Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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Picked up all three TPBs for David Lapham's Young Liars series.  Attempted reading volume 1, but couldn't finish it.  Lapham is really spastic with this series.  YL might feel different for if I was reading it month-to-month, but collected together it reads too crazy.  Not sure I can continue with vols. 2 or 3,but I should try.

Last night, I dove into the newly arrived copy of Hook Jaw.  Like Lapham, Pat Mills is one of my all-time favorite comic scribes.  His stories can be downright silly, but never dull.  Hook Jaw is a great white shark embodying not so much a tyrannical fish, but an ecologic force of nature breaching the surface to give Man his comeuppance.  He roams the ocean with a perpetually protruding harpoon prominent from his jaw. 

Scratchy artwork by several Spanish artists, Hook Jaw is a lot of good humor and gore fun.  I'm enjoying it more than I did his dinosaurs and cowboys series, Flesh: the Dino Files.

I intended to reread Young Liars after the big Stray Bullets project. I was buying it in trades at the time. I don't remember really liking it, but I liked it enough to keep with it to the end. Something else I should revisit!

My brother from another mother! I bought Hook Jaw about a year ago out of an interest in expanding my British comics reading beyond the 2000AD world. It's only been a year, but this post makes me want to go back and read it again. I loved it.

Also, I have copies of other trades in that ilk, The Leopard of Lime Street and El Mestizo, but I haven't read either of them yet, but I am anxious to dive in. I've also been meaning to get the three volumes of Misty off of my Amazon wish-list, so I may have to do that before long too. I bought a Halloween issue of Misty a couple years ago and found myself exposed to a whole new world of comics that have been there all along, but unbeknownst to me.

Let's talk!

Jonan Jello said:

Last night, I dove into the newly arrived copy of Hook Jaw.  Like Lapham, Pat Mills is one of my all-time favorite comic scribes.  His stories can be downright silly, but never dull.  Hook Jaw is a great white shark embodying not so much a tyrannical fish, but an ecologic force of nature breaching the surface to give Man his comeuppance.  He roams the ocean with a perpetually protruding harpoon prominent from his jaw. 

Awesome.  Never heard of Misty, Leopard of Lime Street nor El Mestizo, but I will definitely check them out fully at some point.  Browsing a bit, El Mestizo* looks pretty good! 

Used book stores in the late 90s got me hooked on a bunch of 2000AD characters: Rogue Trooper, Nemesis, ABC Warriors, and Slaine the Berserker.  (Reading these titles, I quickly realized in high school I had been exposed to Mills before in Marshall Law and Metalzoic!) One of my all-time favorite comics story is Slaine's Sky Chariot story arc that spans a dozen or so progs. 

* I dig westerns and DC Comics war comics. A couple of excellent European westerns I read in the last few years was Bouncer by Jodorowsky and Boucq and Gus and his Gang by Chris Blaine.



Wandering Sensei: Moderator Man said:

My brother from another mother! I bought Hook Jaw about a year ago out of an interest in expanding my British comics reading beyond the 2000AD world. It's only been a year, but this post makes me want to go back and read it again. I loved it.

Also, I have copies of other trades in that ilk, The Leopard of Lime Street and El Mestizo, but I haven't read either of them yet, but I am anxious to dive in. I've also been meaning to get the three volumes of Misty off of my Amazon wish-list, so I may have to do that before long too. I bought a Halloween issue of Misty a couple years ago and found myself exposed to a whole new world of comics that have been there all along, but unbeknownst to me.

Let's talk!

Jonan Jello said:

Last night, I dove into the newly arrived copy of Hook Jaw.  Like Lapham, Pat Mills is one of my all-time favorite comic scribes.  His stories can be downright silly, but never dull.  Hook Jaw is a great white shark embodying not so much a tyrannical fish, but an ecologic force of nature breaching the surface to give Man his comeuppance.  He roams the ocean with a perpetually protruding harpoon prominent from his jaw. 

Still catching up from last week…

ARCHIE ’55 #1: the story begins with a framing sequence set in 1960. A woman is being interviewed by Mr. Grange, editor of The Capital Courier. His question: “Whatever became of Archie Andrews?” The main story is a flashback. One year after they graduated, Archie, Reggie and Jughead play the Spring Fling dance at Riverdale High School in 1955. Principal Weatherbee has a strict rule: “No sex music.” The kids are bored. Archie’s band fires off an R&B song for their last number. Out in the parking lot after the dance, local DJ Rick Sterling offers to put a demo of theirs on the air. Back at home, Archie’s parents advise caution: “Dream big but stay grounded.

The next day at Pop’s Choklit Shoppe, the kids are still abuzz with the excitement of that last number. Pop’s jukebox is broken. Across the street, Veronica Lodge approaches her father about a business deal. That night, Archie and his (unnamed) black friend go to a club called the “High Note” on “the other side of the tracks” where they see Big Earl Dixon (a Chuck Berry type), “the biggest act on Checkers Records” perform, and Archie’s life is changed. The following day, Archie skips band practice and plays guitar in his room while listening to records by Big Earl Dixon, The Trends, The Five Crowns and The Four Stars.

Mark Waid and Bryan Augustyn nail the ‘50s as accurately as they nailed the ‘40s in the previous series, and I’d buy anything draw by Tom grummett. So far, Archie ’55 is a bit roman a clef, like Howard Chaykin’s Hey, Kids… Comics! It’s fun guessing who’s who. I like this new Archie brand, in which the timeless characters are put into a multiplicity of situations. The first issue of this series had callbacks to movies such as Back to the Future and Animal House (to name but a few), but these familiar elements are combined in new ways.

Recommended.

I've been curious about Hook Jaw since I first heard about it. It's on my list now.

And while Archie 1941 was predictable, that's to be expected when covering familiar movie/comics ground and it was executed so well I didn't mind. You say Archie '55 is of similar quality, so I'm on board.

Clearly, I'm going to have sacrifice something as my reading list grows. Sleep, perhaps.

I think you'll like it. I just watched Jaws last night, which makes me all the more ready to go back and re-read this.

Captain Comics said:

I've been curious about Hook Jaw since I first heard about it. It's on my list now.

I read Year of the Villain: Sinestro last night. It was written by Mark Russell and drawn by Yildiray Cinar. This was a very interesting one-shot that plays out as a reflection of our own lives through micro-organisms who live for about 2 microseconds.

This definitely makes the most out of the one-shot format of these books. I think this is the first one I've read, although I do know I own a few more.

BRONZE AGE BOOGIE #6: My favorite of the AHOY! Comics titles.

SHAZAM! #7: Late. Not Doomsday Clock late, but late nonetheless. The "next issue" blurb has me intrigued: "Shazam meets Captain Marvel?"

JIMMY OLSEN #3: The cover blurb ("Who Shot the Decoy Corpse of Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen?") is one of eight interconnected vignettes this issue. 

STAR TREK: YEAR FIVE #6: An alien device renders the entire crew partially telepathic just in time for an encounter with (movie era) Klingons.

MARVEL COMICS PRESENTS #9: Only two stories this issue. The first is the conclusion of the Wolverine serial running since issue #1. As it any continuity problems this decades-spanning story may have presented, they go back in time and prevent the story from happening in the first place. the second story features a "cyber" version of Wolverine called "u/Wolverine"...? Whatever.

I also read FIVE YEARS #4.

I am way far ahead in my “project” reading, yet way far behind in my project posting, so I’ve been reading some things “just for fun.”

MARVEL MYSTERY COMICS #82: First appearance of Namora (not mentioned to be Namor’s cousin)

SUB-MARINER #50-55, 57: First Namorita.

Plus the Sub-Mariner “origin” series of back-ups from the Atlas era, which pre-date MMC #82, in which Namora is Namor’s cousin.

I just reread Namora's first appearance in Marvel Adventures Giant-Size Avengers #1. She certainly had good reasons to battle evil and I too was surprised that she wasn't said to be related to Namor. When did that happen? With Namorita;'s debut?

She was supposed to be on par with Subby yet be the damsel in distress at the same time. And she became Betty Dean's roommate! If she was intended to be a romantic interest, that would have gotten awkward fast!

I really liked the bad guys calling Namor "The Fish"! 

Jeff of Earth-J said:

I am way far ahead in my “project” reading, yet way far behind in my project posting, so I’ve been reading some things “just for fun.”

MARVEL MYSTERY COMICS #82: First appearance of Namora (not mentioned to be Namor’s cousin)

SUB-MARINER #50-55, 57: First Namorita.

Plus the Sub-Mariner “origin” series of back-ups from the Atlas era, which pre-date MMC #82, in which Namora is Namor’s cousin.

"When did that happen?"

It was in place by the 1950s run. Whether or not it was established in later issues of Marvel Mystery Comics I cannot say, as few of those issues have been reprinted.

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