Criminal Minds: "Amplification"

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I much preferred Happy Day's first two seasons when the show was filmed in a studio and Richie was the focus of the stories. It had much more of an American Graffiti vibe. When they went to a live audience in season three Fonzie had become the star and it seemed like the actors were playing/mugging for the studio audience to the detriment of the stories.

If the episode begins with "Rock Around the Clock," it's almost always a better episode than one that starts with "Happy Days."

Happy Day's first two seasons... had much more of an American Graffiti vibe."

According to Wikipedia, Happy Days spun out of a pilot episode of Love American Style titled "Love and the Television Set" (later retitled "Love and the Happy Days"), which I have never seen. (Too bad it's not included on the DVD release.) "Based on the pilot, director George Lucas cast Howard as the lead in his 1973 film American Graffiti, causing ABC to take a renewed interest in the pilot," and the series sprang from that.

I'm enjoying the first season episodes so much I may buy the second season as well.  

It had been pitched as a series-- New Family in Town-- but rejected, leading to it ending up on Love American Style. It was on YouTube a bunch of years ago, so I saw it-- different Howard, Joanie, and Chuck (yes--the guy nobody recalls was played by three people) and no Fonzie. Some of the footage was reused in a first season episode, "Who's Sorry Now?" as a flashback.

I remember seeing the Love American Style episode, but not much about it. I'll have to seek out the pilot on YouTube.

I dimly remember seeing the Love American Style episode, too. Harold Gould of The Legion of "Hey, It's That Guy!" Character Actors played the dad.

In the first and second seasons, Happy Days was a coming-of-age story about Ritchie, being led around (and sometimes astray) by his more worldly-wise buddies Potsie and Ralph. (Yes, really.) It sounds ridiculous that Potsie and Ralph were supposed to be the worldly-wise ones, especially after the show was retooled in Season 3 to capitalize on Fonzie's sudden popularity. And Fonzie's presence made older brother Chuck superfluous, and thus expendable.

In an alternate universe, there must be a TV show starring all three guys who played Chuck as brothers. 

"I'm Chuck, this is my brother Chuck, and this is my other brother Chuck. "

THE STORY OF LATE NIGHT: This is a CNN original series that airs Sunday nights. The first episode covered from Steve Allen to Jack Paar to Johnny Carson. Episode two continued with Carson and folding in Merv Griffin, Joey Bishop, Dick Cavett and others. There's a lot of info here I didn't know. Well worth one's time. 

Thanks for calling our attention to this. Apparently there are six episodes. The first ones are available On Demand. I'm recording the episodes going forward.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

THE STORY OF LATE NIGHT: This is a CNN original series that airs Sunday nights. The first episode covered from Steve Allen to Jack Paar to Johnny Carson. Episode two continued with Carson and folding in Merv Griffin, Joey Bishop, Dick Cavett and others. There's a lot of info here I didn't know. Well worth one's time. 

I gave a try to Getting On, an HBO dramedy circa 2013 about the staff in the geriatric ward of a run-down hospital that makes St. Elsewhere look like the Ritz-Carlton Hotel. I can only take it in small doses (no pun intended); it's rather bleak.

I also belatedly discovered My Name Is Earl, an NBC sitcom I never watched when it was live. Title character Earl Hickey is a two-bit thief and lowlife who wins $100,000 with a scratch-off lottery ticket -- which he promptly loses 10 seconds later when he cheers his good fortune and gets hit by a car.

While recovering in the hospital, Earl sees Carson Daly on TV talking about karma and how he has a good life because he tries to do good things. Earl has a epiphany, concluding his life is crappy because he's done lots of bad things and lost the lottery ticket because he didn't deserve the winnings. So he makes a long (long) list of every bad thing he's ever done, and sets out to contact the people involved and make things right. Soon after he completes his first mission, he finds the lottery ticket, confirming in his mind he's on the right course. 

It's a wonderfully goofy show, and I appreciate the theme of a guy committed to spreading more good in the world. 

Tracy and I loved My Name Is Earl. Too bad it lasted only two seasons. Every once in a while we still call "Karma..." like they did on the show. 

Actually, it lasted four. But I think the first two were the best. Season 1 was darn near perfect, for exactly the reasons CK points out -- it's a gloriously goofy redemption story.

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