Criminal Minds: "Amplification"

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My paternal grandfather was the exception that proved this rule. He loved cop shows. He did say that Barney Miller was the most realistic because it showed all the paper-work that cops had to do.

ClarkKent_DC said:

These days, I'm a devotee of Chicago Fire. I probably wouldn't be if I was a firefighter, the same way police officers don't like cop shows, lawyers don't like courtroom dramas, doctors and nurses can't stand medical shows, etc.

ClarkKent_DC said:

These days, I'm a devotee of Chicago Fire. I probably wouldn't be if I was a firefighter, the same way police officers don't like cop shows, lawyers don't like courtroom dramas, doctors and nurses can't stand medical shows, etc.

The Baron said:

My paternal grandfather was the exception that proved this rule. He loved cop shows. He did say that Barney Miller was the most realistic because it showed all the paper-work that cops had to do.

Sure. Not only that, on Barney Miller, they were in a neighborhood precinct and dealt with neighborhood problems such as purse-snatchers, muggers, burglars, hookers, disgruntled store owners, apartment tenants at risk of eviction, etc. Most Barney Miller stories, in one way or another, were about two parties having some kind of dispute that needed mediation, not policing, but got out of hand. 

On the other hand, there's Law & Order, which has the neighborhood precinct detectives traipsing all over town and sometimes into neighboring states chasing down intricate murder plots -- despite the fact that here on Earth-Prime, murder cases in New York are handled by specialty squads in Manhattan North or Manhattan South. When the guys on Barney Miller got to be that specialty squad, they hated it; it ruined their relationship with their neighbors.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Paramedics and EMTs are a standard part of life now, but back when Emergency! debuted in 1972, they were a new, unproven and still-developing concept.

In the 1960s in the eastern part of Los Angeles County, the only ambulances were station wagons belonging to funeral homes (a slight conflict of interest).  

On the wrong side of believable is Station 19, a spinoff from Grey's Anatomy, a medical show that breaks suspension of disbelief and grinds it into sawdust on a regular basis. I've seen Station 19 a couple of times, but just couldn't stand it.

You and I will shortly be entertained by a crossover between Grey’s Anatomy and Station 19. The Station 19 characters have been showing up on Grey’s so much that I thought their show had been cancelled.

ClarkKent_DC said:

On the wrong side of believable is Station 19, a spinoff from Grey's Anatomy, a medical show that breaks suspension of disbelief and grinds it into sawdust on a regular basis. I've seen Station 19 a couple of times, but just couldn't stand it.

Richard Willis said:

You and I will shortly be entertained by a crossover between Grey’s Anatomy and Station 19. The Station 19 characters have been showing up on Grey’s so much that I thought their show had been cancelled.

Quite the opposite; going forward, characters from each show will frequently appear on the other, and there will be more crossovers.

After all, Station 19 began with one of the Grey's Anatomy surgeons having a midlife crisis and deciding to become a firefighter ... and this was a guy who had already switched from being an anesthesiologist to being a surgeon. Plus, he's married to the hospital chief. (See what I mean about grinding suspension of disbelief into sawdust?) And the head plastic surgeon on Grey's Anatomy is dating an EMT on Station 19.

They are going for a "One Chicago" vibe, the way the Dick Wolf Factory has characters from Chicago FireChicago P.D. and Chicago Med casually pop up on the others' shows.

For my part, I was in on Chicago Fire from the beginning. I watched Chicago P.D. for one season and bailed; they kept telling us to root for these brutal, crooked cops, and I couldn't stomach it any more. (At least on The Shield, they didn't pretend their corrupt cops were role models.) Chicago Med I never took to -- it can't hold a candle to ER -- and nobody liked Chicago Justice, which got canceled after one season.

We binged the three-episode Dracula from BBC/Netflix. I wrote a little about it this week (posted tomorrow), but the tl;dr version is: First episode, fantastic; second episode, still very good; third episode terrible.

We still have some stuff to catch up on (Harley Quinn, others I don't remember), but we're in the market for another binge-able show before The CW returns next week and takes over our TV. We've already done Lost in Space Season 2, The Mandalorian, The Witcher, The Expanse Season 4, Titans Season 2, For All Mankind and Watchmen. Is V-Wars any good? (I hated the comic book.) The Messiah?

If you've never seen it, Longmire on Netflix is great. There are 63 episodes covering 6 seasons. The first three were from A&E. When A&E dropped it Netflix continued it. It's not a cowboy show. To a great extent it's a Native American story set in modern Montana. Longmire is an old-school sheriff who has to coordinate wit the tribal police. The Native Americans are played by real Native Americans, prominently Lou Diamond Phillips, A Martinez and Zahn McClarnon. Longmire's deputy is played by Katee Sackhoff (Blacksmith from The Flash, minus the fake British accent). The stories are involving, serious and with a generous helping of Native American culture. You could watch it in satisfying chunks. I'm sure both you and your wife would enjoy it.

Oddly, the oldies channels had a lot of pilot episodes and series debuts on last weekend. So I fired up the DVR and collected the pilot episode of Frasier, the pilot and second episode of The Bernie Mac Show, the pilot and following three episodes of Living Single, the two-part series debut of The Bionic Woman, the first three episodes of Starsky and Hutch, the series debut and subsequent episode of Emergency!, and the debut and second and fourth episode of Charlie's Angels. (Don't know why, but they didn't show the third episode. But the fourth is the well-known "Angels in Chains" episode, where they go undercover at a prison farm.)

There also was the American version of The Office, a show my son loves but I never took to, so I gave it another try. I recorded the entire first season and three episodes into the second. But after watching the pilot and second episode, I deleted them all. I couldn't stomach Steve Carell's arrogant clueless boss and Rainn Wilson's arrogant arrogant sidekick. Carell's character is supposed to be clueless but likeable enough that you want to watch him each episode ... and I don't like Michael Scott that much and didn't want to. 

I could have recorded the Emergency! pilot movie, "The Wedsworth-Townsend Act," but I've seen it before and didn't think I could take that much dullness again. Unfortunately, the Bionic Woman pilot made up for it. There are TV commercials for senior citizen's life insurance that are far more exciting.

Starsky and Hutch was from the Aaron Spelling Factory, and I appreciated that they were fully formed. It wasn't, as many series debuts are, about the new guy starting his first day at work. Nothing wrong with that, but we've seen it a lot. It also was very '70s, with lots of chase scenes and shootouts.

Charlie's Angels was also very '70s: "Once upon a time, there were three little girls who went to the police academy. And they were each assigned very hazardous duties. But I took them all away from all that, and now they work for me. My name is Charlie."

That intro showing our stars as rookie police officers doing mundane things like typing, writing tickets and being a crossing guard was spot on in that in the 1970s, female police officers going on street patrol and doing the same job as the men was still new and only beginning to be allowed in many police agencies.

Just saying that shows I'm giving Charlie's Angels too much thought, because it certainly wasn't about making a grand statement on female empowerment. It was definitely in the "turn your brain off and watch" category. (And in the Mary Ann vs. Ginger, Betty vs. Veronica sense, I choose Jaclyn Smith, all day, every day.)

I watched episodes 2 and 3 of Starsky and Hutch last weekend and kept thinking that something must have been cut to get more time for commercials. It wasn't as good as I remembered it being, but I could see that it had the potential for being good.

Watching Occupied Season 3.

We're finishing up the first season of Will & Grace on DVD.

Over the weekend, we bought a shrink-wrapped set of the first season of Mary Tyler Moore at Half Price Books.

Bill Malloy is ... DEAD!?!

Oooohhhh ... I bet that weaselly Roger did it!

I've been watching the Netflix series You. It's about an oddly attractive psychopath, and I find myself into Season 2. I enjoyed the second season of Lost In Space, too.

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