Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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That book came out the year I graduated from high school. It was bicentennial-mania!

I remember -- was in first grade at the time, but the celebrations made a big impression. Living so close to Philadelphia, I suspect it was even more intense than in other places. I remember being upset that I probably wouldn't see the tricentennial! 

Biggest disappointment of the bicentennial? At the Independence Day parade, I got stung by a bee. My mom told me we were going to get first aid. Having never heard the term, I thought I was getting a drink like lemonade. 

I'm here to tell you all that FIRST AID IS A LIE.

...BATMAN #53 (yes, late)
NIGHTWING #48
JOURNEY INTO MYSTERY THE BIRTH OF KRAKOA #1
Parts of:
B&V FRIENDS #264
MARVEL COMICS DIGEST #7

Someone should market "First Ade".

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

I remember -- was in first grade at the time, but the celebrations made a big impression. Living so close to Philadelphia, I suspect it was even more intense than in other places. I remember being upset that I probably wouldn't see the tricentennial! 

Biggest disappointment of the bicentennial? At the Independence Day parade, I got stung by a bee. My mom told me we were going to get first aid. Having never heard the term, I thought I was getting a drink like lemonade. 

I'm here to tell you all that FIRST AID IS A LIE.

The most painful thing to me about the bicentennial was Elton John's "Philadelphia Freedom." HATED that song, and it was on the radio* all the ding-dong time.

* There was a time in America when, if you weren't at home with your component stereo system (required to be cool) and vinyl collection, called "records" or "albums," you had to listen to whatever was playing on the two or three radio stations that weren't all sports, easy listening or Country-Western. And what was on those stations was whatever the radio stations were paid to play determined to be most popular, the Top 10 or Top 20. Memphis did have one adult contemporary FM station, which was the default. When FM 100 played something awful, you had to root around on AM 56 or 68. My transistor radio -- Google it -- didn't have an FM dial, so I was restricted to AM when not in the car.

Sometimes all three were playing something awful. I remember the Top 10 on FM 100 -- don't think it was national -- consisted of 10 songs I hated. They included three Elton John songs ("Philadelphia Freedom," "Island Girl" and "Don't Go Breakin' My Heart" with Kiki Dee), a Leo Sayer song (which I don't like by definition), a Barry Manilow song (ditto), and "Afternoon Delight" (which I thought for the longest was by Captain and Tennille, a band I didn't like, but was by Starland Vocal Band, which is apparently another band I don't like).

Yes, the music was so traumatizing in the '70s that I haven't forgotten any of it. The '70s haunt my nightmares.

The only commemorative issue of anything I managed to obtain during the bicentennial was Time magazine's, which was written as if the signing of the Declaration of Independence was a recent news event. Wish they would reprint it, because I have absolutely no idea where my copy disappeared to after all these years.

Years later I managed to find a copy of DC's Superman Celebrates the Bicentennial, but that turned out to be reprints of either Superman time traveling back to the 1770s or Tomahawk stories.

With newsstand distribution as spotty as it was back then, never saw the Jack Kirby Captain America tabloid beyond house ads in other Marvel books of the day. Especially in light of recent comments here, wish I could find an affordable/readable copy of it, but considering back issue prices on anything by Kirby...

And Captain, in my humble opinion, radio stations haven't had much improvement in the years since...

The treasury story has been reprinted in a couple of collections. It's also available digitally.

The Captain America by Jack Kirby: Bicentennial Battles trade from 2005 has the story and the middle issues from Kirby's 1970's Captain America run. I thought it included the treasury's one-page "posters" ("A Colonial Captain America!" etc.), but the GCD seems to indicate otherwise.

So you aren't a fan of Almost Famous, I take it.

Captain Comics said:

Yes, the music was so traumatizing in the '70s that I haven't forgotten any of it. The '70s haunt my nightmares.

The Lone Ranger #1 from Dynamite.

I bought this one because I like what I have read from Mark Russell. He writes and Bob Q draws it. This may actually be the first Lone Ranger comic I have ever bought, other than the Planetary issue which was an obvious pastiche. I’m not sure what to think about this. It may be just a thing of the times, but the bad guys in this issue seemed to be based on Donald Trump and company.

But I may be thinking that because every bad guy seems to be that these days, and I honestly can’t tell which ones are actually based on him, and which ones are just original bad guys. There is at least one image that is clearly based on Donald Trump’s arrogant smile.

There is the whole “barb-wire fences” thing so representing the border walls, the white man saying that we will be much better off if each segment of the population stays in its proper place, which is sad but true.

Still, I’m not sure how much of this is historical accuracy and how much of it is a thin veil.

I come strongly from the left, but I don’t want something that is portrayed as history but is just the current climate with other clothing on. I don’t need any more of that. That’s why I read comics for--so that I don’t have to deal with that for fifteen minutes.

Everafter Vol. 2: The Unsentimental Education
Dave Justus & Lilah Sturges, writers; Travis Moore, artist (issues 8-12); Mark Buckingham, artist (issue 7); Michael Wiggam, colorist
Vertigo Comics, 2017

The second (and final arc) of Everafter features a new Fable: wizard Bobby Strickland, the first human Fable. The Prologue--with comfortably familiar art from Fables veteran Mark Buckingham--tells the story of how young Bobby brought down a warlock in possession of Baba Yaga's chicken-legged cottage while still a young student of the witch Totenkinder. The "education" of the title refers to three high school students who get their hands on magical objects. When a jock begins his usual bullying, the three nerds react with a show of power that terrorizes the school, slaughtering many of the students. One of them surrounds the school with a magic cube, isolating it in its own pocket dimension. That becomes the central saga, as literally thousands of years pass inside the cube. Meanwhile the rest of the Shadow Players deal with some magical difficulties in the real world, including Texas legends like the Chupacabra and the ghost La Llorona. After the crisis is resolved, the story goes in to fast forward for a rushed conclusion. It laments all of the stories that will not be told, and it's true: in different times there is no reason why this series could not have gone on for much longer. There was no lack of story potential, or creative talent.

Lee: Just out of curiosity, who listens to radio? I have satellite in my car and use Spotify or YouTube at home when I don't bother with CDs. I haven't listened to a song I don't like or a deejay in decade or so. Surely These Kids Today(tm) don't listen to radio. When I try to imagine someone listening to radio I get an image of some old fart with Rush Limbaugh in the background. Who's the audience?

Sensei: Never saw Almost Famous. Is it any good? Obviously, an entire decade can't suck 100 percent. There was plenty of stuff that came out of the decade that endured and some that has become classic. But the banal horror of  the basic day-to-day of the '70s so overwhelms my memories that people have to remind me of this or that song, movie, TV show or comic book that was technically from the '70s but was really good. I mean, I went to school in electric blue herringbone pants and disco was popular.

I think of things like Star Wars (1977) or Superman: The Movie (1979) as anomalies, not as representative of the era. Ans surely the fashions haven't survived. If leisure suits ever make a comeback, I will become a hermit.

I listen to radio, albeit the local Music for the No Longer So Young as They Used to Be station.

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