Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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Great advice, Clark! I'm a retired librarian who helped out with this problem all the time, and I couldn't have done better. I would add that a phone call to the local library might be able to resolve it without an actual visit.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Captain Comics said:

I haven't found a good place online to read EC and Fawcett, Doc, so I tried to sign up for this Hoopla of which you speak. Ran into a problem. My main library here in Memphis (where I have a library card) doesn't offer Hoopla, so my choices were two places in MIssissippi or one in Collierville. All three are small, and I wasn't sure they'd have what I wanted, so I tried for a bigger library. Tried Nashville, and sure enough, the main system had Hoopla.

But when I applied, it said there was a problem with my library PIN. I didn't know I had a library PIN! Is the problem that I don't have a library card with Nashville? Is it that my IP address is in Memphis? Has my library card expired somehow? I dunno. Advice?

Advice? Go sign up for a Nashville library card.

The Memphis and Nashville library systems may have a reciprocal relationship that would link the card you already have with the Memphis library system to the Nashville library system. But even if they don't, it's likely that you can get a Nashville library card even if you don't live there.

Regarding your PIN, yes, you have one, even if you don't know what it is. To find out what it is, the easiest way, I find, is to visit your friendly neighborhood library, show the card to your friendly neighborhood librarian, and ask.

The harder way -- although they always swear up, down and sideways that it's easy, I never find it to be so -- is to go online to your library's website, find the button that goes to your account, and go to your account. There should be a place for you to enter your library card number and your PIN. 

"But I didn't know I even had a library PIN!" you say. "How can I enter it?" (This is why I say this is the harder way.) I've found that the default PIN is something like your year of birth, or the last four digits of your library card number. (There might even be something on the site that specifically tells you which of those options work for that library system.) Try those.

If those don't work, use the link that allows you to reset your PIN. Then when you get locked out of your account, visit your friendly neighborhood library, show the card to your friendly neighborhood librarian, and ask him or her to unlock your account and reset your PIN.

Yes, I have done this lots of times. How did you guess? 

PICARD #1: A lot has happened during the “gap” between Star Trek: Nemesis and the upcoming Picard television series. This comic book series is supposed to be the “official” lead-in to it, but can a comic book ever be considered canon, really? There was a similar one which led into the 2009 Star Trek movie, but there are some differences between that and the opening of Picard #1. Then again, something like 20 years have passed, so that could account for the discrepancies, too. [BRIEF ASIDE: I read that series before I saw the 2009 movie. By the time I got around to watching it a second time, I misremembered the events of the comic book as being part of the movie.] The comic book quickly dispenses with “who’s doing what, where” and moves into the main plot. Still, I’m hoping a novelization of the pilot episode will flesh out the “missing” stories even more.

STAR TREK: YEAR 5 #8: the original series told with modern sensibilities. I can no longer pretend this is still strictly a 1960s pastiche. Also, this issue makes a few notable missteps with dialogue (Nurse Chapel referring to Dr. McCoy as “Bones,” for example) that I hadn’t noticed in the previous issues. Year Five is still well worth reading, however.

STAR WARS SAGA (comics primer): When Marvel Comics got the Star Wars license back a couple of years ago, I read the first several issues of each of the series. They were pretty good, actually, but frankly I wasn’t interested in collecting even one more new series at the time. Back on October 31st, I posted a question about the main series to the “Thoughts on these Comics?” discussion but received no response. As I understand it, every issue so far has taken place between “Star Wars” and “The Empire Strikes Back.” There is an omnibus of those issues (some of them, anyway), but the series is soon to be starting over with a new #1 set between “The Empire Strikes Back” and “Return of the Jedi.” I had been thinking about buying that omnibus, but this one-shot summary may have scratched that itch. Then again, it may have whetted my appetite. We’ll see.

Bwah-ha-ha!

My sister lives in Nashville. I think I'll see if she has a library card.

Also, just read Operation: Peril Vol. 1 collection (issues #1-4) from PS ArtBooks. Operation: Peril was a short-lived adventure series (16 issues) from ACG in 1950-53, with recurring features "Time Travelers," about a time-traveling couple; "Danny Danger," a private eye; and "Typhoon Thompson", a soldier of fortune in the South Seas. They are all uniformly silly and mediocre. The Typhoon Thompson premise is particularly risible(everyone in the whole South Pacific knows him/loves him/trusts him, all natives speak pidgin English and he is more a freelance crimefighter than merc), and his ladies-man schtick, so prevalent back then in James Bond-type stories, is actually repulsive in 2019.

ClarkKent_DC said:

Captain Comics said:

I haven't found a good place online to read EC and Fawcett, Doc, so I tried to sign up for this Hoopla of which you speak. Ran into a problem. My main library here in Memphis (where I have a library card) doesn't offer Hoopla, so my choices were two places in MIssissippi or one in Collierville. All three are small, and I wasn't sure they'd have what I wanted, so I tried for a bigger library. Tried Nashville, and sure enough, the main system had Hoopla.

But when I applied, it said there was a problem with my library PIN. I didn't know I had a library PIN! Is the problem that I don't have a library card with Nashville? Is it that my IP address is in Memphis? Has my library card expired somehow? I dunno. Advice?

Advice? Go sign up for a Nashville library card.

The Memphis and Nashville library systems may have a reciprocal relationship that would link the card you already have with the Memphis library system to the Nashville library system. But even if they don't, it's likely that you can get a Nashville library card even if you don't live there.

Regarding your PIN, yes, you have one, even if you don't know what it is. To find out what it is, the easiest way, I find, is to visit your friendly neighborhood library, show the card to your friendly neighborhood librarian, and ask.

The harder way -- although they always swear up, down and sideways that it's easy, I never find it to be so -- is to go online to your library's website, find the button that goes to your account, and go to your account. There should be a place for you to enter your library card number and your PIN. 

"But I didn't know I even had a library PIN!" you say. "How can I enter it?" (This is why I say this is the harder way.) I've found that the default PIN is something like your year of birth, or the last four digits of your library card number. (There might even be something on the site that specifically tells you which of those options work for that library system.) Try those.

If those don't work, use the link that allows you to reset your PIN. Then when you get locked out of your account, visit your friendly neighborhood library, show the card to your friendly neighborhood librarian, and ask him or her to unlock your account and reset your PIN.

Yes, I have done this lots of times. How did you guess? 

SUPERMAN: SECRET ORIGIN HC: This is a no-frills reprint of the 2009 reboot of Superman’s formative years by Geoff Johns and Gary Frank. I say “no-frills” because there’s no introduction and no extra features whatsoever. Each issue and two covers, and whereas both are reprinted, the main covers linked together to form a mural. I would have liked to have seen a fold-out of the mural, or at least a small-size reproduction across two pages.

CHOKE, GASP!: this collection has two subtitles:
    1) “The Best of 75 Years of EC Comics”
    2) “A Selection of Handpicked EC Comics Stories”
Of the two, I prefer the second. (The first makes it sound as if EC comics have been produced for 75 years, rather than five or six in reality.) The introduction is by EC fan/addict Grant Geissman and the stories are grouped alphabetically by artist. No story is conspicuously missing. If you are going to own only one collection of EC comics, this is the one to have.

SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN: This tpb collects “Lo, This Monster” and “The Goblin Lives!” from the first (and only) two issues of Marvel’s magazine-size Spectacular Spider-Man, the first in b&w the second in color. “Lo, This Monster” is pretty good, but “The Goblin Lives!” is my personal favorite single-issue Spider-Man story ever.

THE VALLEY OF THE WORM: This is a $1 “True Believers” one-shot reprinting Supernatural Thrillers #3 by Roy Thomas, Gerry Conway and Gil Kane. Apparently it’s going to provide the basis for the upcoming “Serpent War” in Marvel’s Conan. I have less than no interest in that, but I couldn’t pass up this vintage barbarian story (with a twist) that I’ve never read before. I wish I would have read more Robert E. Howard in junior high school than I did. I think I would have appreciated it more then.

BLACKSTARS #2: Described by series writer Grant Morrison as “a celebrity roast of modern superhero comics!” On Batman: “There was a time when they were robbing banks in elaborate animal masks or dumping hallucinogens in the reservoirs. These days? They’ve moved on from clever, imaginative crimes against the status quo to attacking him personally, over and over again. ‘Breaking the Bat.’” On superman: “When I left Earth, you were in jeans and a tee-shirt! As I hear it, history changes every few years these days.”

SHAZAM #8: Still in the “Wozenderland,.” Billy and his step-siblings are destined to rule one each, but the seventh member has yet to be found. He is revealed at the end.

LOIS LANE #6: An “Event Leviathan Aftermath” in which [SPOILERS] Lois deals with the death of her father [END SPOILERS]. This issue doesn’t have much to do with the five leading up to it.

BASKETFUL OF HEADS #2: Not my usual fare so I don’t really know what to say about it. I’m enjoying it so far, though.

X-MEN (1991) #1-3: In all the times I have re-read #1 over the years (and there have been several), I’ve read #2-3 less frequently. That’s because issue one was offered on slick paper with a fold-out cover. I read all three issues over the weekend, though, in what I call a session of “heavy reading.” [I had been reading the Jim Lee XXL X-Men which weighs 12.2 lbs. and, due to a recent surgery, I had been restricted from lifting anything over five pounds. (In comparison, a typical “Artist’s Edition” weighs 5.4 lbs.) But I digress.] I really don’t see how Hickman’s X-Men reboot accounts for stories like this, which springs from the fact that Moira MacTaggert tried to genetically manipulate Magneto’s mind when he was reduced to infancy following Defenders #15.

  • ...I seem to have lost a two-part, one part addition,  one part entirely new, thread.:-(

...SORRY I RUINED YOUR CHILDHOOD by Ben Zaehringer is a Berkeley Mews Comics/Andrews McMeel TPB of gag strips. Alt+weekly/Generation X/snarky joked, am I saying myself?.Well, the writer of descriptive copy at Amazon used the second of my descriptions above too (although adding the " " word, geneattionally-oriented, as well) so slack that up your Brady Bunch tattoos! Anyway, what I've seems funny, art style better than my descriptions above might suggest. He a pretty big deal to have his book stocked at Target?



Jeff of Earth-J said:

SUPERMAN: SECRET ORIGIN HC: This is a no-frills reprint of the 2009 reboot of Superman’s formative years by Geoff Johns and Gary Frank. I say “no-frills” because there’s no introduction and no extra features whatsoever. Each issue and two covers, and whereas both are reprinted, the main covers linked together to form a mural. I would have liked to have seen a fold-out of the mural, or at least a small-size reproduction across two pages.

CHOKE, GASP!: this collection has two subtitles:
    1) “The Best of 75 Years of EC Comics”
    2) “A Selection of Handpicked EC Comics Stories”
Of the two, I prefer the second. (The first makes it sound as if EC comics have been produced for 75 years, rather than five or six in reality.) The introduction is by EC fan/addict Grant Geissman and the stories are grouped alphabetically by artist. No story is conspicuously missing. If you are going to own only one collection of EC comics, this is the one to have.

SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN: This tpb collects “Lo, This Monster” and “The Goblin Lives!” from the first (and only) two issues of Marvel’s magazine-size Spectacular Spider-Man, the first in b&w the second in color. “Lo, This Monster” is pretty good, but “The Goblin Lives!” is my personal favorite single-issue Spider-Man story ever.

THE VALLEY OF THE WORM: This is a $1 “True Believers” one-shot reprinting Supernatural Thrillers #3 by Roy Thomas, Gerry Conway and Gil Kane. Apparently it’s going to provide the basis for the upcoming “Serpent War” in Marvel’s Conan. I have less than no interest in that, but I couldn’t pass up this vintage barbarian story (with a twist) that I’ve never read before. I wish I would have read more Robert E. Howard in junior high school than I did. I think I would have appreciated it more then.

BLACKSTARS #2: Described by series writer Grant Morrison as “a celebrity roast of modern superhero comics!” On Batman: “There was a time when they were robbing banks in elaborate animal masks or dumping hallucinogens in the reservoirs. These days? They’ve moved on from clever, imaginative crimes against the status quo to attacking him personally, over and over again. ‘Breaking the Bat.’” On superman: “When I left Earth, you were in jeans and a tee-shirt! As I hear it, history changes every few years these days.”

SHAZAM #8: Still in the “Wozenderland,.” Billy and his step-siblings are destined to rule one each, but the seventh member has yet to be found. He is revealed at the end.

LOIS LANE #6: An “Event Leviathan Aftermath” in which [SPOILERS] Lois deals with the death of her father [END SPOILERS]. This issue doesn’t have much to do with the five leading up to it.

BASKETFUL OF HEADS #2: Not my usual fare so I don’t really know what to say about it. I’m enjoying it so far, though.

X-MEN (1991) #1-3: In all the times I have re-read #1 over the years (and there have been several), I’ve read #2-3 less frequently. That’s because issue one was offered on slick paper with a fold-out cover. I read all three issues over the weekend, though, in what I call a session of “heavy reading.” [I had been reading the Jim Lee XXL X-Men which weighs 12.2 lbs. and, due to a recent surgery, I had been restricted from lifting anything over five pounds. (In comparison, a typical “Artist’s Edition” weighs 5.4 lbs.) But I digress.] I really don’t see how Hickman’s X-Men reboot accounts for stories like this, which springs from the fact that Moira MacTaggert tried to genetically manipulate Magneto’s mind when he was reduced to infancy following Defenders #15.

...What do you think I'd the place of " Lo, This Monster! " in Dpider-Man continuity against the 1972? ASM story arc that reprinted edited parts of it with new material to fit into Weird Age Marvel continuity? How do you reconcile them? I read the 1972 reworking first. This can be asked about the different version of Spidey'd origin in that story, too. For that matter, was the 70d Special that reprinted the Goblin story in any way changed from the first printing?

  I have a theory for " Lo..! ' myself.

...Regarding the '91 X-MEN #1, I was remembering this day how it did, despite what you might assume, come out on inbalk the different covers in newsstand accounts (Remember those?????) as well. Living in Green Bay, WI then, I bought 1 copy each of all 5 covers at my LCS...while at a newsstand/tobacconist downtown, which did have a nicely kept up comic book rack at back, each week's new cover came in week by week and took their place at. The top of the rack and the earlier ones all moved down a notch to lower , which was this store's at the comics spinner rack in general. - They received & stocked all five covers. I bought a copy of one of them too - Don't remember which - there for the heck of it, too. I was remembering today going to s club with one copy of that X-Men - Was it the newsstand copy? Maybe not totally sure.- and another book of comics material,c by Ace Backwords.

"How do you reconcile them?"

I go with the original placement... unless I'm reading only the run of issues of the regular title in which it was reprinted. As far as "Weird Age Marvel continuity" hurdles are concerned, this is a fairly minor one IMO.

SUPERMAN #18: So far, so good.

THE GOLDEN CHILD: It’s election time in the DKR universe. Any questions?

IMMORTAL HULK #28: I’m not enjoying this new story so much, but I am looking forward to next issue’s guest villain.

FIVE YEARS #6

FAR SECTOR #2

ARCHIE: 1955 #3: “Kid Diamond” is Little Richard.

DRAGONFLY & DRAGONFLYMAN #2

Jonathan Harris?

Jeff of Earth-J said:

IMMORTAL HULK #28: I’m not enjoying this new story so much, but I am looking forward to next issue’s guest villain.

...A belated thank you to Jeff, I'll say more later. (I don't know what turned on that " crossed-out " thing!!!!!

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