Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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Couple things over the weekend:

Shutter, Vol. 1: Wanderlost is a very creative combination of sci-fi and fantasy; I can't think of anything else quite like it. I'll probably do a review thread later.

Murder Me Dead: A Harrowing Tale of Love and Murder is David Lapham's free-standing noir miniseries, recently reprinted. Similar to Stray Bullets in tone, but this is a tightly plotted thriller. Lapham really shows his storytelling chops here.

Man, I loved me some Murder Me Dead. I also loved the t-shirt he put out at the time, everyone else loved it too. Unfortunately, I lost that shirt at a party I wanna say around '02

Mark Sullivan (Vertiginous Mod) said:

Couple things over the weekend:

Shutter, Vol. 1: Wanderlost is a very creative combination of sci-fi and fantasy; I can't think of anything else quite like it. I'll probably do a review thread later.

Murder Me Dead: A Harrowing Tale of Love and Murder is David Lapham's free-standing noir miniseries, recently reprinted. Similar to Stray Bullets in tone, but this is a tightly plotted thriller. Lapham really shows his storytelling chops here.

Ha! I know of at least two favorite shirts I've lost that way. Part of youth, I suppose.

Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) said:

Man, I loved me some Murder Me Dead. I also loved the t-shirt he put out at the time, everyone else loved it too. Unfortunately, I lost that shirt at a party I wanna say around '02

Saucer Country Vol. 2: The Reticulan Candidate collects issues #7 - 14, completing the run of this Vertigo series. One of the perils of trade-waiting: I read the first volume about two years ago, then completely forgot to look out for the second one (the series had already been cancelled, so I was expecting one more to wrap things up). I went back and skimmed the first volume, since it had been so long. I like the series, but I can see why it may have been a hard sell. The core story is about politics--but then there are also three different theories about the reality of UFOs, with all the attendant conspiracies to hide them. By the end we know that some faking is going on, but not everything. The cancellation does seem to have had an impact on the storytelling: the story abruptly jumps from the primary campaign to the Presidential election. But that arc gets three issues, so it doesn't feel rushed.

Cornell said that he'd be taking Saucer Country to another publisher after his Vertigo contract expired. I don't think that ever happened, but I was looking forward to more.

My other weekend reading: Zander Cannon's Heck, which I started reading when it was part of the e-comic experiment Double Barrel. By the time I downloaded the first two issues of Double Barrel the project had completed its run, and collections of the two main stories had been announced, so I decided to just get my hands on those. It's a quirky story about a guy who inherits his father's house and discovers it contains a portal to Hell. So he goes into business visiting the departed to settle inheritance disputes. When he accepts a contract from his high school crush he learns surprising things about her, and about himself. It's drawn in a deliberately sketchy, fast style, but is nonetheless both suspenseful and heartfelt.

I've read the first bits of Heck, and have the rest in Double Barrel. I liked what I've read a lot, and need to get to the rest of it!

One thing I meant to mention. When Heck got collected the electronic (and print, from the look of it) version was reformatted. It's now in landscape format, which read better on my 7" Kindle Fire than the standard format used in Double Barrel. Not a big difference if you have a larger tablet, I imagine.

I posted what I read of Secret Wars in that thread, but I also read Star Wars #8. This was Stuart Immonen's first issue, and man, it was beautiful. I knew this would look perfect, but there is something about seeing it with your own eyes that just makes it look incredible. He has the ability to draw likenesses without them looking traced for painstakingly worked-over.

This issue was like what I was saying about Archie the other day...it's awesome-looking, reads very smoothly, filling, and yet it's over before you know it.

This weekend I read a Jonathan Hickman creator-owned miniseries that I completely missed, both when it was monthly and collected. Secret, Volume 1: Never Get Caught (with artist Ryan Bodenheim) is a relatively traditional format for Hickman, a spy thriller. A bit confusing at first, filled with significant events and characters we don't know yet. But it all comes together pretty quickly. The conclusion is exciting, and mostly satisfying.

Also dipped into one of my Humble Bundle eComics. Clive Barker's Hellraiser: The Dark Watch Vol. 1 by Clive Barker & Brandon Seifert, with Tom Garcia (Illustrations). Works pretty well if you're a fan of the movies, although the storytelling is a bit choppy. It's also nowhere near self-contained, ending in a cliffhanger. I've got the second volume as well, so I know I can get at least that far.

 

I read two Gilbert Hernandez books.

The first was Speak of the Devil. This was a strange story about a peeping tom who everyone believes is a man, wearing a devil's mask. As you might have guessed, it turns out the peeper is actually a female. In fact, it's a local gymnast on her way to the state finals. This is a story of family relations as well as teenage dynamics, and, well, things take bizarre dark turns more and more as the story progresses. It reminds me in many ways of Stray Bullets, but that may be more because of the line work than the actual story, although the story is serious in tone as well. I would recommend this one to fans of Vertigo (ahem, anyone know any of those?).

Likewise, but not quite as dark, Bumperhead is the story of a young man everyone calls Bumperhead, apparently because he has a large forehead. It's not like a mutant forehead, it seems more like he just has a high hairline. Anyway, that has very little to do with this story which spans pretty much the entirety of a man's life. It focuses a bit more on his youth and the painfully awkward bits of puberty and death. This is a good one. I actually liked this a bit more than Speak of the Devil.

Fans, of course, of Love and Rockets would really like these books. If you've never checked out L&R, I would still recommend these books to fans of quirkier books that don't take a turn into the abstract.

Time for an update.

SUB-MARINER : I’m on MMW Vol. 4.

PHANTOM: I’m on Charlton Vol. 1 (Vol. 4 overall).

NOT BRAN ECHH: About halfway through. This is a slow trudge. Just not funny.

E-MAN: I usually re-read these (the Charlton run, at least) once a decade or so, and it’s been about ten years since I last re-read the pre- and post-First Comics runs. A newly revitalized First Comics has recently released a tpb collecting all of the early material. I loves me some E-Man.

AVENGERS: When I was finished reading E-Man, I was still in the mood for Joe Staton artwork, so I re-read “The Celestial Madonna” story (which will also supplement Richard Mantle’s Avengers discussion elsewhere in this forum).

JUPITER’S CIRCLE / LEGACY: I read the original limited series plus the prequel back-to-back, but I will likely discuss them in more depth in a thread of their own.

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