Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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(T)homas (A) (S)wift's (E)lectric (R)ifle. They missed an opportunity to do something educational there.

THE WALKING DEAD: The last time I tried to get caught up on TWD comics (prior to season seven), I left off with HC volume 11, issue #121. But when I tried to pick up where I left off, it was in the middle of a story, so I backed up a bit to volume 10, issue #109, which is roughly analogous to the just-completed TV season seven. Now I’m ready to move forward with volumes 11-13.

FRANKENSTEIN ALIVE, ALIVE!: Only three issues were published in three years (and none since 2014), but man was this a good series! I just read it now for the first time in one sitting, and only the second time ever. I read it partly in conjunction with this “Frankenstein phase” I’m going through now, and partly in tribute to Berni Wrightson. Nobody could do as good of a job as Wrightson, but I wouldn’t mind seeing this series continue to find out where the story would have gone. See “A Cover a Day” for an image of issue #3.

Low Vol. 3 - Shore Of The Dying Light
Rick Remender, writer; Greg Tocchini, artist; Dave McCaig, colorist
Image Comics, 2016

Stel Caine finally achieves her dream: she rises to the surface of the Earth, the first human to do so in thousands of years. There she finds that life has continued to evolve, as if humanity had never existed. The surface is a harsh place, but it is not a wasteland. Her daughters are not far behind her, although they have picked up a new ally who may not be what she seems. I have seen comments saying that not enough happens in this collection, but it seems pretty action-packed to me. It ends with cliffhangers about the fate of Stel, her daughters, and the mission to find a new home for humanity. Very anxious to see how it all turns out in the next volume.

I need to get caught up on Low. It is definitely one of Rick Remender's lower-profile books, but I love the sci-fi of it, and the art is breathtaking.

Mark Sullivan (Vertiginous Mod) said:

Low Vol. 3 - Shore Of The Dying Light
Rick Remender, writer; Greg Tocchini, artist; Dave McCaig, colorist
Image Comics, 2016

Stel Caine finally achieves her dream: she rises to the surface of the Earth, the first human to do so in thousands of years. There she finds that life has continued to evolve, as if humanity had never existed. The surface is a harsh place, but it is not a wasteland. Her daughters are not far behind her, although they have picked up a new ally who may not be what she seems. I have seen comments saying that not enough happens in this collection, but it seems pretty action-packed to me. It ends with cliffhangers about the fate of Stel, her daughters, and the mission to find a new home for humanity. Very anxious to see how it all turns out in the next volume.

Captain America Steve Rogers v2 The Trial of Maria Hill

Considering we all know that the destination of this storyline is the upcoming Secret Empire event, I was wondering how interesting this book would be - but it is all about the journey . There are some surprising beats here, involving Maria Hill, Sharon Carter and chiefly Cap himself that I won't spoil. The depth and the layers of Political shinanegans that the creative team are building here is actually genuinely fascinating and it does feel like 'evil-hero' is getting a fresh spin here.
If you are unsure about picking this up, thinking you know where this story is going - take another look, the getting there is a classy ride.
Highly recommended.

DOC FRANKENSTEIN: For my money, one of the best uses of the Frankenstein Monster in comics. Unfortunately, this series lasted only six issues. It’s hard for me to believe it came out 12 years ago already! See “A Cover a Day” for the cover of the first issue.

THE WALKING DEAD: I couldn’t remember where I had left off reading TWD, so a few weeks ago I backed up and began with HC v10. I have now re-read v10-11 and moved on to v12 (#133-144). I now know I previously left off with v11, so I’m now reading v12 for the first time. I’m looking forward to seeing how this plays out on TV next season.

Concrete Vol 1: Depths - I never really got Concrete. It was something that would pop up in Dark Hirse Presents every once in a while, or a mini-series would come out, but I was never interested. I did always like Paul Chadwick's art. Well I picked up this book pretty cheap last year, and finally dove into it. While I won't say it converted me into a Concrete fan, I think I get it now, and appreciate it for what it is. This a lot of the early stories that came out back in 80s, including his origin. Good not great comics. but with terrific art.

I read Batman #433-435, the arc called "The Many Deaths of Batman". This came out back in 1989, and I had bought them off Comixology last year and finally got around to reading them. It was written by John Byrne and drawn by Jim Aparo. Many of the people who trained Bruce Wayne while he was working toward becoming Batman are being killed off one by one, all of them dressed up as Batman. This was a fun, old-school late Bronze Age story by a classic Bronze Age team. You don't always get a pure Batman-as-detective story, but this case was very heavy on the detective side. We also get some good Commissioner Gordon and Alfred assistance as well. I believe this was during the time after Jason Todd but before Tim Drake, so Batman was the only one in a costume here, and he needed those civilian helpers.

Godshaper #1: This one comes from Boom Studios, and it was very interesting. I liked it. It's kind of hard to describe, but I'll do my best. Everyone in the world has their own personal god with some kind of power. Well, everyone except one in 10,000 people, who are known as shapers. This is the story of one particular shaper who seems to have a little god of his own anyway; I can't quite figure that part out. The shaper is kind of a blues player type from the 1920's or so. It's weird, but it's really good. If you don't read it based on my weak explanation, I get that. But if you're up for something new and different, give this a try.

Helena Crash #2: Same goes for Helena Crash! This one, from IDW, has our coffee smuggler taking a job looking for a VHS tape for an alien who is obsessed (and has seemingly taken the identity of) a martial artist known as the White Dragon. Helena goes from pawn shop to pawn shop until she finds a copy, delivers it to her employer, and then finds herself squaring off against said employer. This book is just so much fun. If you like Marshall Law or Head Lopper, this book is definitely worth a look!

Just finished up Jules Feiffer's Kill My Mother. A nice piece of noir, with honestly not very many likable characters. I'm not a big fan of Feiffer's art, but the story really works, so I didn't mind. 

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