Criminal Minds: "Amplification"

Views: 6821

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

There was a period when some shows were given new titles for their syndicated reruns. Some examples I remember:

  • Bonanza was retitled Ponderosa
  • Emergency! was called Emergency! One
  • Dragnet was called Badge 714 

Some others I've just turned up:

  • The Andy Griffith Show was called Andy of Mayberry
  • The Dick Van Dyke Show was called The Dick Van Dyke Daytime Show
  • Happy Days was called Happy Days Again
  • Laverne & Shirley was called Laverne & Shirley and Company
  • Magnum, P.I. was called Magnum
  • The Rockford Files was called Jim Rockford, Private Investigator
  • Ironside was called The Raymond Burr Show
  • You'll Never Get Rich/The Phil Silvers Show was called Sgt. Bilko
  • CHiPS was called CHiPS Patrol
  • Lassie was called Jeff's Collie
  • Private Secretary was called Susie
  • Gunsmoke was called Marshal Dillon
  • Marcus Welby, M.D. was called Robert Young, Family Doctor
  • Hawaii Five-O was called McGarrett
  • Wagon Train was called Major Adams - Trailmaster
  • Quincy, M.E. was called Quincy

Why? Supposedly, to avoid confusing the audience by distinguishing the syndicated reruns from the new episodes still being produced. Personally, I find it more confusing to give a show an entirely different name. 

I'm not finding a clear answer on if this was a general practice or an actual FCC requirement.

Lassie was called Timmy & Lassie when the Timmy episodes went into syndication.

I think that, for the most part, the new titles were used for the syndicated reruns. Probably a decision of the suits doing the syndicating.

I can't be sure, but I suspect that the Bilko show changed titles during its original run. People who had heard of the funny Army show probably had an  easier time finding it in their newspaper guide with the name Sgt Bilko rather than the less obvious title You'll Never Get Rich.

Interestingly, the Wiki article says that the final episode (like Seinfeld) had Bilko and his henchmen behind bars, with the last line being "That's All Folks.".

I used to watch The Lone Ranger every morning from 6:30-7:00 before school all throughout elementary school. By the time I got to junior high I was at the point that I could identify the entire plot of a given episode in just a few seconds. There are only a few plots that really stuck with me. As I'm working my way through the series today, there are very few I recall specifically at all. This strikes me as odd because there are other shows I watched back then during prime times (notably Planet of the Apes and Kung Fu) that I remembered much better when i re-watched them for the first time in three decades in the mid-2Ks even though I'd seen them only once (or twice at best). 

It was at the time when I had become so overly familiar with The Lone Ranger that I switched to watching Lassie re-runs before school. first Jeff's Collie, then Timmy and Lassie. I didn't know at the time that those were the syndicated titles; I thought those were the actual names of the show. I was a bit confused at the switch. The sets were the same and the town was still Calverton, yet the family that lived there was completely different. I just assumed it was a reboot (although I didn't call it that then) and the producer just kept the sets and the basic background in a cost-saving measure. It wasn't until years later I didcovered they were part of the same continuity. In the early 2Ks I bought a 50th anniversary set which included what I call "the transition episodes" from Jeff to Timmy. It made a whole lot more sense after that!

Richard Willis said:

I think that, for the most part, the new titles were used for the syndicated reruns. Probably a decision of the suits doing the syndicating.

I can't be sure, but I suspect that the Bilko show changed titles during its original run. People who had heard of the funny Army show probably had an  easier time finding it in their newspaper guide with the name Sgt Bilko rather than the less obvious title You'll Never Get Rich.

Right. The original title was You'll Never Get Rich, and was changed to The Phil Silvers Show (per Wiki, which has a screen grab of the title card). The syndicated rerun title was Sgt. Bilko.

EDIT: I failed to mention that we give You'll Never Get Rich / The Phil Silvers Show / Sgt. Bilko a thorough going-over in the ever popular thread "Military Sitcoms."

BONANZA: Not only is Bonanza a great source of "Hey, it's that guy!" actors, but there are also quite a few from Star Trek, including the guys who played: Mr. Bailey and Balok from "The Corbomite Maneuver"; Zepham Cochrane from Metamorphosis"; Dr. Piper from "The Cage"; and Spock from various episodes. 

ASIDE: I can remember "explaining" both Bonanza and Star Trek to my grandmother when I was about five years old. "His name's not 'Horse.' it's "Hoss'," I would say, and "His name's not 'Spark,' it's 'Spock'." I'm sure I really cleared that up for her.

HORSEMANSHIP: Although we have been horse riding only once since we were married, Tracy used to ride frequently when she was a little girl. she is constantly critiquing the horsemanship of various TV and movie actors. A while back I referred to Bonanza as the "My Three Sons of the New West." Coincidentally, Tim Considine guest-starred on an episode we watched recently, and Tracy held him up as an example of how to handle a horse properly. Then, surprisingly, she said he was a better rider than Clayton Moore, which i questioned (privately).

WHO WAS THAT MASKED WOMAN?: Speaking of The Lone Ranger, Phyllis Coates guest starred in "The Woman in the White Mask" in the titular role. Her character had light colored hair, but in her role as the local bandit leader, she wore a dark wig, a white mask and spoke with a Mexican accent. Tracy recognized her first. (Odd, because her dark wig made her look like Lois Lane wearing a white mask.) Tracy didn't know who it was, but she knew it was someone she knew. When the woman took off her wig and mask and stopped speaking in a Mexican accent (which I did peg as fake), then I pegged her as Phyllis Coates. If a pair of glasses can fool Lois Lane, then I guess a white mask and a fake accent can fool me... at least for a little while. But not Tracy, though.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

WHO WAS THAT MASKED WOMAN?: Speaking of The Lone Ranger, Phyllis Coates guest starred in "The Woman in the White Mask" in the titular role. Her character had light colored hair, but in her role as the local bandit leader, she wore a dark wig, a white mask and spoke with a Mexican accent. Tracy recognized her first. (Odd, because her dark wig made her look like Lois Lane wearing a white mask.) Tracy didn't know who it was, but she knew it was someone she knew. When the woman took off her wig and mask and stopped speaking in a Mexican accent (which I did peg as fake), then I pegged her as Phyllis Coates. If a pair of glasses can fool Lois Lane, then I guess a white mask and a fake accent can fool me... at least for a little while. But not Tracy, though.

In The Last Son of Krypton, the Superman movie tie-in novel by Elliot S. Maggin, there's a passage where Superman thinks to himself that he has to be a passable actor to play Clark Kent every night before a large TV audience when he anchors the WGBS news. 

(I'd dig up the reference myself, since the folks over at the fan site Superman Through the Ages have posted the entire novel, but I don't have the time today.)

Don't trouble yourself. I have the paperback (and Miracle Monday as well). 

Jeff of Earth-J said:

…. "His name's not 'Spark,' it's 'Spock'."

Many confused his name with the well-known author of Baby and Child Care, Dr Benjamin Spock and thought the Star Trek character was Doctor Spock.

Tim Considine guest-starred on an episode we watched recently, and Tracy held him up as an example of how to handle a horse properly.

Tim Considine first became well-known playing the character Spin on Spin and Marty, a recurring series set on a ranch. Marty was an orphan and newcomer to the ranch and Spin was the experienced horseman. It was a series within the first version of The Mickey Mouse Club. Fun fact: In the movie Patton, Considine played the nameless Soldier Who Gets Slapped.

ClarkKent_DC said:

In The Last Son of Krypton, the Superman movie tie-in novel by Elliot S. Maggin, there's a passage where Superman thinks to himself that he has to be a passable actor to play Clark Kent every night before a large TV audience when he anchors the WGBS news. 

 Maggin made an error, IMO. He was reared as Clark Kent and was him. He wouldn’t have had to “play him.”

I haven't read it, but isn't it related to (though not at all the same as) the '78 movie? The film took its cue from most of Superman history up to that point, Silver Age but rooted in the Golden Age, when Kent took on a fictional persona, a Clark Kent he wasn't, a mild-mannered reporter bordering on cowardly, certainly dorky, awkward. To quote Jules Feiffer in The Great Comic Book Heroes:

Previous heroes-- the Shadow, the Green Hornet, the Lone Ranger-- were not only more vulnerable; they were fakes. I don't mean to criticize; it's just a statement of fact. The Shadow had to cloud men's minds to be in business. The Green Hornet had to go through the fetishist fol-de-rol of donning costume, floppy hat, black mask, gas gun, menacing automobile, and insect sound effects before he was even ready to go out in the street. The Lone Ranger needed an accoutremental white horse, an Indian, and an establishing cry of Hi-Yo Silver to separate him from all those other masked men running around the West in days of yesteryear.

But Superman had only to wake up in the morning to be Superman. In his case, Clark Kent was the put-on. The fellow with the eyeglasses and the acne and the walk girls laughed at wasn't real, didn't exist, was a sacrificial disguise, an act of discreet martyrdom. Had they but known!...

... Kent existed not for the purpose of the story but for the reader. He is Superman's opinion of the rest of us, a pointed caricature of what we, the noncriminal element, were really like. His fake identity was our real one. That's why we loved him so. For if that wasn't really, us, if there were no Clark Kents, only lots of glasses and cheap suits which, when removed, revealed all of us in our true identities-- what a hell of an improved world it would have been! (18- 19)

That's not how he has been presented in many of the more recent incarnations (since the 1980s, in particular, which took its cue from the 1950s TV series), but it is true of many versions of the character.

Richard Willis said:

ClarkKent_DC said:

In The Last Son of Krypton, the Superman movie tie-in novel by Elliot S. Maggin, there's a passage where Superman thinks to himself that he has to be a passable actor to play Clark Kent every night before a large TV audience when he anchors the WGBS news. 

 Maggin made an error, IMO. He was reared as Clark Kent and was him. He wouldn’t have had to “play him.”

ClarkKent_DC said:

In The Last Son of Krypton, the Superman movie tie-in novel by Elliot S. Maggin, there's a passage where Superman thinks to himself that he has to be a passable actor to play Clark Kent every night before a large TV audience when he anchors the WGBS news.

Richard Willis said:

Maggin made an error, IMO. He was reared as Clark Kent and was him. He wouldn’t have had to “play him.”

I get what you're getting at, and I may have mischaracterized Maggin's depiction. What he was getting at was Kent presenting himself in such a way to the viewing audience that people wouldn't come to think of any similarities to another public figure who frequently gets covered on the WGBS News. 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service