Lockjaw and the Pet Avengers #1, which was really good ("There will be no eating of teammates."), and G.I. Joe: Cobra #1-3. People who know me know that I don't just pick up and read a G.I. Joe comic. I've never been into them, and I was never even into the toys, really. But the guys on iFanboy really recommended this book, saying it doesn't feel like a Joe book at all. And it really doesn't. It's a lot more like a Queen and Country story. One of the guys (in the Hawaiian shirt) goes undercover, and it's an extremely good spy story so far. Cobra nor G.I. Joe (I believe) have never been mentioned in this book, but some of the characters have. VERY highly recommended!

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People care.  Maybe too much sometimes but people care.  I think marvel should be glad that after all they've done people can still get upset when they toss out something like Steve going evil.  After Tony Stark, Carol Danvers...  after repeated hero/hero battling storylines and characters acting like they'd never met or trusted each other, even after all that people still cared enough about the characters to be upset when yet another one was turned evil.  And then they dared speak out.  Truth to tell I didn't at the time, I just figured it was Steve's turn to go evil and I didn't think marvel would even take the effort to come up with a plausible reason.  As I recall I just shrugged and if given the issue for free I would have tossed it into the trash un-read.  That's what a modern marvel means to me these days, though I still enjoy the issues I collected up till about Avengers Disassembled.  Of the two which reactions do you think marvel would prefer?  Someone who cared enough to complain and at least looked through the issue or someone who just didn't care at all anymore? 

On shaky ground to post this, but it's Sunday and I'm tired so what the heck.

...ThAnk you , Richard ,.

  Could another factor , at least for DC , be that , as II assume you know , Warner Bros. spun off all their icky ld analo 20th Century print hooldiings into a sep

erate cmpany , Time Inc. , but I guess DC stayed with the main Warners company ? I guess selling print ads isnn.t something the  peple there would much think about or  know about ? Of course , though it was a DC thhat had  the 1 and only  outside ad...Fox/Murdoch likewise spun theiir  print holdings , including many Aussie and Brit newspapers , separately...Is the Sydney Morning Herald Murdoch-owned ? I sampled them some on the Web recently .

Richard Willis said:

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

I bought yesterday , aftter getting out of the hospital (on my birthday) for Congestive heart Failure.....

My Dad died of Congestive Heart Failure in 1963. Medical care was relatively primitive back then and having no health insurance didn't help. Take care!

The comment one of us made earlier about the disappearnce of outside advertissing from comics dooes seem to be pretty supported ,, actuall y ! I

I wonder if a big part of the reason is the small numbers of comics that sell today compared to the 60s and 70s? The advertisers don't see it as worth their money. Advertising on the Internet is probably cheaper and more effective these days. People looking for Marvel and DC figures and toys are more likely to see your ad on the Internet, since few of the movie-goers read comics.

....The above is m non-posted reply to Richard from yesterday I referred to above .
Re-opening my tablet to-dayy , I discovered it still there , tried too put it up again...ad it worked this time !!!!! Cherce :-) .

When they were growing the direct market I remember they kept advertising comics you couldn't get otherwise. I believe Ka-Zar was one of them.
 Richard Willis said:

The last I heard they were unwilling/unable to have a lower price for the online comics than for the same comic shop comics to keep the peace. I think they have to offer cheaper online comics that aren't in the comic stores, then later offer TPB collections in the stores. Otherwise I don't see how they will ever change anything.

Ronald Morgan said:

When they were growing the direct market I remember they kept advertising comics you couldn't get otherwise. I believe Ka-Zar was one of them.

The problem now is that they have non-returnable books. They expect the comic shops to buy them and take them to their graves. They can't make the same comic available cheaper and expect the comic shops to buy something they can't sell.

The latest Image Humble Bundle collection includes the first issue of Brandon Graham's Image comic magazine Island. I remember thinking it looked intriguing at the time, and since at least some of the content is done-in-one I thought it would be a more satisfying read than the average single issue. As a former hippie I was struck by the underground comix feel of a lot of it--as in wacky, surreal, and somewhat incomprehensible without the aid of certain controlled substances. (Actually probably incomprehensible then, too, but you didn't care). The strongest thing in it was Kelly Sue DeConnick's prose piece about her friendship with the late writer and poet Maggie Estep (with illustrations by Emma Ríos).  Ríos' own story kind of clicked for me, but none of the others did, although there was plenty going on visually. I would dip into some later issues to see how it evolves, but it was more miss than hit for me.

 

I read the latest two issues of Southern Bastards. This is one grim story, but very realistic.

There is one thing that keeps me from taking the back matter seriously, though. Jason Aaron addresses the readers like a football coach, or a guy pulling up a stool alongside you in a bar; "Happy damn New Year, you buncha bastards! On we roll," to quote the latest.

If you've ever heard Aaron interviewed on a podcast, just hearing his voice would tell you that he would be the last person to ever speak those words aloud. He sounds pretty timid, honestly. It shows that the whole persona he takes on in the letter column is just an act, so it rings hollow.

That's a very nit-picky thing to say about a great comic, and I don't want to over-shadow how awesome the work of art itself really is.

My copy of the Civil War II trade arrived.
I felt I'd read the main points in the various crossovers I've already finished. (Inhumans, Ultimates, even Cap A Steve Rogers) and I've never been a fan of Bendix.
My expectations were low.
It is actually better than I expected, beautiful and consistent art with some fairtfairtly consistent characterisation too. For once not everyone sounds and speaks the same.
Marvel needs to move quickly on now but maybe consider this again if you had discounted buying it.

Deathstroke #11: This was a done-in-one story written by Christopher Priest with art by Denys Cowan (!) and Bill Seinkiewicz (!!!). This honestly felt like an old issue of Green Arrow, The Question, or even Hellblazer. It was about some mothers in Chicago who hire Deathstroke to put an end to gun violence in their neighborhood. This is a really powerful story that takes many twists and turns and is just so old-school in every good possible way. Highly highly recommended to anyone who lived in the time when the aforementioned stories titles were at their best.

The Few #1: This was a double-sized Image title by Sean Lewis and Hayden Sherman. This is about a few people in an America where the water is limited and the only states are the "Remainder States". I love the art here by Sherman. It reminds me a lot of Ashley Wood mixed with some Eric Canete. This book was pretty good, and I will read the next one just to see what happens.



Wandering Sensei: Moderator Man said:

Deathstroke #11: This was a done-in-one story written by Christopher Priest with art by Denys Cowan (!) and Bill Seinkiewicz (!!!). This honestly felt like an old issue of Green Arrow, The Question, or even Hellblazer. It was about some mothers in Chicago who hire Deathstroke to put an end to gun violence in their neighborhood. This is a really powerful story that takes many twists and turns and is just so old-school in every good possible way. Highly highly recommended to anyone who lived in the time when the aforementioned stories titles were at their best.

 


I liked this one too. Posted a little bit about it in the favorite things thread. Great story!
I've read dotted LEGION #36 and #39 for podcast purposes, and it's fair to say this wasn't the book's golden period. In my memory, Barry Kitson's art always looked wonderful, but poor inking in one case, and dull colouring in the other makes the art look terribly so-so. And Alan Grant rally didn't give much quarter for non-regular readers, there's very little in the way of context.

I've still to read #43, whose cover may be a homage to JLA #170... I'd show you but I still don't know how to upload covers via iPad. Mind, I didn't read that one today!

Nailbiter Vol. 3: Blood in the Water
Joshua Williamson (Writer); Mike Henderson (Artist); Adam Guzowski (Colorist); John J. Hill (Letters & Book Design)
Image Comics, 2015

The series definitely gets back on track with this collection. Rogue NSA Agent Nicholas Finch opens the story torturing the infamous serial killer Edward "Nailbiter" Warren to uncover the secrets of Buckaroo. Turns out that Warren has been investigating the question himself--going back to high school when he was dating the current sheriff, long before he became a serial killer. Warren reveals that the Aztec-looking statues are all of recent vintage; they're a red herring. As he is showing the secrets of the underground tunnels to Finch and Sheriff Shannon Crane, they are attacked by mysterious hooded figures. Maybe those figures are the secret of the serial killer plague. They certainly seem to be responsible for Detective Eliot Carroll's loss of limbs. He's the guy who got Finch to town by asking for his help. Oh, and he finally awakens from a coma at the end of this arc. Expecting some real answers in the next installment.

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