Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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ABSOLUTE SWAMP THING by ALAN MOORE v1: I have these stories reprinted in color, in black and white, and I have the originals. The comics in this large, HC slipcase edition have been completely recolor and the art looks phenomenal. Seriously, I have never seen colors like this in a comic book before. The cloth-bound cover has a unique feel to it, too.

LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE v16: This volume goes into 1953. I am only at 1939 in my reading project, so I have a ways to go. But every time a volume of the “Classic Comics Library” comes out I think of IDW’s financial woes. Selfishly, I worry that series such as Little Orphan Annie, Li’l Abner, Dick Tracy and Steve Canyon might not see completion. as Little Orphan Annie along has 15 years to go.

MARVEL MASTERWORK PIN-UPS: Several weeks ago I posted some thoughts on a new book titled “80 for 80” which reprinted a single image for each year of Marvel’s existence. Although I pre-ordered them both, this is the book I thought I was reading. This is a Craig Yoe collection which reprints every significant “Marvel Masterwork” pin-up from the ‘60s, plus some from the ‘70s and ‘80s as well. We’re talking pin-ups from individual issues, Fantastic Four annuals, Spider-Man annuals and the like. No real surprises here (maybe a few), but it really is cool to have these all, large and on archival stock paper.

I wanna see "Absolut Swamp Thing".  "Yeah, I'm th' plant elemen'al, whasha gonna do about it? Hic!"

Jeff of Earth-J said:

ABSOLUTE SWAMP THING by ALAN MOORE v1: I have these stories reprinted in color, in black and white, and I have the originals. The comics in this large, HC slipcase edition have been completely recolor and the art looks phenomenal. Seriously, I have never seen colors like this in a comic book before. The cloth-bound cover has a unique feel to it, too.

LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE v16: This volume goes into 1953. I am only at 1939 in my reading project, so I have a ways to go. But every time a volume of the “Classic Comics Library” comes out I think of IDW’s financial woes. Selfishly, I worry that series such as Little Orphan Annie, Li’l Abner, Dick Tracy and Steve Canyon might not see completion. as Little Orphan Annie along has 15 years to go.

MARVEL MASTERWORK PIN-UPS: Several weeks ago I posted some thoughts on a new book titled “80 for 80” which reprinted a single image for each year of Marvel’s existence. Although I pre-ordered them both, this is the book I thought I was reading. This is a Craig Yoe collection which reprints every significant “Marvel Masterwork” pin-up from the ‘60s, plus some from the ‘70s and ‘80s as well. We’re talking pin-ups from individual issues, Fantastic Four annuals, Spider-Man annuals and the like. No real surprises here (maybe a few), but it really is cool to have these all, large and on archival stock paper.

Getting back to the subject of black and white reprints for a moment. Jim Aparo's art looks great that way, especially when he inked himself.

Joe Kubert and Jack Kirby's also.

For Curt Swan while the pencil talent is always there, IMHO he always looked best in black and white reprints inked by Murphy Anderson, although there was at least one Superman short story where Swan inked himself that was fantastic too visually.

Why Swan didn't ink more, let alone his own work, is unknown to me.

Picking the first 6 issues up on Comixology  in a recent sale I've just read issues #1-#3 of the new 'The Green Lantern" and well, it's kind of okay but so far I'm not blown away by anything radical.

Sorry to hear that. I liked it a lot. I'm a big fan of Morrison, though, and I'm happy to see his work being weird and underrated, to be honest. I like to think he has a big enough following by now that he's not hurting financially.


Richard Mantle said:

Picking the first 6 issues up on Comixology  in a recent sale I've just read issues #1-#3 of the new 'The Green Lantern" and well, it's kind of okay but so far I'm not blown away by anything radical.

Lee Houston, Junior said:

Why Swan didn't ink more, let alone his own work, is unknown to me.

I wonder if the page rates were lower for inkers and it was a monetary decision? More likely it was the editor's choice. "Work for hire" creators couldn't assign themselves work.

The three most important Hulk comics of the last 30 years:

“That stony law I stamp to dust; and scatter religion abroad to the four winds as a torm book, and none shall gather the leaves.” – Wm. Blake, A Prophecy

I tried my best to catch up on new comics I had been neglecting to read for the past month before their respective next issues begin to ship this week.

INVADERS #11: Captain America and Sub-Mariner stranded together on an island. (Namor is human at this point.) If this comic was nothing more than talking heads while Cap and Subby hash out their differences, then that would be enough. But this issue intersperses flashbacks (continuity implants) to just after the events of Avengers #4 and also lots of action. At one point, Cap loans Subby his shield. Wow. Possibly my favorite individual superhero comic of the year. I wanted to standi up and cheer.

FLASH FORWARD #2: the main action takes place one Earth-23, the one in which a black Superman is President of the United States. (NOTE: “Oval Office of Solitude.”) Also involved are the Retaliators of Earth-8 and the Zen Man. Last page cliffhanger: Wally’s children Jai & Iris!

SUPERMAN’S PAL JIMMY OLSEN #4: I look forward to shelving a tpb of thise series next to “The Amazing Transformations of Jimmy Olsen” and the Jack Kirby collection.

LOIS LANE #5: Hard core journalism 101; the kind of story we need now.

STAR TREK: YEAR FIVE #7: If you like the TV show, you’ll like this.

THE ORIVILLE #4: If you like the TV show, you’ll like this.

That’s as far as I got and I still have four recent comics yet to read.

(Namor is human at this point.)

Huh? Namor has always been half-human. When was he human?

Black Stars Above 1: A post-Civil War story about fur trappers. A girl’s parents are very overbearing, and she takes her chance to get out by taking a job from a stranger to deliver a package for him. Honestly, I thought at the beginning of this story it was going to be a horror story like The Witch. Yes, the setting is 200 years apart, but they you have to admit that the 1600’s country life and the 1800’s country life aren’t all that different on the surface. But instead of being about evil spells or something like that, it takes a cosmic-ish turn and the horror comes down from above.

The artistic setting here is remarkable. You get the browns and grays of fall, and the tall tree trunks and the feeling of desolation that practically make you smell the smoke from the fires that were so crucial to them during those days. You feel damp and cold. 

The writing on this book is by Lonnie Nadler, whose name I didn’t know, but I am pretty impressed with his work. The art here is by Jenna Cha, who sets a gothic tone without it looking supernatural. Sure, the story is supernatural, but it is set in a very real time and place. 

This is from Vault Comics.

Lee Houston, Junior said:

Getting back to the subject of black and white reprints for a moment. Jim Aparo's art looks great that way, especially when he inked himself.

Joe Kubert and Jack Kirby's also.

I've been looking at pages of Tony de Zuniga's original art from Jonah Hex (inking over Dick Ayers) and Arak. It's just wonderful in B&W.

For Curt Swan while the pencil talent is always there, IMHO he always looked best in black and white reprints inked by Murphy Anderson, although there was at least one Superman short story where Swan inked himself that was fantastic too visually.

My recollection is Neal Adams has observed Swan's Superman was muscular but also a bit chunky, and some of his inkers lost the muscle, so he made a point of making him lean. I can see what he was talking about. I think George Klein lost it. Anderson and Bob Oksner really kept it.

I never failed to enjoy Murphy Anderson's art, whether he inked his own pencils or someone else's.

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