Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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I recently read the first trade of the latest Flash series titled Lightning Strikes Twice. This is the story in which a speed force storms hits Central City and turns dozens of the citizens into speedsters. We then get the arrival of a new villain, Godspeed. Who it was was pretty obvious. Still, this was a good comic. With a lot of different characters getting the spotlight.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

One thing I had never noticed before is that, when Sam Wilson sees Sharon and Cap off at the airport (p.12), Sam kisses Sharon on the cheek, with an older couple glaring at them aghast with shocj=k and disapproval.

There was an earlier sequnce in (I think) the Captain America book that had a contemporary (1968-1969, I think) romance between Peggy Carter and Gabe Jones. IIRC, they were just standing next to each other and it was all in the scripting. I have found references to it but no citation of an issue number.

At the time I thought it was a breakthrough, and said as much to a longtime acquaintance/friend in a letter. It turned out that he was raised to not approve of interracial romances. When I wanted to discuss it further he cut me off completely. It was pretty upsetting at the time and has stuck in my memory. No longer having the books or reprints of them, does anyone know where this appeared?

That scene sounds very familiar to me, Richard, but I think you're misremembering when it happened. Peggy Carter has not yet been reintroduced into modern copntinuity; that scene is yet to come in the Englehart era. I'll let you know when I get to it. Maybe Englehart has a behind-the-scenes story to tell in the introduction as well.

Jeff of Earth-J said:
That scene sounds very familiar to me, Richard, but I think you're misremembering when it happened. Peggy Carter has not yet been reintroduced into modern copntinuity; that scene is yet to come in the Englehart era. I'll let you know when I get to it. Maybe Englehart has a behind-the-scenes story to tell in the introduction as well.

I would have sworn this was in the 1968-1969 timeframe, but doing a GCD search for Peggy Carter I see that she appeared in the same story with Gabe Jones in Captain America 167, 175, 178, 181-188 and 191.

Issues 176-192 were reprinted in Marvel Masterworks: Captain America Vol. 9. Issues 157-186 were reprinted in Essential Captain America #4. Apparently the Omnibus and Epic series haven't reprinted these yet.

Speaking of Captain America

CAPTAIN AMERICA #157-158: Last week I mentioned that I kept these two issues when Ihad gotten rid of so many others. Even after re-reading them I don’t recall exactly why I kept them, but I have a hunch. I’ll kow for sure when I get to #163 (another one I kept).

BATMAN ‘66/WONDER WOMAN ’77 #5: With this issue, the story jumps ahead to 1977 and features Dick Grayson as Nightwing. Interesting.

I have been reading and enjoying the various Batman ’66 series which kind of pick up where the TV series left off and advance the concept by introducing characters from throughout the DC universe (and beyond) into that milieu. It strikes me, though, that the run of issues contained in the Bronze Age B&B Omnibus accomplish that same end much more organically and effectively. Just an observation. Moving on to the Neal Adams issues of B&B..

THE BRAVE & THE BOLD #79-84:

Back in 1988, DC Comics released The Best of the Brave & the Bold limited series reprinting #80-84, 93 plus adventure stories featuring the Silent Knight, the Golden Gladiator and the Viking Prince from the early days. As I was reading these issues it occurred to me it hasn’t been 29 years since I last read these stories, it’s been more like 14, because I last read them when the complete Batman by Neal Adams was published. Still, that 1988 Best of B&B mini-series was my first encounter with these stories. The mini-series re-ordered them in a way that made more sense for a reprint series, but I’ll be dealing with them in original publication order.

#79 – Deadman: Not included in the Best of B&B mini, it was reprinted around that same time in a Deadman reprint series, and has been reprinted many times over the years. This is not Deadman’s first appearance, but it may well have been many readers’ first encounter with him. As such, Bob Haney did a good job of introducing the character to a otentially new audience.

#80 – Creeper: My first exposure to the character was the cover of Creeper #4 in a spot ad of another DC comic from the month it was released. The first Creeper story I ever read was either this one, or the one which appeared in an early issue of post-Crisis Justice League. Neither of those stories did a good job of introducing the character. It wasn’t until DC reprinted Ditko’s complete Creeper in hardcover that I really got a good handle on the character. (I really get the impression that Jack Ryder works at Fox News.) The reprint series had new covers and, in especially this case, better ones than the originals.

#81 – Flash: “But Bork Can Hurt You!” Classic. The character was later revived for the abortive “Powers” concept.

#82 – Aquaman: Top-loading this series with JLA members was a good idea for the reprint. I think this was my first exposure to Aquaman’s half-brother Orm.

#83 – Teen Titans: I always find it hard to believe how sappy Bruce Wayne is in this story. In fact, the whole story’s sappy.

#84 – Green Arrow: The introduction of the “new” (i.e., bearded) Green Arrow. DC made this the first story in the reprint series, and rightly so. It’s the one of most historical significance (arguably the only one of historical significance).

Actually B&B #84 featured Sgt. Rock. #85 (S'69) had the New Green Arrow. And it was only the costume change that was new. He was still the "old" Green Arrow but that was quickly rectified in Justice League of America #75 (N'69) where he lost his fortune, had his world view shattered and modified and was attracted to Black Canary.

Green Lantern/Green Arrow #76 was published in April 1970 so DC had fast-tracked the Emerald Archer and gave him a mega-push!

Thanks for the "correction" regarding Green Arrow, but for the record, DC agrees with me. (I did specify "bearded" and I put "new" in quotation marks).


I did want to say something about the Sgt. Rock issue, though, so thanks for the reminder regarding the issue number. I didn’t have that one as a kid, but I had another comic from the same month with a house ad for it. I hadn’t read a Sgt. Rock story at the time (and wouldn’t for many, many years to come), but that cover made me want to read that story. It’s one of those typical Bob Haney stories which takes place in his own little corner of the DC universe. The framing sequence takes place in the present day, but the main story takes place in 1944 when Batman, the Haney-verse Earth-1 (I guess) Batman met Sgt. Rock during WWII. The present-day Rock appears at the end, still a Sergeant.

The continuity’s wonky, but ain’t that a great cover?

Oh Green Arrow had a radical new look but the radical attitude came via Denny O'Neil a couple of months later!

Image's No Mercy Vol. 1 by Alex de Campi and Carla Speed McNeil. This was a crazy kind of story about a bunch of late-teen "skip year"-ish kids who go on a mission trip to "make the world a better. Place", and get sidetracked by a horrible accident. Of course, all of them are completely unlikeable, so rooting for any of them is just choosing your shade of grey. I have volume 2 also, so I will let you know what I think of that one soon. Great creative team with ambiguous characters with great art by McNeil, this is a very character-driven story with all kinds of horror around it.
I love this issue! I don't care if it doesn't make any sense. It's a fantastic story.



Jeff of Earth-J said:

Thanks for the "correction" regarding Green Arrow, but for the record, DC agrees with me. (I did specify "bearded" and I put "new" in quotation marks).


I did want to say something about the Sgt. Rock issue, though, so thanks for the reminder regarding the issue number. I didn’t have that one as a kid, but I had another comic from the same month with a house ad for it. I hadn’t read a Sgt. Rock story at the time (and wouldn’t for many, many years to come), but that cover made me want to read that story. It’s one of those typical Bob Haney stories which takes place in his own little corner of the DC universe. The framing sequence takes place in the present day, but the main story takes place in 1944 when Batman, the Haney-verse Earth-1 (I guess) Batman met Sgt. Rock during WWII. The present-day Rock appears at the end, still a Sergeant.

The continuity’s wonky, but ain’t that a great cover?

Just finished reading Dr. Strange vol. 1 The Way of the Weird which is the first five issues of Jason Aaron and Chris Bachalo's run on the Sorcerer Supreme. I'm the first to admit I've never been a Dr. strange fan, nor of Bachalo's art, but I heard a lot good things about this series. I also like to try and give characters I don't normally gravitate to a shot at interesting me. Aaaaand, Jason Aaron didn't make me a convert. I'm still not a fan. 

Plus, the first trade doesn't even wrap up the storyline, so I that ticked me off as well. The long and short of it is that something is destroying  magic across all of the dimension, including the Sorcerer Supreme's of those dimensions. It had some good ideas, but it was just okay for me. Maybe if you're a fan of the good doctor you'll enjoy this more.

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