. What happened to them? They way they should have done it was to have Doug and Tony disappear from out of them and the empty space suits crumple to the ground (more difficult for the special effects of the time, but not impossible).
"I was thinking more about those spacesuits. What happened to them?"

The way I explain it is that the spacesuits returned to wherever they would have been, had not Doug and Tony shown up. In this case, they returned to the storage locker on board the rocketship.

The same would hold true for any period clothing Phillips and Newman wore during their adventures. When their usual clothing rematerialises, the things they are wearing shift back to where they would have been, had the scientists not been there to appropriate them.
Hmm...
Jeff of Earth-J said:
Not at all... I find that eminently logical.

Hmm...

Forcing Doug and Tony to (1) explain their bizarre garb with each shift; and/or (2) to find appropriate clothing would have taken considerable time from the main plot.

I thought about that, but if they'd've eliminated the repetition of the previous episode's set up, that could have added several minutes to each episode. They could have turned it into a running gag. After a while they would have become proficient at it (as Sam on Quantum Leap eventually became more proficient at learning into whose body he had leapt), and less time would have been necessary to devote to that aspect of the plot.

I look at that as the kind of television shorthand that's a good thing; with only 54 minutes from a given hour to work with (back then -- today it's more like 44-47 minutes), the less exposition, the better. Like Star Trek inventing the transporter just to put the characters immediately at the scene of the action, or how Law & Order uses intertitles instead of establishing shots. It's all good.
Jeff of Earth-J said:
I like the “reversion theory” (or whatever you want to call it). My viewing schedule is a day ahead of Bob’s discussion schedule, so I’ve already seen “End of the World.” Tomorrow I was going to speculate that either Tracy’s theory is correct and even so small a thing as coal dust cannot be transported out of its own time, or the Time Tunnel also launders their clothes. (In a way, I guess, it does.) Unless their perspiration is of the era in which it was secreted, I would assume it’s 1968 sweat. They were pretty filthy after their time in the mine yet spic ‘n’ span after their next trip, so the revision theory must be correct.

I like that there trips occasionally take them into the future. I didn’t much like that in Quantum Leap Sam Beckett was supposed to be able to jump between points in his own life time, yet never (well, seldom) travelled to the future. (Actually, I think he did once later in the series.) Maybe he didn't live that long after he stopped leaping. Granted, the underlying premise was that some “force” was controlling the leaps and he needed the help and knowledge of the future in order to change the past, but just once I would have liked to have heard Al say, “Gee, Sam, I have no idea. You’re on your own!”

I don't want to spoil anything if you haven't seen the last episode of Quantum Leap, but perhaps we should have taken the absence of jumps into Sam's future as a clue that he mightn't really have had one...

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service