Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

Views: 44882

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I remember "The Adventures of Luke Skywalker" tagline, too. Then again, George Lucas would later say the movies were really about Darth Vader so more books about Luke might have been originally planned then dropped.

STRANGERS IN PARADISE: FIVE YEARS #1: The world is on a five year countdown to Armageddon. Given that Strangers in Paradise XXV #10 started the clock, I thought this series might skip ahead to “five years later,” but no, it picks up immediately after SiP #10 and will apparently chronicle those critical next five years. It’s a good jumping on point for new readers (Terry Moore does a good job of recapping SiP XXV), but you’re going to want to pick up the collection of the previous series after reading #1 of this one.

Just read The Green Lantern #7, which had fun with the idea that Myrwhydden has been trapped in Green Lantern's ring since sometime in the Broome/Kane days.

Actually, that doesn't make sense, because Hal's ring isn't the original -- not only was the original destroyed sometime in the '80s or '90s (which should have destroyed Myrwhydden), but his replacement ring has also been destroyed, and currently Hal doesn't have a physical ring: He creates a light construct ring out of will power. I'm not sure he even needs a ring any more, as he exerts the green energy by his will alone and may be completely made up of the stuff. I don't remember the details, so someone who has read Green Lantern more closely than me can correct me. Morrison seems to be writing the book as if that stuff didn't happen, it seems to me.

I also don't remember the original 1960s Myrwhydden with any detail, either, so if Morrison made some clever bits riffing on it, they were lost on me.

It was a cute story, and it's no surprise that the manifestation of the ring's AI is a hot chick. I don't know if that's Hal's idea or the ring's idea of what Hal would want, but either way it makes sense.

I also read The Wild Storm #1-13, which is a sort of parallel-world take by Warren Ellis on the original Wildstorm Universe, which is ironic, given that Ellis was one of the original architects (with his take on The Authority). We're getting alt-versions of the Khera/Daemonite conflict, most of the members of The Authority (who are not yet a team), most members of the WildC.A.T.s, and so forth. There are some missing, and some new guys I haven't seen before. This version is far more coherent, with more characters sharing origins, than before. That keeps a more coherent narrative, which is a singular one in which three different factions (I.O., Stormwatch and a group of outsiders headed by Emp) heading for a showdown. I'm engaged, but had to quit because I don't have The Wild Storm #14. Since the DC Universe service has the series up to #12, I'm hoping that they'll be up to #14 in two months which, coincidentally, is when the 24th and last issue of The Wild Storm will ship. So maybe I'll finish up then.

It's not like I have a dearth of stuff to read in the meantime. I feel overwhelmed most of the time!

GREEN LANTERN #7: This issue reminded me very much of Alan Moore’s “weird art” issue of Swamp Thing. Some of what I was going to say has been rendered inert by Cap’s post above (which also makes me think I didn’t get everything from the story I should have), so I’ll leave it at that.

PAPER GIRLS #28: This comic issue is unique. Full stop. The girls have become separated in time and space, and their stories are told in four tiered “widescreen” panels per page. The script is structured in such a way that it can be read front to back across each tier or in the conventional sense. In other words, panel one of page five (let us say) leads not only into panel two of page five, but panel one of page six. Similarly, panel three of page eight leads into both panel four of page eight as well as panel three of page nine. And so on. It reminds me somewhat of the “poster” issue of Alan Moore’s Promethea (him again), which could be read as a comic book or as a double-page poster. I would recommend Paper Girls #28 to anyone interested in experimental storytelling (but if you’re not reading the series regularly, boy are you gonna be confused!).

OTHER: Every once in a while I throw myself into a second or third tier series and just read it. Sometimes it is a series I’ve read before, other times not. I’ve been in the mood to do that again, but I’m having trouble deciding which series to read. Over the weekend I read the first issues of Speedball, New Warriors, Star Brand, Quasar and Nova.



Captain Comics said:

I also read The Wild Storm #1-13, which is a sort of parallel-world take by Warren Ellis on the original Wildstorm Universe


I've been enjoying this one as well. And not only does it feature newer (and better) versions of these characters, but the spinoff Michael Cray (Deathblow) series features alternate versions of various DCU characters.

IIRC, Marv Wolfman said that he was going to kill off Myrwhydden during the Crisis but didn't. He would have been a perfect choice but no, let's take out Mirror Master and Clayface instead!

I've been reading this series in collected form (like everything else), so I am really looking forward to encountering this issue.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

PAPER GIRLS #28: This comic issue is unique. Full stop. The girls have become separated in time and space, and their stories are told in four tiered “widescreen” panels per page. The script is structured in such a way that it can be read front to back across each tier or in the conventional sense. In other words, panel one of page five (let us say) leads not only into panel two of page five, but panel one of page six. Similarly, panel three of page eight leads into both panel four of page eight as well as panel three of page nine. And so on. It reminds me somewhat of the “poster” issue of Alan Moore’s Promethea (him again), which could be read as a comic book or as a double-page poster. I would recommend Paper Girls #28 to anyone interested in experimental storytelling (but if you’re not reading the series regularly, boy are you gonna be confused!).

STAR BRAND: When Marvel started up their “New Universe” in 1986, I decided to try one (one issue, not one series). I chose Star*Brand by Jim Shooter and John Romita, Jr. It was all right, kind of derivative of Green Lantern, but nothing I needed to collect. When John Byrne took over I bought his first issue (#11), but by #12 I had lost interest. Back in the ‘90s, my then-LCS opened up its legendary back room for a quarter sale. Among many (many) other comics, I bought the remaining issues of Star*Brand (the series lasted 19 issues plus one annual) but never read them.

Over the weekend I read the “Milestone” edition of issue #1, then remembered that #11-19 were included in one of the John Byrne “omnibus” editions. His first issue was typical Byrne: he took the concept, distilled it to what worked and threw away the rest. I don’t know if it was by accident of design (because I still haven’t read them), but issues #2-10 were rife with inconsistencies. I do know that Shooter and Romita didn’t stay on the title all that long, but I lost interest and dropped the series with issue #12.

It changed radically after that. I’m not going to go into depth about a series that 30+ years old unless someone wants to discuss it, but a lot of the groundwork for themes Byrne would later explore in John Byrne’s Next Men was laid here. It also foreshadowed the dark TV miniseries Torchwood: Miracle Day as well as developments in other comics series such as Miracleman and Maximortal. The series became dystopian after the city of Pittsburgh was destroyed, but Byrne pulled it out of its depressing downward spiral by the last issue.

MARVEL BOY: Last night I read the Marvel Boy stories from Marvel Boy #1-2 and Astonishing #3-5. This short run of issues illustrates a phenomenon of 1950s era comics in general (and Marvel comics in particular) in which a title would morph from genre to genre (in this case, super-hero to science fiction to horror) casting about for an audience. The last time I read this run I followed it into Agents of Atlas; this time I intent to follow it into Quasar.

I'm pushing my way through the three Abe Sapien HCs. The art is very good, but it's just ... boring. I'm waiting for a hook to explain why these stories were published. It's just Abe wandering around the apocalypse (so rousingly depicted in the simultaneous B.P.R.D. volumes) wondering what his connections to the frogs is, if any. 2.5 books in and we still have no answer, and nothing much has happened except Abe wandering from one survivor town to the next. Even the supporting characters come and go with no real resolution. (Or no resolution that I care about.) Maybe some of you got more out of them than I did.

FANTASTIC FOUR #164-165: I followed 1950s-era Marvel Boy up with his modern appearances (now called “The Crusader”).

MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE #53-58: After that it was “Project Pegasus” featuring his successor. I remember how I came to read this the first time. When I was in college, I picked up a lot of 1970s series had missed as backissues, and I followed Deathlok from Astonishing Tales into Marvel-Two-In-One. I thought it was okay at the time, strictly by the numbers, kind of perfunctory. I still feel the same way.

MMW SHE-HULK Vol. 2: Another series I read for the first (and only) time as backissues in college. It didn’t make much of an impression on me, and I eventually traded it. I buy all the Masterworks, even if I don’t plan to read them right away. I always read the introductions the day I buy them, though. Most often MMW editor Cory Sedlemeyer hires the writer or artist or editor associated with the series to write the introduction, in this case, David Anthony Kraft. I’ll admit, I missed a lot of what he was trying to achieve my first time through. DAK was never a favorite of mine, but his introductions make me look forward to re-reading his series.

JMS SPIDER-MAN OMNIBUS: J. Michael Straczynski wrote 44 issues of Spider-Man, 38 of them drawn by John romita, Jr. and six by Mike Deodato. They are all collected here: #30-58 & #500-514. He wrote a lot of really good issues (including the 9-11 one), but it’s “Sins Past” I tend to remember him for. That pretty much ruined Spider-Man for me, but I must not judge his entire run by that one story. I don’t usually have such knee-jerk reactions, but I have tried from time to time to read Spider-Man since the one/two punch of “Sins Past” and “One More Day,” but I am simply no longer interested. I would be happier with this collection if it contained only the Straczynski/Romita issues.

I liked the GL Myrwhidden story -- but then again, I'd expected Myrwhidden to reappear a year or so ago, in Dan Jurgen's story that ended the Green Lanterns title, in which a villain had "hacked" the power rings and power battery. I was so hoping it was Myrwhidden, but it turned out to be Cyborg Superman. Oh, well... I'm glad to see him back now.

I just read the debut of Man-Bat in Detective Comics 400, reprinted in the Detective Comics hardcover. I'm surprised I've never read this one before -- I didn't realize that Langstrom really wasn't presented as an antagonist for Batman at all in this initial story... by  the end of it, it would be just as likely that he'd become a partner or sidekick. 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2019   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service