Lockjaw and the Pet Avengers #1, which was really good ("There will be no eating of teammates."), and G.I. Joe: Cobra #1-3. People who know me know that I don't just pick up and read a G.I. Joe comic. I've never been into them, and I was never even into the toys, really. But the guys on iFanboy really recommended this book, saying it doesn't feel like a Joe book at all. And it really doesn't. It's a lot more like a Queen and Country story. One of the guys (in the Hawaiian shirt) goes undercover, and it's an extremely good spy story so far. Cobra nor G.I. Joe (I believe) have never been mentioned in this book, but some of the characters have. VERY highly recommended!

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The Flintstones #7-8: In wonderful and unimagined ways, this book takes on consumerism, family relationships, civilization, and kindness in such an entertaining way. I love this book so much.

Planet of the Apes/Green Lantern #1: Robbie Thompson and Justin Jordan bring a really fun story to life with art by Barnaby Bagenda (of Omega Men!). There is a little bit of dialogue in here about how much simpler it was before everything in the GLs' world became centered around the Rainbow Lanterns. I wish they would give the different color corpses a year off to see what can be done without them.

Justice League of America #1: This one has pretty art, but I was bored. The "gathering of the team" had members go from "no way" to "okay" in a couple pages, and it really just didn't do anything for me. More power to anyone who is excited for this book, but I'm not following it any further.

The Wild Storm #1: This was fun and cool and stylish, even though it was almost entirely talking heads. It will be interesting to see how many of the members of that old universe (which merged with the DCU before being extracted once again) pop up here. There are a few strange bits--Jacob Marlow isn't a little person anymore, although he does look like he's relatively short, and some personalities have been altered, like the Engineer. Seeing as how these were--I believe--Warren Ellis's creations, it's fun to see them re-imagined by him. He said in an interview that the DCU would still have "hooks" in this world, even though it's separate. It is true. It will be interesting to see if we get any sort of crossover in a couple years time.

Deadly Class #26: Well, this issue certainly turned everything on its head! I really need to do a re-read of this title up to this point and post about it here.

Shadows On the Grave #1: Richard Corben has got to be getting up there. He did work for Warren back in the 1970's and his art looks the exact same as it did then. It's wonderful. This is a book full of short stories by him, and they are as eerie as anything he has ever done. Short, simple tales of horror, and they are all on par with those old horror books. Wonderful stuff.

Deadly Class #26: Well, this issue certainly turned everything on its head! I really need to do a re-read of this title up to this point and post about it here.

Wow, I thought issue #21 turned everything on its head! That's the last issue in the aptly-titled Die For Me collection.

I'm reading the Force Works collection.

90s excesses at their height but actually much better than I remembered and could quite easily be published alongside the current Marvel stuff.

I see Corben has also been adapting some Lovecraft stories.

Yes, he has. I haven't even read any of those, either. I have read a lot of his work, but none of that. His Creepy volume from Dark Horse (or is it Eerie?) is a great cross-section of his best work that I've read.

Ronald Morgan said:

I see Corben has also been adapting some Lovecraft stories.

Uh, yeah, it happens again. Great work by Rick Remender and Wes Craig.

Mark Sullivan (Vertiginous Mod) said:

Deadly Class #26: Well, this issue certainly turned everything on its head! I really need to do a re-read of this title up to this point and post about it here.

Wow, I thought issue #21 turned everything on its head! That's the last issue in the aptly-titled Die For Me collection.

ODY-C, Vol. 2: Sons of the Wolf
Matt Fraction (Writer); Christian Ward (Illustrator)
Image Comics, 2016

I'm still not completely sure what to make of this. Ward's art is wildly inventive, while Fraction's writing seems a bit stilted. Largely written in faux-classical epic poetry style, but with occasional (often shocking) lapses into modern jargon. It's sometimes hard to read, but more importantly, I find it hard to follow. There was never any question what was going on in a given scene, but the overall narrative is often unclear. This arc is about Ene the Conqueror, and He, of Troiia, after the end of the Troiian War and their departure for home. There's lots of godly interference, as well as humans generally behaving badly. He and his young ward hit upon a Thousand Nights solution when threatened with death on their wedding night. They tell the two kings a story with such a great cliffhanger that the kings pardon them--so no one in the kingdom dies that night. That's a pretty cool conflation of different myths, and is the sort of inventiveness that might bring me back for another installment.

Lobster Johnson, Vol. 3: Satan Smells a Rat
 Mike Mignola (Writer), John Arcudi (Writer), Kevin Nowlan (Illustrator), Sebastian Fiumara (Illustrator), Wilfredo Torres (Illustrator), Tonci Zonjic (Illustrator), Joe Querio (Illustrator), Dave Stewart (Colorist)
Dark Horse Comics, 2014

The Lobster returns, in a collection of mostly one-shots (one was a two-parter). There's not a weak story here, despite the brevity and the variety of artists. I especially liked "Caput Mortuum" (art by Tonci Zonjic) about a Nazi plot to poison the entire city of New York with poison gas, distributed from a zeppelin; and the title story (art by Kevin Nowlan) about an evil scientist grabbing bums off the street for medical experiments. The Sketchbook notes in the back say that Zonjic had become the defining Lobster Johnson artist, but I would cheerfully take Nowlan's artwork on every story. He has a lovely fine line--especially strong in drawing facial expressions--but he also gets the horror atmosphere right. And let's not forget the killer monkeys in "A Scent of Lotus:" no Mignola collection would be complete without a surreal touch like that.

"The Case Batman Failed to Solve!!!" (Batman #14, December 1942/January 1943)

Over the years, I've collected a fairly ridiculous collection of ... um ... collections of Batman stories.  I decided that starting on January 1, I'd start reading them in chronological order.  At least a little bit every day.  I'm up to early 1943 and well into material that I've never read before.  I really enjoy this era of Batman.  Personally, it doesn't bother me a bit that it's mostly run-ins with clever thugs.

Thanks to the Archives, I'm good up to around 1946.  Spotty after that, but I seem to have at least a few stories from every calendar year thereafter.

CREEPY: I started reading Creepy yesterday, with the intention of reading the entire series (as reprinted by Dark Horse to date). I started this project one before, but couldn't remember where I left off, so I started over at the beginning again.

Jeff, The Creeps Magazine has just started to be distributed by Diamond, and looks like it is a direct descendant of old EC Comics like Creepy and Eerie. I'm going to check it out, and if you like those old horror comics, I would suggest you do the same!
 
Jeff of Earth-J said:

CREEPY: I started reading Creepy yesterday, with the intention of reading the entire series (as reprinted by Dark Horse to date). I started this project one before, but couldn't remember where I left off, so I started over at the beginning again.

What exactly happened to that company that was making new Creepy and Vampirella comics?

Warrant Publishing? Awful close to Warren. The implication is this is Uncle Creepy but he's unable to be called that or look like he used to anymore. Some complicated copyright problems?

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