Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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"UNITY" & MAGNUS' "ORIGIN": It's been a long time since we last discussed Valiant's "Unitiy" in this forum (unsurprising since it's 28 years old). I have a four volume slipcased set which puts all of the "chapters" in "order" but I have learned that the best way to read it is to read the Miller-cover-issues (AUG) and the SImonson-cover-issues (SEP) between the bookends Unity #0 and Unity #1, that doesn't work so well if your goal is to discover the "origin" of Magnus. If you read only Harbinger #8-9 (Chapters 8 & 16), you miss the scenes of Geomancer revealing to Kris that the baby she;s carrying is actually Magnus and the scene of Magnus holding himself as a baby; if you read only Magnus #16-17 (Chapters 4 & 12), you miss the revelation of Magnus' father and the scene of Kris handing the baby over to Geomancer.

My recommended order is Magnus #15 (Chapter 4), Harbinger #8 (Chapter 8), Magnus #16 (Chapter 12) and Harbinger #9 (Chapter 16), followed by Magnus #20. (Magnus #20 precedes Magnus #15, but it follows Harbinger #9.) That "chapter order" Unity collection doesn't read very well, BTW; it's non-linear and duplicative. I would really like to see an omnibus-like collection putting all of the material in strict chronological order (although it would still be somewhat duplicative), but I don't see much chance of that happening for a universe that doesn't exist anymore.

THE ORIGINAL TUROK, SON OF STONE: In 1995, Valiant launched some short-lived reprints of Gold Key's Magnus, Solar and Turok series. Also, Dark Horse has released 10 archival volumes of Turok Son of Stone reprinting the first 67 issues. I tried keeping up with those, really i did, but I got only as far as volume three (#18). If I had only stuck with it a bit longer, though! Alberto Gioletti (who would go on to illustrated 90 issues) started in #24. TOTSOS #1 reprints #24,25 & 42. (I don't know who wrote those stories, but I'm guessing Paul S. Newman.) Giolotti's style reminds me very much of Doug Wildey's (a complimrnt if there ever was one). for completists, TOTSOS #2 reprints Four Color #596 (#1), #656 (#2) and #7. I capped off this little reading session with Magnus #12 (1992), the reintroduction of Turok and the Lost Land into modern Valiant continuity.

THE ORIGINAL DOCTOR SOLAR MAN OF THE ATOM #1: This one reprints #1 (origin) and #5 (costume). the artwork was "enhanced" by broadening and reformatting certain panels in order to achieve a "more dynamic" effect. Personally, I think the attempt failed. If you want only a taste of original 1960s Solar, this will give it to you. More complete is the Dark Horse "archive" series (four volumes, 31 issues) or one (that i know of) tpb. Personally, I would recommend the single tpb. The archives, like the Magnus archives, retain the original coloring reproduced on slick paper. the tpb (all you need, really) is reprinted on a more "absorbent" paper stock. Also, beyond the first dozen or so issues, Solar is about as boring and repetitive as early issues of Turok.

Man, I don't remember "Unity" and "Origin" at all. It's entirely possible I read them and forgot them. But more likely I just didn't get them; in those days I was relying on the publishers to send me books to review, and if they didn't, then I didn't read them. Valiant in particular was pretty spotty. Are these books I need to read, Jeff?

Meanwhile, I re-read The Marvels Project. I remember the first time I read it, I came away thinking that I didn't understand a lot of it because I just wasn't that familiar with Golden Age Marvel characters. Now I am (pretty much), and it turns out there's some stuff that really doesn't hold together well.

For example, much is made of John Steele, a character I wasn't sure actually existed in Golden Age Marvel. Turns out he did, for exactly one story in Daring  Mystery Comics #1. He probably had twice as much panel time in Marvels Project ... but his story didn't go anywhere. At the end, he just disappeared. His story was later finished in, of all places, Secret Avengers.

But the point is, why did Brubaker spend so much time with a character and then just drop his story like a rock? Was he planning a sequel? A John Steele series? Regardless, it was unsatisfying in Marvels Project proper.

Also left unanswered is a question asked several times in the series, which is why the Human Torch, who was not human, felt such an affinity for humanity? There was some vague talk about whether he had a soul, or what his original "spark" was, and it felt like Brubaker was going somewhere with this. And then he stopped. Later writers, like in Invaders, had Jim Hammond go the opposite way on humanity, so the question remains unanswered. Just another loose thread from Marvels Project.

That being said, I really like a lot about the series, enough that I recommend it. The art is good, and the way it ties a lot of goofy Golden Age stuff into a sort of a linear narrative is pretty remarkable. For example, Brubaker establishes how the formula that turned Keen Marlow into The Destroyer in Mystic Comics #6 was related to Erskine's formula for Steve Rogers, which only makes sense. (It also fleshed out Roy Thomas' retcon that Keen Marlow was simply a disguise for Brain Falsworth.)

It also explains why Phantom Bullet only appeared once in the Golden Age. Short answer: He was killed! That's a pretty straightforward way to handle it! Of course, it does not answer why the Phantom Reporter only appeared in one issue. He got his story told eventually in The Twelve, but Marvels Project is mum.

But, as I say, it's a pretty good series despite some minor flaws. It even weaves in the Two-Gun Kid's time traveling in an imaginative way. And it kinda made me like the Golden Age Angel more than I had before.

One thing, though: The Ferret is killed in this series before the creation of Captain America. I don't know how this squares with his actual Golden Age appearances, or with his other retcon appearances, like Marvel Comics #1000 and the Mystery Men series in 2011, which I don't think I read. And I seem to remember him being in one of the 70th anniversary books, but not which one, or what happened to him there. Does anyone know if this stuff all lines up?

Captain, that would be the Marvel Mystery Comics 70th Anniversary Special. Written by Tom DeFalco, it involved the Ferret teaming up with the Sub-Mariner, the Human Torch & Toro, the Angel and Electro from The Twelve. Set in Spring 1941, the Ferret was helping Policewoman Betty Dean (portrayed as a brunette for some reason) to find the missing inventor of Electro, Prof. Zog from Nazis (who else?) and some Green Flame robots.

The Ferret wore a top hat and seemed very upper class. He had no pet ferret in this story which he survived.

A cool extra was the Ferret story from Marvel Mystery Comics #5 (Ma'40). Here he's described as a "Mystery Detective", Nosey the ferret played a large role and he is much more like Sam Spade than Nick Charles.

Skipper, you reminded me of our exchange from the History of the Marvel Universe thread:

Baron: "Also never heard of Eben Stafford,the Man on the Wall, or John  Steele, "America's first super-soldier".

Skipper: "Me neither. Who are these people? Are they a complete retcon, or is this some a re-working of existing material?"


Captain Comics said:

Man, I don't remember "Unity" and "Origin" at all. It's entirely possible I read them and forgot them. But more likely I just didn't get them; in those days I was relying on the publishers to send me books to review, and if they didn't, then I didn't read them. Valiant in particular was pretty spotty. Are these books I need to read, Jeff?

Meanwhile, I re-read The Marvels Project. I remember the first time I read it, I came away thinking that I didn't understand a lot of it because I just wasn't that familiar with Golden Age Marvel characters. Now I am (pretty much), and it turns out there's some stuff that really doesn't hold together well.

For example, much is made of John Steele, a character I wasn't sure actually existed in Golden Age Marvel. Turns out he did, for exactly one story in Daring  Mystery Comics #1. He probably had twice as much panel time in Marvels Project ... but his story didn't go anywhere. At the end, he just disappeared. His story was later finished in, of all places, Secret Avengers.

But the point is, why did Brubaker spend so much time with a character and then just drop his story like a rock? Was he planning a sequel? A John Steele series? Regardless, it was unsatisfying in Marvels Project proper.

Also left unanswered is a question asked several times in the series, which is why the Human Torch, who was not human, felt such an affinity for humanity? There was some vague talk about whether he had a soul, or what his original "spark" was, and it felt like Brubaker was going somewhere with this. And then he stopped. Later writers, like in Invaders, had Jim Hammond go the opposite way on humanity, so the question remains unanswered. Just another loose thread from Marvels Project.

That being said, I really like a lot about the series, enough that I recommend it. The art is good, and the way it ties a lot of goofy Golden Age stuff into a sort of a linear narrative is pretty remarkable. For example, Brubaker establishes how the formula that turned Keen Marlow into The Destroyer in Mystic Comics #6 was related to Erskine's formula for Steve Rogers, which only makes sense. (It also fleshed out Roy Thomas' retcon that Keen Marlow was simply a disguise for Brain Falsworth.)

It also explains why Phantom Bullet only appeared once in the Golden Age. Short answer: He was killed! That's a pretty straightforward way to handle it! Of course, it does not answer why the Phantom Reporter only appeared in one issue. He got his story told eventually in The Twelve, but Marvels Project is mum.

But, as I say, it's a pretty good series despite some minor flaws. It even weaves in the Two-Gun Kid's time traveling in an imaginative way. And it kinda made me like the Golden Age Angel more than I had before.

One thing, though: The Ferret is killed in this series before the creation of Captain America. I don't know how this squares with his actual Golden Age appearances, or with his other retcon appearances, like Marvel Comics #1000 and the Mystery Men series in 2011, which I don't think I read. And I seem to remember him being in one of the 70th anniversary books, but not which one, or what happened to him there. Does anyone know if this stuff all lines up?

Unity is an 18-part crossover of the Valiant universe involving Eternal Warrior, Archer & Armstrong, Magnus Robot Fighter, X-O Manowar, Shadowman, Rai, Harbinger and Solar, Man of the Atom. The first month of crossovers featured covers by Frank Miller which all fit together to form a larger image, and the second covers by Walt Simonson which formed a larger image. Chapter One, Or Unity #0, was free and featured art by Barry Windsor-Smith; Chapter 18, Unity #1, was also by BWS. what i referred to as the "origin" of Magnus Robot Fighter where the chapters which revealed who his parents were and how he came to be raised by the robot 1A. 

In answer to your question, no, I don't think these are stories you need to seek out and read. Valiant was putting out some pretty good comics at the time, especially in the early days before Jim shooter was fired. I liked them then, but I have really grown to appreciate them even more now. The best Valiant series (IMHO) are early issues on Magnus Robot Fighter and Solar Man of the Atom. The origin of Solar. "Alpha & Omega" by Jim Shooter and BWS, was serialized in the first ten issues of the ongoing series. the center spread of each issue, when properly assembled, created the "world's largest comic book panel," some 26 x 51 inches. The story was eventually collected in tpb, but the final panel was omitted (in what i assume was a production error, because it's mentioned in the introduction). I also recommend Archer & Armstrong, but only the BWS issues.

CORRECTION: Yesterday I mentioned that The Original Turok Son of Stone #2 reprinted issues #1, 2 & 7, but that is incorrect. Those are the issues in the cover gallery section (plus #9). The actual stories reprinted are from #24 and #33. sorry for the confusion. I hope no one went out and bought them or ordered them online due to my error. :)

IRWIN ALLEN'S LOST IN SPACE: THE LOST ADVENTURES: This is my first time re-reading this series since it was first released in 2016. The television series came to an end after the third season, but Irwin Allen had already commissioned two scripts for the fourth from prolific television writer Carey Wilbur. Wilbur not only wrote for Lost in Space, but also for other shows including Rawhide, Bonanza, Wonder Woman, Hawaii Five-O and Time Tunnel. He also write the episode "Space Seed" for Star Trek, which some of you may be familiar with. The first script is psychological science fiction in which two aliens use John Robinson and Will as subjects in their experients. the second is more fanciful, in which Penny, Will, the Robot and Dr. Smith are transported to a dimension based on the collected works of Lewis Carroll. the stories could not be more different, not more representative of the final season of Lost in Space. Light-hearted fare.

NEXUS: ALIEN JUSTICE #1-3: Three more-or-less standalone stories connected by a common theme. In "Return to Thuneworld," Nexus takes his best friend Dave back to his home planet in search of his wife, only to discover that the Merk (the alien who supplies Nexus with his power) as suddenly and mysteriously cut it off. The Merk has, up until now, concerned himself only with the human race. Increasingly erratic, in issue #2 he divides his power among "Nexi" of four different alien races. Realizing his mistake, he dives his power among four unstable humans in #3. Nexus allies himself with another Merk, Gq, in order to defeat the Nexi and regain his title.

If you ever wondered who owns the hand-painted color page of #3, p. 15, it's me. I responded to an ad placed by colorist Les Dorscheid in CBG. All pages but six (of 44) were available, and I was able to buy my first choice. It features Nexus and Judah, in Nexus's space ship, in orbit of the planet Earth. the main panel (top) shows Earth, in all its glory, from space. I had the page professionally frame, with the acetate overlay showing the blacks, raised slightly above the painted page giving it a 3-D effect. Cool!

SOLAR - MAN OF THE ATOM: ALPHA & OMEGA: This is the tpb of the serialized origin story from Solar #1-10 I mentioned yesterday. It leads directly in to Solar #1 and Unity #0 as well. [<b>SPOILER</b>] The Black Hole which threw Phil Seleski into another reality was April 15, 1991; Erica Pierce arrived in that same reality on October 13, 1991; "Unity" begins April 4, 1992. [<b>END SPOILER</b>] Unity #0 (Chapter 1) and #1 (Chapter 18) make surprisingly good bookends to "Alpha & Omega" (all by Jim Shooter and BWS). For whatever reason (probably because of the BWS artwork), I also read Deathmate - Prologue. Avoid that Valiant/Image crossover series like the plague.

LOST IN SPACE: PROJECT ROBINSON #1: Innovation released an 18-issue (plus two annuals) Lost in Space sequel series back in the '90s. "Project Robinson" occurs between issues #12 and #13, Just as the Jupiter 2 arrives in the Alpha Centauri system at last. The series got as much wrong as it got right, but we need not go into that here. "Project: Robinson" #1 focuses on Maureen Robinson and is not exactly as I remember it. I remembered an issue-long flashback with a framing sequence, but actually the story flashes back between the present and the past throughout, the flashback sequences set against 1960s-80s rock and roll. This is one of the better issues of the series, if not the best, but don't go looking for the John Robinson-centric #2. I searched for it for years before learning it was never published. 

NEXUS: WAGES OF SIN: Another thematically linked series of four more-or-less standalone stories in which Nexus comes to terms with the new status quo under Gq. SIDENOTE: The businessman Vooper had been a behind-the-scenes figure since the beginning of the series, but Baron & Rude finally introduced him in the cast in the late First Comics days, giving him a huge shock of unruly hair atop his head. In "Wages of Sin," for whatever reasons, Rude decided to depict him as a Ross Perot lookalike.

CBG #1611: My favorite thing this issue was written by Craig Shutt, but it wasn't from his own column. A soon-to-be step-mom had written to "Oh,So?" to ask some pretty braod and generic questions about the JLA, and someone turned it over to Mr. Silver Age to Field. He wrote of multiple nieces and nephews who sought his expert opinion at family gatherings on matters super-heroic because he was the expert. It cracked me up to think of who would win in a fight between the Scarlet Witch and Batman.

GREEN LANTERN/GREEN ARROW: SPACE TRAVELING HEROES: When I was a kid, I had a couple of issues on Mike Grell's Warlord, but I didn't really become a big Mike Grell fan until the '80s with Starslayer and Jon Sable, Freelance. It was at that time that I first sought our and acquired the Mike Grell issues of Legion of Superheroes and Green Lantern/Green Arrow (still fairly inexpensive and readily accessible at the time). This new collection comprises issues #90 through #106, about half of which are by Mike Grell. (Denny O'Neil wrote them all, and Alex Saviuk penciled the non-Grell issues.) 

I remember really digging the Grell issues at the time, but I'n certain I've never read them since. I considered Saviuk's style "boring" at the time, but a quick flip-through now makes me wish more of today's artists had his panel-to-panel storytelling sense. I have no plans to re-read this one right now, but soon. I'll let you know.

Awesome Minds - COMIC BOOK CREATORS: This is a neat little book... not a comic book, but this thread is as good a place to post as any. It is written in a light, breezy style by Alejandro Arbona and crisply illustrated by Chelsea O'Mara Holeman. (No other biographical data available.) It's written with a juvenile/YA slant, but don't let that put you off. Arbona doesn't shy away from controversy; she doesn't point any fingers but she doesn't pull any punches, either. The book delivers a surprisingly complete history of the comic book field via biographies of the author's favorite creators. Hers, BTW, is Steve Ditko (although she makes it clear she doesn't share his philosophy or his politics). 

These are the chapters: Maxwell & Bill Gaines, Jerry siegel & Joe Shuster, Jack Kirby, Stan Lee, Steve Ditko, Osama Tezuka, Herge, Flo Steinberg, Will eisner, Marie Severin, Ramona Fradon, Christopher Priest, Tove Jansson, Rene Goscinny, Rumiko Takahashi, Hector German Oesterheld, Loise Simonson, Kelly sue Deconnick, Rius, Katsuhiro Otomo and Wendy & Richard Pini. If some of those names aren't known to you, perhaps you are familiar with their creations, such as: Astro Boy, Moomin, Asterix, Ranma 1/2 and Akira.

The first thing I noticed while perusing that list of creators is that there are more women than might be expected. The second thing I noticed was that there were quite a few international creators. Lastly I noticed that some of the American choices might not be the most obvious. Also, the author draws in many other creators as they become relevant to her discussion of the creator in questions.

What convinced me to buy the book was that there was a chapter about Flo Steinberg. (Id buy any book with a chapter dedicated to Flo Steinberg.) That, and the chapter about Herge. I have recently finished reading "The Complete Tintin" and my main complaint was that there was no information about the cartoonist or introductions putting the stories in historical context. Comic Book Creators accomplishes both of those things. 

Now, these are short chapters so they don't go into too much depth, but based on Arbona's treatment of topics I know very well, I trust what she has to say about creators I am wholly unfamiliar with (or only passingly familiar). Still, I learned at lest one thing I didn't know from every single chapter. For example, did you know that Flo Steinberg left Marvel in 1968 because she was refused a $5 raise? Unbelievable!

If there is a young reader who is interested in comics on your gift list or if you're looking for a little light but informative reading yourself, I recommend this book. (HC, $14.95)

NEXUS MEETS MADMAN: This one is almost too silly to read. A giant robot appears on Ylum, builds an amusement park and begins abducting children. Allusions to "The King" lead Nexus and friends to believe it is somehow associated with the "King of rock & Roll" but it turns out to be "The King of Pop." It's an odd experience seeing Michael Jackson's coffin in a comic released some 13 years before he died. Nexus tries to contact Badger in the past, but finds Michael Allred's Madman instead.

Oddly, although this one-shot features a character not owned by Baron & Rude, it is included in the "official" numbering. (Official = #88; Earth-J = #90.) It seems only the two Nexus/Magnus issues are not included in the official count, making my count and the official count off by two issues. That will later be reduced to one; keep reading.

SCOUT #8-14 "Mount Fire": In Comics Buyer's Guide #1610, Native American comic book dealer Jesse Jace wrote about the depiction of American Indian characters in a "Guest Shot" column. She was particularly harsh in her treatment of Timothy Truman's Scout, which she put in the shredder rather than selling it. CBG #1612 printed four letters about her column in "Oh, So?", one of which defended Scout vociferously. The letter writer cited Truman's Tecumseh graphic novel (which I have not read) as a "masterful approach to historical research and depiction in a comics format" in defense of his honorable intentions. That's exactly the same way I feel about Truman's biographical Simon Girty: Renegade. which i have read. 

Based on Jace's comments, I can only conclude that she read only the first issue of Scout and shredded subsequent issues she had already pre-ordered unread, because what she asserts Native America comics should be about is exactly what Scout is (which may not have been clear in the first issue, but certainly in the first storyline). It just doesn't make sense that a retailer would literally shred comics rather than sell them, but that is what she asserted she had done. That's why i think she shredded issues already ordered, then didn't order any more.

Some of these letter writers called on her for further comment; I'll report here if a letter of response is forthcoming.

SOLAR MAN OF THE ATOM - "Second Death": I re-read the Gold Key issues and "Alpha & Omega" every once in awhile, but it's been 17 years since I last read "Second Death" (the first four issues of the Valiant series). There are essentially two realities in the original VH1 universe (three if you count the Gold Key stories which exist in both realities as comic books). It was the creation of a black hole (on April 15, 1991) which destroyed the original universe and threw Phil Seleski into the past (September 27, 1990). His arrival created an alternate universe in which both "future" and "past" Seleski's existed simultaneously. The original's guilt over the destruction of his reality caused his mind to split and create a third, heroic persona based on his favorite childhood comic book character, Gold Key's Dr. Solar, Man of the Atom. Eventually, all three of these personas merged to created the Solar of the VH1 universe.

NEXUS: EXECUTIONER'S SONG: The first issue deals with Michana Loomis, the insane youngest daughter of one of Nexus' victims, who has desecrated his parents' grave site. she and her gang of teenage terrorists take hostage a tour bus driven by "Jackie Gleason" (as "ralph Kramden") with "Princess Diana" as tour guide. In the second issue, Nexus tracks down his father's superior officers. (Nexus' father was his first execution.) In the third issue, Nexus must confront Plexus, a human powered by a hitherto unknown third Merk named Kimbo. Plexus is the flip side of Nexus and stands for mercy and rehabilitation instead of execution. The final issue is an antic thing set against the backdrop of the 2496 Olympic Games held on Ylum. Nexus' daughters, Scarlet and Sheena, come by for a visit and one of them (we aren't told which, but I suspect Sheena) plants a spy device for the mother, Sundra's former mentor, Ursula X. X. Imada. Horatio and Sundra discuss having a child of their own. Not part of the official numbering is a short story from A Decade of Dark Horse #4 in which both Scarlett and Sheena are shown to rebell against their mother.

SCOUT: #15 is a fill-in drawn by Rick Veitch and Stephen Bissette in which Scout is held prisoner, drugged in an asylum. The art suits the story but is nevertheless something of a break in the flow, moreso than the fill-in by Tom Yeates between the first two storylines was. The character Monday the Eliminator is introduced in the main feature, and "The Swords of Texas" in the back-up (or "intermission"), with art by Ben Dunn. #16 is a 3D issue, never my cup of tea. Luckily not much happens this issue other than Scout and Monday escape from the asylum.

SCOUT: In #17, Scout and Monday make their way to Las Vegas. On the way, Scout hallucinates Larry Marder's "Beanworld" (!). The back-up story feature Missy and the New disciples of Soul (currently performing in Las Vegas), by Tim Truman and John K. Snyder III (a team used to better effect on Eclipse's The Prowler). Each story title is an old blues song, and on the letters page, Truman reveals which version of each one he likes best. In #18, Scout and Monday go their separate ways (temporarily), and Monday moves into the back-up slot, penciled by Flint Henry. [Henry went on to follow, (albeit not directly) Truman on Grimjack at First Comics, and he later did the similar Lawdog for Epic.] Scout meets up with Missy and we learn it has been three years since they last saw each other.

NEXUS: GOD-CON: Ylum plays host to several "gods" and/or their prophets: Jesus Christ, Mohammed, Buddha, Alvin, Elvon and others to debate the question, "How could a just God permit so much suffering and death?" (which they never do quite get around to answering, BTW). The series' inker, Gary Martin (a born-again Christian), had serious misgivings about the subject matter, but by the time he found out what it was, pulling out would have thrown the book off schedule. Editor Anina Bennet (an agnostic) allowed him to voice his objection on the letters page, and she herself supplied the rebuttal. when this series was first released (1997), I found the debate spirited and lively; now I find it tiresome. The story itself is philosophically entertaining and sparked more debate in the letters page of the second issue.

SOLAR: MAN OF THE ATOM #10-13: #10 is the one with the all-black cover (Valiant practically invented cover gimmicks, or at least popularized them). This issue had a small print run and is still expensive today, even as later issues reside in the quarter bin. It also features the first appearances of the Eternal Warrior and Geomancer Geoff McHenry. It begins on February 19, 1985 and quickly catches up to the present, showing what McHenry was doing on the significant dates in the Valiant dates I have mebntioned in previous posts. Issues #12 and #13 are parts of the "Unity" crossover (Chapters 9 and 17, respectively), with #12 bridging the gap from 1992 through 4001. 

I think I'm going to leave off reading old Valiant comics at this time. I got here on a tangent (Nexus to Magnus to Unity), but that's indicative of how I read. I'll continue read in Nexus and Scout. I don't recall ever discussing Scout on this board before (the series ended in 1989), but anyone who has read the series probably remembers where it's going and can probably guess why I'm reading it at this particular point in time.

CBG #1612-1613: I am always ready to revise/refine my view of comic books "Ages" in light of new evidence (or a new way of looking at the evidence). the "Guest Shot" in #1612 was given over to one Jerome Wenker, whose thoughts closely parallel my own and whose arguments I will be incorporating into my own definitions. (Whereas I am always willing to discuss Ages, I find that I am rarely ever eager to write about them.) In #1613, Dave Blanchard (who sees Ages not only as a a period of time in which comics were published, but also a style or writing or drawing) denotes the entry into the Silver Age of 24 titles published by National.

NEW FUN COMICS #1: As a side note, I have never been too interested in defining any kind of pre-Action Comics #1 "Platinum Age" or "Proto-Age" or whatever one wishes to call it. An example of "new evidence" such as I mentioned above would be actually reading an issue under consideration, case in point: New Fun Comics #1. I recently was given to opportunity to actually read it (thanks to DC reprinting it earlier this year) and have come to the conclusions that, while it is an historically significant publication in the development of the American comic book, it is not what i think of as a "comic book" per se

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