Lockjaw and the Pet Avengers #1, which was really good ("There will be no eating of teammates."), and G.I. Joe: Cobra #1-3. People who know me know that I don't just pick up and read a G.I. Joe comic. I've never been into them, and I was never even into the toys, really. But the guys on iFanboy really recommended this book, saying it doesn't feel like a Joe book at all. And it really doesn't. It's a lot more like a Queen and Country story. One of the guys (in the Hawaiian shirt) goes undercover, and it's an extremely good spy story so far. Cobra nor G.I. Joe (I believe) have never been mentioned in this book, but some of the characters have. VERY highly recommended!

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Philip Portelli said:

Golden Eagle was an orphan that Hawkman gave Thanagarian technology to because....reasons!

I'm not familiar with Golden Eagle, but in the Silver Age the Thanagarian Hawks were so concerned about their technology falling into Earthling hands that they used ancient weapons instead of rayguns.

Thanks, Philip! Honestly, one of my very first comic books was a Secret Origins annual which focused on the Teen Titans history. I knew about Herald, Bumblebee, Golden Eagle, and Flamebird from there, but this was the first time I think I had seen them in "official" action. Plus, it was almost 30 years ago. It's funny, though. I remember looking at those characters in awe, and thinking they were so cool. If they actually were cool, this wasn't the showcase to display it!

Philip Portelli said:

To Wandering Sensei,

Re: Titans West

These were Post-Crisis versions of the Teen Titans West that appeared in Teen Titans #50-52 (O-D'77).

Flamebird was the first BAT-GIRL, Betty Kane who was the niece of Kathy (Batwoman) Kane.

The Herald was MAL DUNCAN who also went by both THE GUARDIAN and HORNBLOWER (don't ask!) and he and Bumblebee were not part of the TTW but the Teen Titans East!

Golden Eagle was an orphan that Hawkman gave Thanagarian technology to because....reasons!

With Hawk, the first Dove, Lilith, Bat-Girl and Golden Eagle, there was also BEAST BOY but of course in 1990, he was part of the New Teen Titans as CHANGELING though today he's back to being Beast Boy!.

The Golden Eagle first appeared in Justice League of America #116 (Ap'75) as "The Kid Who Won Hawkman's Wings!" This was when Hawkman had resigned from the team and returned to Thanagar in JLA #109. Charley Parker was a 16 year-old orphan in Midway City who idolized the Winged Wonder and even created a makeshift costume to play as him.

He was transformed into the Golden Eagle with real wings and powers by the subconscious mind of the Matter Master who was frustrated that Hawkman had left before he could kill him with his latest grand scheme and thus created a replacement! The JLA helped Charley survive this and took away his powers.

Only for him to reappear two years later in Teen Titans #50 with wings, anti-gravity belt and outfit provided by Hawkman and implying a mentor relationship that we were never shown!

You're welcome, WS! That Secret Origins Annual gave the Post-Crisis history of the Teen Titans and focused heavily on Nightwing and the Herald, IIRC.

Actually I don't remember it quite well but will bet you a dollar that it skipped over who Wonder Girl was and where she came from!

Though I do recall them retelling the part where the future TT members battle their JLA elders and Wonder Woman was replaced by Martian Manhunter!

Being one of my first comics, I just remember being exposed to a whole lot of characters who were new and fascinating to me. I don't remember whether Wonder Girl's origin was a part of this or not, but I do know that this was about the time that the "Who Is Donna Troy?" story line came out in New Titans. The fact that her story was in flux at the time would probably explain her being glossed over in Secret Origins.

Philip Portelli said:

Actually I don't remember it quite well but will bet you a dollar that it skipped over who Wonder Girl was and where she came from!

I can sum Hawkworld up in five words: “Should have been an Elseworlds.”

I skipped the 1990 Adam Strange series when it was initially released. I laterbought it at aq quarter sale but still haven’t read it.

I read Mage: The Hero Denied #0 over the weekend, too. That’s another series (two, actually) that I own but have not read. (I used to have a job that kept me too busy to read comics, but not too busy to buy them.) I read a whole lot this weekend, though, including…

TIME²: The American Flagg! Special that introduced the milieu was the first comic I ever took notes on to figure out. After having read so many other Chaykin comics over the last 30 years (not to mention the last couple of weeks), I found it much easier to follow this time around. I sure wish I still had those notes for reading the two graphic novels that followed, though. It was supposed to have been a trilogy, but the third part was never released. What I couldn’t understand at the time was why Chaykin didn’t come right out and say Time² was located in (or at least accessible though) the pan-dimensional city of Cynosure. But I’ve heard that rights to that particular intellectual property are one of things making future editions of GrimJack problematical, perhaps setting Time² apart was a wise thing to do. (Not that he’s done anything with it in the years since.)

MIDNIGHT MEN: This was Howard Chaykin’s contribution to EPIC’s “Heavy Hitters” line. (Anyone remember those?) Like so many of Chaykins features, he tells the origin and then abandons it. This one has call-backs to his Atlas/Seaboard series Scorpion (which laterr became Dominic Fortune at Marvel). When the [let us say] “Silver Age” Dark Angel is killed, the “Golden Age” one passes the mantle to the modern one. This concept had real potential, but no stories beyond the original four-parter.

It strikes me that Chaykin’s version of The Shadow (a series I have no plans to re-read any time soon) was continued as a series, but by other hands. Other than that, American Flagg! and American Century (which Chaykin did not draw), most of Chaykin’s creations never go past the origin phase.

I also kept busy reading the latest Carl Bark Library volume of “Uncle Scrooge” (a series I am caught up on and plane to keep it that way), Marvel’s Monsters, the Brave & the Bold Omnibus and Buck Rogers comic strips.

How was the Brave and Bold Omnibus? I am kinda reading those (but clearly not all) in the Batman Jim Aparo volumes.

This morning, I read a good chunk of an omnibus of my won, Jack Kirby's Fourth World Omnibus Vol. 2. First of all, what a head trip. I kind of expected that, but man, it somehow always surprises me. I have owned this series in its entirety for years now, but I hadn't read past the first volume. I love Kirby's art more every time I see it. I'm going to commit heresy and say that I even like it when Vince Colletta inks it. (It pre-reminds me of Keith Giffen.)

Man, the way Desaad psychologically tortures the Forever People with that messed up roller coaster was enough to give me nightmares. We get stories of Jimmy Olsen fighting the Loch Ness Monster (called something else, of course) with the Newsboy Legion, Orion, Mister Miracle, and Barda in quick succession here. The ideas famously fly at you fast and furious. Wow.

"Pre-reminds," eh? Interesting.

Yeah, that Fourth world stuff is a trip. I enjoy it more every time I read it.

"How was the Brave and Bold Omnibus? I am kinda reading those (but clearly not all) in the Batman Jim Aparo volumes."

To tell you the truth, I was in the mood to read some Batman a while ago and decided to read the three Aparo volumes. To get a "running start" at it, though, I decided to back up to the B&B Omnibus. (Aparo's tenure starts toward the end.) I'm enjoying the B&B Omnibus so much that, when I finish, instyead of moving on to the Aparo volumes, I may back up and read the Teen Titans Omnibus.

I like Colletta's inks over Kirby too. There's an upside and a downside. He can be smushy, and he did erase stuff when doing Thor. (I don't have information on whether he did when doing New Gods. Kirby was the editor, so maybe not.) But he adds an element of naturalism, and I like the way he handles Kirby's wild shadows. The combination works for me.

Preminds? Retro-minds?

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Pre-reminds," eh? Interesting.

I defend him based on the fact that he was the go-to guy when they wanted inking done fast.

Luke Blanchard said:

I like Colletta's inks over Kirby too. There's an upside and a downside. He can be smushy, and he did erase stuff when doing Thor. (I don't have information on whether he did when doing New Gods. Kirby was the editor, so maybe not.) But he adds an element of naturalism, and I like the way he handles Kirby's wild shadows. The combination works for me.

Jeff of J, your talk about Jim Aparo got me searching my shelf with all my Tales of the Dark Knight, etc. hardback volumes based on the artists. This got me side-tracked when I saw my Marshall Rogers hardback. Instead of JK4W Vol. 3, I'm now reading some Marshall Rogers/Steve Engelhart Batman stories...

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