Music? What song? By whom?

Podcasts? Which ones? Who's on it?

The whir of your hard drive while you defrag?

Whatever you're listening to, share it with the Legion of Superfluous Heroes!

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Rockabilly is always good for a listen.

I am currently listening to Three Dog Night's first album. I was a big fan of the band during their late Sixties/early Seventies hey day. One track on the album that sounds much better to me today than it did way back when is Don't Make Promise, the most laid back song on the album.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Lately I’ve been listening to inexpensive collections from such labels as One Day Music, Real Gone Music and Not Now Music. Respectively, these are a two CD collection of The Chess Story, a four CD collection of Sun Singles, and a four CD collectioin of “Rockabilly Greats.”

"Rockabilly is always good for a listen."

Have you ever heard of "psychobilly"? Psychobilly is described as a cross between '50s rockabilly and '70s punk, as exemplified by such bands as The Cramps in the '70s, Demented Are Go in the '80s and Tiger Army in the '90s. the CD I bought is The Roots of Psychobilly, so I still haven't heard any.

If you're interested in psychobilly, I would recommend The Reverend Horton Heat (a Dallas band, just so you know). 

I also really like The Brains' The Monser Within album.

I'm certainly no expert on the genre, but I do enjoy the fact that the acts don't take themselves to seriously, and are having fun

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Rockabilly is always good for a listen."

Have you ever heard of "psychobilly"? Psychobilly is described as a cross between '50s rockabilly and '70s punk, as exemplified by such bands as The Cramps in the '70s, Demented Are Go in the '80s and Tiger Army in the '90s. the CD I bought is The Roots of Psychobilly, so I still haven't heard any.

Just started going back and listening to a lot of classic Power Pop albums from the late 70s/early 80s.

Standouts for me are the first few Shoes albums.  Some really well written, concise, crunchy guitar-pop songs on all of those records.  And also, the Dwight Twilley Band which featured some amazingly talented musicians from Tulsa Oklahoma including Twilley, his partner in crime Phil Seymour, and the great guitarist Bill Pitcock IV.  I really like the second Twilley Band album, "Twilley Don't Mind" as well as Seymour's self titled solo album and Twilley's first solo effort, "Twilley."  All contain tons of expertly written power pop gems.

NPR featured "Smells Like Teen Spirit" on their "America Anthems" series last week, which led (in a roundabout way) to me listening to Richard Cheese today.

STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE Soundtrack (1997): After watching the three prequels and Star Wars: A Musical Journey, I decided to listen to the soundtrack of the original film. One thing I remember quite strongly from 1977 is the pre-publicity hype surrounding John Williams’ score. I bought the soundtrack on vinyl before I was ever even able to see the movie and I practically wore it out listening to it. I did get to see it before my best friend did, however. I remember that he expressed concern that the music would “get in the way” of the action and prove too distracting. I am proud to admit I still have the original liner notes, which were printed on a loose sheet of paper rather than on the album cover itself. I find these notes, written by Williams himself, to be in many ways superior to the ones included with the 1997 reissue.

Having said all that, though, the 1997 reissue is far superior. For one thing, not only is the score complete, but it is also presented in movie order. Not only that, but there are archival tracks as well. For example, “Binary Sunset” was originally scored using Ben’s theme but, at the request of George Lucas, Williams changed it to Luke’s theme. This is a fact upon which both sets of liner notes agree, but only the reissue has the archival track. Speaking of the liner notes, the ones for the reissue are almost as good as the ones Williams wrote for the original. The original Star Wars is unquestionably the most influential soundtrack album in my life.

Here's a link to the song Tell Me by Chicago's original guitarist Terry Kath. It was originally recorded for the soundtrack of a film titled Electraglide in Blue. It is very patriotic (and somewhat religious), 7 minutes 45 seconds in length.

I broke out my summertime music this past weekend… old favorites (John Fogerty – Centerfield) and relatively new favorites (Steven Tyler - We’re All Somebody from Somewhere) as well. In addition, I bought two brand new albums:

Western Stars – Bruce Springsteen

Ride Me Back Home – Willie Nelson

I bought two more collections at HPB:

AMERICAN HEARTBEAT – 1950s: I had previously bought the one for the year 1959 (2 discs, 50 songs), but this one is 3 discs, 75 songs. One Day Music.

BORN BAD – 40 Tales of Bad Boys & Dirty Deeds: What I like about this themed collection is that it crosses genres: blues, rock & roll, country, bluegrass. Not Now Music.

New York Spots radio.

I am a huge Mets fan and they have really turned it on since the All Star Break.

I enjoy hearing fans calling in with their opinions on their team.

The Next Picture Show film podcast. Currently comparing the recent The Art of Self Defense with Fight Club. 

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