Many years ago, I taught folklore at a summer camp(we had new campers each week of different ages, from 8-15). At the time, the folklore class was pretty unstructured, so I could more or less do as I pleased. Sometimes I told ghost stories, sometimes sports games, sometimes mythology, whatever I thought might be entertaining to the kids. One of the most useful things we did was two minute mysteries, as they allowed me to be lazy.

The basic rules are as follows: a scenario is laid before the people playing, and you're allowed to ask as many yes/no questions as you like to determine the answer. The answer to the question may also be 'Irrelevant' if it has no bearing on the solution.

I request the following :

* One question per post

* If you already know the answer, please keep it to yourself and let others play. Same with Googling the answer.

Once the scenario is solved, the person who solves it gets to post a new one OR they can pass it back to someone else who's interested (FYI, I'm happy to post more).

So here's the first scenario:

A man is found dead, surrounded by 52 bicycles. What happened?

Views: 9376

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

No.

Peter Wrexham said:

Are they (Superman, Spider-man etc) the actual people normally meant by those names/titles?

Are they toys, collectable statuettes or similar?

Yes.

I'll tentatively say you have it, pending a close-enough explanation of events.

Peter Wrexham said:

Are they toys, collectable statuettes or similar?

I think I've got the general solution, though it comes in a number of variant forms:

a) Red Velvet is a super-villain setting up their (five-cornered) trophy room with statues of foes, rivals etc.  They intend to play Dan Hill's records for background music.  Instead of a standard super-villain's white Persian cat, they have a black cat, which is able to wander out through the door at will.

b) Red Velvet is a collector setting up a display of some of their collectables, again with Dan Hill music and their cat.

c) Red Velvet is a child playing with their toys, records and cat in a five-cornered room.

I can't explain the significance of the Port Townsend location, or the name "Red Velvet"

Good enough! He has placed four statues/action figures in corners and his black cat in another. The cat is free to leave when it wants. It almost certainly will.

Red Velvet was a clue that turned out to be not very helpful. Obviously, anyone could put some figures and a cat in a room.

The Rain City Superhero movement, the most significant outbreak of "real-life" superheroes, took place in Seattle and was led by Phoenix Jones (Ben Fodor). During its height, Red Velvet (Ryan Cory) proclaimed himself a "real-life" supervillain, partially to comment on the real-life superheroes and partially because I think he found it entertaining. He did not engage in actual supervillainy, though he did engage in some supervillain-themed stunts that amount to performance art, and he participated at least once in a charitable event. I thought someone around here might know about him and ask if he's the one I meant. Since he's obviously a real person and not much of a villain, the only Superman, Spider-man, etcetera he would have access to are the fictional ones.

Your turn!

Ah.  I searched online for "Red Velvet supervillain", and found the Justice League Action character I mentioned before, and also the Seattle "real life supervillain".  However, the references I found give his name as Rex Velvet, so I decided that he wasn't the character you meant!

I'll be back later with the next puzzle.

Ah, sorry about that. I have been misremembering that name. My brain is saying he changed his name at some point, but I can find no evidence of that online.


Peter Wrexham said:

Ah.  I searched online for "Red Velvet supervillain", and found the Justice League Action character I mentioned before, and also the Seattle "real life supervillain".  However, the references I found give his name as Rex Velvet, so I decided that he wasn't the character you meant!

I'll be back later with the next puzzle.

He planned to start a new life by murdering his wife, and resolved to do it at 8:46 that evening, the exact moment he turned 40.  But then she came to the office, to take him for a birthday dinner downtown before going home.  She dawdled so long over the meal and drinks that it was 8:45 when they parked outside the house.  Still, the porch was dark enough that he could club her down with his blackjack before opening the door to drag her inside.

What goes wrong with his plan?

Was there a motion-detecting light on the porch? 

Does 8:46 carry any significance to the problem beyond being a time he arbitrarily selected?

No.

Randy Jackson said:

Was there a motion-detecting light on the porch? 

No (other than it being his time of birth).

JD DeLuzio said:

Does 8:46 carry any significance to the problem beyond being a time he arbitrarily selected?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service